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Messages - iwstamp

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1
General Discussion / Re: Low Carb and Long Distance Touring
« on: March 30, 2014, 08:28:52 am »
Thanks World Traveler (7 months late, sorry!). I agree. I feel that my body is "fat adapted" at this point. I can ride 6 or 7 hours with nothing but water (and some sodium). I eat less than 40 g of carbs per day and only eat in a four hour window. So, during the day won't be an issue....but finding high-fat quality foods without sugar or grains will be a problem. I will be taking some multi-day trips this spring.. we'll see how it goes! I suppose I could have a nice steak and salad every night...but that would be too expensive!

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Gear Talk / Re: Mostly road tour with a Fargo or Divide?
« on: December 15, 2013, 07:45:39 am »
Thanks Dave... the more I investigate the geometry of the Divide certainly looks more suitable to long distance touring. The nearest CoMotion dealer from me is two hours away. Worth the trip to be sure..for sure.

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Gear Talk / Mostly road tour with a Fargo or Divide?
« on: December 15, 2013, 05:35:08 am »
I am thinking of purchasing a Salsa Fargo or CoMotion Divide as a part bad road part off road riding option. I was curious if either of these bikes has been used as a x-country (or other long tour) transport where the occasional (or more than occasional) dirt/gravel road was incorporated? It started me thinking - it's obvious that both of these bikes are perfect for an off-road tour (the Great Divide comes to mind) but how would they open up options for a tour across the country if dirt and gravel roads could be incorporated... and has anyone done that? Lastly, assuming that there would be days and days of standard road riding... what are the draw backs with either of these bikes?

Thanks!!

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General Discussion / Re: Complete newb, TA in 2014
« on: August 23, 2013, 01:21:13 am »
I second REI. I have a two year old Novara Safari, bought new with the REI members discount for $800. I upgraded the wheels ($400) and the rack ($50) and bought some nice panniers. Don't forget a light, maybe a GPS (I love my Garmin), So you can get a nice bike and accoutrements (not counting the GPS) for less than $1500. I have 2000 miles on the Safari...it is all the touring bike I need.

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Continued (my post was cut off): Click on the video about halfway down the page, titled "Driving Kills", and originally made by Copenhagenize.com as a visual What-if-car-companies-were-required-to-practice-truth-in-advertising spot.

On the other hand, if your question is really whether long distance touring is healthier than day rides or commuting, the correct answer might be "it depends".

It is my experience that if you don't manage your resources properly, both in and outside of your body, you won't be a long distance tourer for long.  On the other hand, long distance touring teaches you a lot about your body (if you care to listen) and so you may start out doing many of the wrong things and end up managing your resources just fine.  You probably want to use the same common sense though regarding the kind of food you consume that you try to use when you're home.  I eat much as I do at home for all but one and sample the local fare during the one meal.  I do carry some food bars with me for emergency rations but I really don't need them often.

Long distance touring also doesn't necessarily mean that you're riding from sun-up to sun-down, though if this is what floats your boat and you feel good doing it, by all means, go for it.  When I tour, I'm not in a hurry.  I prefer to ride for 5 hours or so and use the rest of my waking hours securing food and a shower, doing laundry, pitching my tent, visiting the library or local museum to charge my gadgets and learn about the local area and people, socializing (when possible), reading and so forth.  So long-distance touring may look completely different for you than it looks for me (aside from that it keeps going for weeks or months on end).  But just the fact that it keeps going doesn't in itself make it extreme or unhealthy.

Great advice Tina!

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General Discussion / Re: Low Carb and Long Distance Touring
« on: July 30, 2013, 01:49:59 am »

I couldn't agree with hyegeek more. Carbohydrates are unnecessary, unlike fats and protein. My experience is similar as well... 50 years old, lost 100lbs by eliminating sugar, grains (most starches) and seed and vegetable oils and lots of biking of course. My protocol is to eat real food... sounds strange but I always eat at home.  Meaning I never eat at restaurants or fast food joints. A long distance tour would present some special challenges for me.

Um, I think you must have been absent that day...

Um, do a little reading and get back to me...

7
General Discussion / Re: Low Carb and Long Distance Touring
« on: July 26, 2013, 02:06:05 am »
I do low carb for medical reasons. It is how I'm controlling my blood sugars.

I agree with your statement on what a good diet is. I also believe I've settled on a good one. I get most of my carbs from veggies and the rest from some fruit. In fact, I eat a lot more veggies then I ever did when I was eating a "balanced" diet. What I don't eat are the highly processed carbs (starches and sugar) that make up so much of the food I see around me. Most of my calories come from fat and my body is tuned to burn fat. Now at 49, I have better health and more energy then I did when I was in my 20s.

When I'm out someplace and can't get my preferred foods, I will settle for whatever keeps me going without dumping starches/sugars or other processed carbs into my system. Those will not only raise my blood sugar into a dangerous range, but will have me feeling terrible for several days after eating them. Given the choice, I'd drink a cup of olive oil before I even considered a Twinkie.

I couldn't agree with hyegeek more. Carbohydrates are unnecessary, unlike fats and protein. My experience is similar as well... 50 years old, lost 100lbs by eliminating sugar, grains (most starches) and seed and vegetable oils and lots of biking of course. My protocol is to eat real food... sounds strange but I always eat at home.  Meaning I never eat at restaurants or fast food joints. A long distance tour would present some special challenges for me.

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General Discussion / Re: Low Carb and Long Distance Touring
« on: July 18, 2013, 02:03:06 am »
Never a problem riding many miles and I feel that it actually enhances my athletic performance (fat burning as opposed to sugar burning).

What are many miles for you?

My standard pace is 125 mi/day. Anything 125-200 mi/day is many miles for me. I would consider it amazing doing 125 mi/day for 30 days without any single rest day on low carb food.

Lucas

125? That beats me.. I haven't done an extended tour (more than a few days) I am usually around 70-75 miles per day. Carbs are an unecessary macro nutrient... there is no reason (once keto adapted) that the body could not perform athletically for many many days while burning body fat.

9
Heading on the Northern Tier (West to East) sometime next year. I am going to Boston so I'd like to connect Buffalo to Boston ( I could pick-up the Atlantic coast in Poughkeepsie NY). Ride with GPS says staraight across to Albany then south to Poughkeepisie is the way to go. Also, I'd like to break off the northern tier and cut straight across WI (from Osceola) to pick up the ferry in Manitowoc WI.

Thanks!

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General Discussion / Re: Low Carb and Long Distance Touring
« on: July 17, 2013, 03:47:15 pm »
I have toured while eating a partly low carb diet in SE Asia simply because there was little high carb food available in rural Laos and Vietnam. I lost what little fat I had and more, I felt apathetic and I was told that I looked dreadful and unhealthy which I certainly felt, it is not an experience or diet I would wish to repeat.

Well, it works for me... I would think that a cross country trip would lend itself to a lot of junk food (not to mention high on carbs).. it is about carbs but think of it as a more Paleo approach. I read many journals on Crazy Guy on a Bike that reference daily visits to McDonalds, Burger King, etc. I can't and won't eat that food... just curious what other options I have.

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General Discussion / Re: Brooks Sadles
« on: July 07, 2013, 09:17:36 am »
I am a male and love, love, love my Brooks Saddle(s). I have the B17 on my touring bike and a standard model on my racing bike. I wouldn't ride with anything else. Break in was pretty quick (about 100 miles for each). My wife on the other hand hates it (tried it for one ride)... too hard no padding and pain in her unmentionable areas. I ended up getting her a Terri saddle. Made for women (has a hole in the middle) and she loves it. So we're both happy...

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General Discussion / Low Carb and Long Distance Touring
« on: July 07, 2013, 09:12:28 am »
I added this question to an overall health topic but I'd like to give it it's due as a separate post. I'm a dedicated low carbist (no pasta, bread, sugar, glucose, sports drinks, most fruit, etc)... usually less than 40g carbs per day (I also fast intermittently). Never a problem riding many miles and I feel that it actually enhances my athletic performance (fat burning as opposed to sugar burning). I don't mean to get into a discussion regarding the merits or lack thereof of a low carb / paleo lifestyle.. not the proper forum. I am just curious if any low carbists have attempted to stick with their regimen while on a multi-week tour and how they managed to cope?

Thanks!!

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Maybe just coincidence, but I cannot help but suspect that the steady diet of pizza, ice cream, peanut butter, cheese, cookies, hash browns, bacon, eggs, biscuits and gravy may have aggravated an existing condition and contributed to the attacks. When traveling with a group it's easy to chow down with everybody else thinking your normal again for the duration of the trip when you still have CAD. It' easy to say "I worked hard today and I deserve this pint of ice cream!" Yes, I think one needs and burns off the extra calories but in my case the cholesterol kept rising despite the exercise.


Amazing how you overcame your health issues! This actually gets to the heart of my question (no pun intended) or at least a real concern of mine. This might be a topic onto itself but while on the road, there are scant food choices...or should I say scant healthy food choices. I actually subscribe to a low carb, whole food regimen. I am in a constant state of ketosis and my body has adapted to burning fat (as opposed to sugar) for fuel. I have done many long distance rides with a few centuries thrown in without having to carb load before or sugar fuel during the ride. A cross country trip would not offer the dietary options that I have while close to home. Again, off point but something I'd be interested in knowing if any other low carbists have ridden cross country and somehow managed to stick with their protocol?

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Well just a tad under. But that is without any load. Loaded (and not hell bent on improving my time), it is more like 11 to 12.

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I know what you are thinking... How could it not be? 75 miles day after day on a loaded bike for weeks and weeks no less. It has to translate into both short term and long term health benefits. I ride about 80 to 100 miles per week... On a touring bike over very, very hilly terrain so I only average about 14 miles per hour. The reason I bring up the health question is that there is more and more evidence that "endurance" athletes may actually be doing more harm than good to their heart and longevity. I won't go into all the studies here but the data is compelling. I am planning my own cross country trip and I don't think I'll pay this notion too much mind.... Just curious if anyone else has an opinion. Do long distance cyclists live longer or shorter than the regular Joe?

Thanks!

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