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Messages - ducnut

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1
Gear Talk / Re: Brifters vs. bar-end from a convenience standpoint
« on: November 29, 2011, 09:56:39 pm »
Some of you might find this development of interest http://www.bikerumor.com/2011/11/28/first-look-retroshift-brake-shift-levers-for-cyclocross/
Basically a downtube shifter adapted to a cross brake lever.

That's interesting!

2
Gear Talk / Re: Pletscher Double Kickstand installation
« on: November 28, 2011, 08:21:48 pm »
Others have also posted good results using the "Deluxe Top Plate" found online at http://www.thorusa.com/dahon/accessories/pletscher.htm. Comes with two plastic sleeves to protect the chainstay and a longer bolt. Looks like a good way to go, too.

Thanks for the link. That deal is exactly what I need for a project bike.

3
Gear Talk / Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« on: November 28, 2011, 03:31:55 pm »
Also, ditch the included nuts. Go to the hardware store and buy nyloc nuts. Install them with threadlocker.

If you (or a friend) have a rivet gun, stainless rivets work well for this application.  If you don't have one, this is a great excuse to get one!

I've got one. Just never thought of it. Thanks!

4
Gear Talk / Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« on: November 28, 2011, 12:36:26 pm »
1. Yes. As mentioned, it helps keep down spray and debris for following riders. My GF regularly drafts me and appreciates the fender and flap. And, a rear flaps looks nicer.
2. Yes. I use neatsfoot oil on my saddle and flaps, as it soaks right in and works brilliantly. It helps to protect and keep them pliable. I've never used Proofride.
3. Yes. I used a drill and took my time. I put a piece of masking tape across the fender, to help with marking hole locations.

Also, ditch the included nuts. Go to the hardware store and buy nyloc nuts. Install them with threadlocker. I noticed the included nuts loosening, with every ride, and kept tightening them. Eventually, the rear flap fell off, along a busy highway. I didn't notice until I stopped for a break. I had to backtrack to find it. Fortunately, it was only a few miles back.

5
Gear Talk / Re: Brifters vs. bar-end from a convenience standpoint
« on: November 28, 2011, 12:22:16 pm »
Additionally, and like Shimano, a nice all-SRAM touring drivetrain could be put together mixing their road, mountain and Truvativ lines.

And what SRAM road bike shifter would you use to shift the triple crankset?

I'm guessing Twist Shifters. I've seen people using them on road bars. Not my cup o' tea, but, whatever.

http://www.sram.com/sram/mountain/category/81

6
Gear Talk / Re: SRAM Apex?
« on: November 28, 2011, 12:13:16 pm »
I think your loaded weight and fitness level are two keys to gear requirements, the third being maximum grades.  A 25" low gear would limit me to about 8% at my unloaded weight and fitness level.  To avoid knee problems, carry a load, and climb steeper grades, I need a low of 20" or lower.  Can you get that with a compact double?

If you're running a compact double (50/34 or 48/34 crankset) and an Apex RD, you're limited to the 25.7" that I previously posted. However, one could slip in a 2X10 MTB crank (36/22, 38/24, 39/26, or 42/28) and get even lower range (22 'ring and 36T low gear =16.6"). But, you'd be limited on the high-end, with the smaller 'rings. I've been looking at swapping in a 42/28 X9 MTB crankset, as an experiment. That would give a 95.1" high-gear and 21.1" low-gear, which is all I'd ever need, loaded or not. I hardly use the smallest 3 cogs with a compact crankset and this would allow those to be utilized as well as getting a bit lower gear. My LBS has all of SRAM's, Shimano's, and Campy's groupsets on the shelf and they're always up for gaining knowledge, so experimenting is no problem.

Well, everybody has a different fitness level. It's really hard to judge what's reasonable for another, especially given that another's psyche is different from one's own. Riding that I perceive to be "nothing too difficult" is probably tough to another. I don't know. I guess one just has to get out there and see what bicycle combination works for them.

7
Gear Talk / Re: SRAM Apex?
« on: November 28, 2011, 11:26:26 am »
I've plugged in numbers, based on a 35mm tire, for low gear inches:
Apex 34X36=25.7
Apex 38X36 (my GF's setup)=28.7
Road-triple 30X27=30.2
MTB 24X36=18.1
MTB 22X36 (as some here run)=16.6
Surly LHT 26X34=20.8
My MTB 22X36 (56mm tire)=17.8
OK except a road triple isn't limited to it's OEM 30T granny ring.  I've swapped the 30T for a 26T on numerous bikes and that gives a 26x27 = 26 gear-inch low gear.  They still shift well.

The road-triple that I posted is the common, OEM low-gear.

After all that, IMHO, you don't need a triple for light-touring and general use. However, you do need a mid- or long-cage rear derailluer. That'll allow you to swing a 36T low gear; a short-cage RD limits you to a 28T low gear.

That's not accurate.  You need a MTB rear derailleur for a 36T (or 34T or 32T for that matter) large cog.  A long cage road derailleur has the same big cog limitation as the short cage versions.

Sorry. I missed putting MTB in there and reading how that was stated. The Cross-Check the OP linked has a Deore RD swinging a 32T and can go up to 36T, which is the important part of his needs. The Apex groupset is the exception to the above, as it's a road groupset whose mid-cage will swing a 36T.

Hopefully, that'll clarify a bit better.

8
Your BSA looks like the bike me and many of my friends had in the early to mid 1970's, I think they were the same bike produced by Raleigh in Nottingham but badged up as BSA, Triumph and possibly Sun, fitted with single speed or Sturmey Archer three speed.

Triumph, Humber, Raleigh, Rudge, Sunbeam, Norman, Three Spires, Hercules, New Hudson, Sun, Phillips, Carlton, and Moulton(?) are the nameplates I know of. Most of the differences were just badge engineering and a brand-specific chainwheel. I watch nearly all those nameplates on eBay for parts, as one never knows what'll pop up.

One's bicycling history has caused several people to stop me and ask about the bike. I've had three take spins on it and two have solicited buildups. I'm in the midst of gathering parts for one and still planning components and powder for the other. These English lightweights ride really nice and offer a lot of function, with modern components.

9
Gear Talk / Re: Brifters vs. bar-end from a convenience standpoint
« on: November 27, 2011, 08:03:00 pm »
Some have mentioned cables being in the way with brifters and using handlebar bags. Current-model, Shimano, Campy, and SRAM route the cables under the bar tape.

I've used brifter, bar-end, down-tube, and stem-mounted, with dropbars. I'll take brifters, everytime. Though, I equally like a flatbar and triggers.

10
Gear Talk / Re: SRAM Apex?
« on: November 27, 2011, 07:50:23 pm »
The OP stated "light-tourer" and "all-purpose"; not fully-loaded touring.

Some posters need to educate themselves on what Apex WiFli, compact-double, road-double, road-triple, and MTB-triple are and what can be done with gearing, before posting. Laying out a spreadsheet of all the different gearing options and ratios will go a long way to realizing what one truly is looking at. I'm not meaning to be harsh here, but, it irks the crap out of me when people post up comments without knowing what they're talking about. These posts greatly affect the OP's decision making process.

Apex is going to have ratios further apart. However, the "holes" are minimal, as one can use both rings (cross-chaining is encouraged with SRAM) to achieve a workable gear ratio. WiFli is the equivalent to specifying a 10 speed transmission versus an 18 speed transmission, in a semi. Yes. The 18 speed is going to be faster up a hill (because of keeping closer to peak power), but, it's heavier, more complicated to operate, and has ratio overlap, just like in bicycles. If one were in the big ring and steadily dropped gears on the cassette, when they dropped a 'ring, there will be considerable overlap in gearing and will have to upshift the cassette several cogs to continue in a natural progression of lower gear ratios, just like a semi. Furthermore, dropping a triple into the smaller 'ring will result in performing the same process, again. WiFli doesn't have so much overlap in ratios, as there are only two chainrings. I find when I drop the 'ring I need to upshift two cassette cogs to continue the natural progression. Again, for my riding style, fitness, and terrain encountered, it works perfectly.

I've been running Apex on mine and my GF's Specialized Tricrosses, for two years. The most I carry is ~25lbs in a rear rack bag and a small frame bag (she, a small frame bag), as we rely on convenience and grocery stores. We, both, run 4 bottle mounts. I'm currently running a compact crank (48/34) spinning a 12-32 cassette. She's running a 'cross crank (46/38) spinning a 12-36 cassette. In road cycling GA, TN, IL, MO, NY, VT, and FL, I've not found the need for MTB gearing, at my loaded weight and fitness level. With Apex, we've never had chains drop or any other malfunction/problems. Shifts are instantaneous and solid. I'll continue to use the groupset on everything, in the future.

I'm so smitten with SRAM's WiFli ideaology, I bought a new MTB with SRAM's 2X10 drivetrain. I went from a 3X9 XTR drivetrain and will never go back to a triple. My peer group questioned the decision, stating fewer gear ratios. However, I pointed out that a lot of ratios are overlapped, or close to it, and most of our MTB riding is done in the smaller two 'rings and primarily somewhere at the point of shifting between those two smaller rings. With the 2X10, I can stay in the small ring. I climb everything I did before, to the point of going up stuff the others walk. I only use the big 'ring on the flats. They positively commented with amazement, upon hearing me shifting through gears, wherever I chose. It shifts so quickly and positively that my rear wheel spokes "ping", even under load.

It was mentioned that a mechanic is crucial to good operation. I'd argue that component level is equally important. No matter who the mechanic, one will never get a Sora/Tiagra road setup to shift as cleanly as XT/XTR, that most tourists use. To me that's a huge deal breaker, as the average cyclist doesn't realize the difference. All they've heard is "triple" and they end up buying something with a road triple that shifts like garbage. If you're going to go triple, be sure it's a MTB triple. Furthermore, chain selection makes all the difference in the world, to shifting quality. Don't skimp on chains.

I've plugged in numbers, based on a 35mm tire, for low gear inches:
Apex 34X36=25.7
Apex 38X36 (my GF's setup)=28.7
Road-triple 30X27=30.2
MTB 24X36=18.1
MTB 22X36 (as some here run)=16.6
Surly LHT 26X34=20.8
My MTB 22X36 (56mm tire)=17.8

After all that, IMHO, you don't need a triple for light-touring and general use. However, you do need a mid- or long-cage MTB rear derailluer or Apex groupset. That'll allow you to swing a 36T low gear; a road RD limits you to a 28T low gear. The Cross-Check has the MTB derailluer necessary to swing the bigger cog.

As for the Cross-Check, I wouldn't hesitate to buy one for your intended use. If you're on a budget and don't have stigmas related to brands, you may consider the bike at the following link (both are made in China).
http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/fantom_cxx.htm


11
Given that you're in the UK, I'd fancy something English, as they'd be easy to find.

I don't exactly know when Raleigh-Nottingham started/stopped making cassette-geared bikes. I've seen some early 70's stuff that'd probably work. I've been watching eBay for something to use as a project and find out what exactly will work for derailluers and cassette. I've been messing with early 60's stuff. I currently have a '63 BSA, '63 Phillips Ranger, and '64 Armstrong. I, also, have a couple '79 10-speed models, but, they're made in Thailand and not near the quality of the Nottingham stuff (too nice to see go to the scrapyard). Anyway, my 60's bikes are all 26", 3-speed Raleigh Industries (RI) bikes. Everything I've seen, except for race bikes, have dropout eyelets and are lugged (not high-end cast). They easily can be upgraded with modern components. The 3-speed frames have 120mm rear and 90mm front spacing (my Thai 10-speed bikes are 130/100, respectively) and no derailluer provision, so 3-speed frames are out. The BB and headset are 26TPI, but, that's no problem. The steerer can be re-threaded to 24TPI by any bike shop. That'll allow you to run any modern 1"X24TPI headset. The BB is the same diameter as Campy and can be re-threaded, too. That'll allow you to run any Campy-dimensioned BB. Modern 700c wheelsets fit, using standard dual-pivot brakes. A 25mm tire is all that will fit with 35mm fenders. Otherwise, you can run up to 32mm, depending on actual dimension. The seatpost is 25.4mm and the stem is, also, 25.4mm. That means you can run a modern seatpost and quill or adapter stem. So, with all that, I'd try to find an early 70's, Nottingham-built, 26", 10 speed Raleigh Industries bike. They ride super-nice and are compliant.

To get ideas started, this is my BSA single-speed project. The bar and seat position are just slipped together. It's actually on the road, but, awaiting decals. Maybe, I'll update this thread, when it's done.



12
Gear Talk / Re: Gunnar frames - are they any good????
« on: October 23, 2011, 06:56:28 pm »
I have a Fast Lane with disk brakes. It is for "light touring" and so I pull Burley Nomad. The Nomad only puts about 11 lbs on the bike. I had no problems on a 3000 mile ride.

Thanks for reviving this thread. I'm looking at going to a steel-framed, disc bike. I'd totally forgotten about this model and am going to give Waterford a ring, in the AM.

13
South Atlantic / Re: Cross Florida Greenway Connection to the East Coast?
« on: October 08, 2011, 10:05:06 am »
That bridge on I-95 is in the Pellicer Creek Conservation Area: http://www.sjrwmd.com/recreationguide/pellicercreek/map_property.html
It doesn't seem to be useful as part of a through route.

Thanks for the link.

I went down, last Feb, and rode all the singletrack between Santos and HWY 200, just east of Dunnellon. The  western end of the MTB trail terminates at the highway and only the equine trail continues. Supposedly, OMBA are going to continue west with the MTB trail. Next year, I want to ride from Santos eastward as far as I can, on singletrack.

14
Gear Talk / Re: stemcaptain compass
« on: September 30, 2011, 09:54:08 am »
I wish even a good GPS would work, on the roads I ride. I have a Garmin 705 and ride a lot of gravel and dirt roads. Those aren't on Garmin maps; only county roads (CR on a map) or better show up. What's worse is the unit doesn't "learn" the roads one has travelled. If I've been on it, in the past, it should show up. On singletrack, it's useless. The best it can do for me is show communities, county roads, and bearing that help me to know kinda' where I'm at.

Yeah, we have had a lot of discussion of this over in the GPS forum. The Edge series are really meant for training rides, and they are very good at that. For touring and navigating new terrain, the Vista or GPSMAP series do much better. For your rides, loading the topographic map set would probably do very well, perhaps in conjunction with the City Navigator road maps.

You can examine the coverage of the various map products on Garmin's web site. Take a look at some back roads that you know well and see how they do.

Fred

Thanks for the tips.

I'll give the other maps and systems a look.

15
Gear Talk / Re: stemcaptain compass
« on: September 29, 2011, 09:05:24 am »
I have just carried a hand held compass.  It is a very basic Silva model.  
+1  Silva or similar hand held compasses are very thin and light and will disappear into a jersey pocket but provide more accuracy and reliability than any bike mounted compass since you can step away from the bike's metal for a reading.  For road riding they provide more accuracy than you will ever need.  For off-road use they are far better than anything but a good GPS.

I wish even a good GPS would work, on the roads I ride. I have a Garmin 705 and ride a lot of gravel and dirt roads. Those aren't on Garmin maps; only county roads (CR on a map) or better show up. What's worse is the unit doesn't "learn" the roads one has travelled. If I've been on it, in the past, it should show up. On singletrack, it's useless. The best it can do for me is show communities, county roads, and bearing that help me to know kinda' where I'm at.

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