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Messages - cidhandyman

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1
Classifieds / Mongoose Titanium mountain bike for sale or trade
« on: December 24, 2004, 12:13:34 am »
I have a  1999 size 20 inch, Mongoose titanium mountain bike with a  burgundy Chris King Aheadset, Hugi rear hub and XTR front hub laced to Sun XC rims. The front wheel is laced radially, the rear is 3 cross. The bike has a Kooka 175mm crank with Shimano SPD pedals, syncros seatpost, wtb saddle.  V-brakes front and rear and a Manitou Mach 5 suspension fork. It currently has a set of brand new WYB velociraptor tires front and rear. Gripshift Quarz shifters, Deore front and rear derailleurs and a riser bar.  I'm offering it all plus spare road tires for $1100. I would consider a trade for a Catrike Speed or similar.  I would like to pursue more road touring and I am looking for a more comfortable road going setup.  Please email with any questions.

Thanks and Happy Holidays to all.


Keep pedaling

Julian H.

2
Classifieds / Wanted...needed
« on: December 24, 2004, 12:15:04 am »
check with Bike Nashbar, they usually have them for a cheap price.

Keep pedaling

Julian H.

3
Gear Talk / Panniers
« on: July 29, 2004, 04:25:01 am »
Greetings,

I own two sets of the Nashbar roll top panniers.  I think they work fine.  I have carried my laptop in them during heavy deluges and found my gear to be perfectly dry upon arriving at my destinations.  The roll top closure as well as two sets of buckles allows you to seal them and cinch down excess.  As far as packing them.  I use cheap nylon stuff sacks. It helps to put items in various bags of a certain color.  For example, my camp headlight and small tools go in a yellow bag, my water related items in blue, and warm weather clothing in orange, cool weather in dark blue.  You dont need to get this detailed but it helps to have a system in place to make finding items easier.



Keep pedaling

Julian H.

4
General Discussion / Bicycling Stroll through the National Parks
« on: August 01, 2004, 12:30:40 am »
Greetings,

I think its a good idea.  My concerns would be covering the costs associated with operating two vehicles which will undoubtedly burn lots of petrol. The other issue is where to advertise.  Pick media sources which reach your target audience but not just through internet and print.  Try local events which cater to those groups also and advertise in printed handouts or cycling calendars that are printed in bike shops nearby.  It may also be good to setup some sort of web based system so that potential riders can inquire about the ride, mileage, what to bring and such.  Also have a back up plan in case you run into something which makes the potential route traveled impassable, like inclement weather or roadway construction.  Im sure you will get other input for your idea through this source.  Good thinking, it should be a good ride.  Time to round up your staff and potential riders and calculate costs that need to be covered.

Keep pedaling

Julian H.

5
General Discussion / knee pain
« on: July 29, 2004, 03:18:48 am »
I've had knee pain to an extent over the years.  I have found that standing against a wall and then sliding down so that my quads are parallel to the floor and holding this movement until failure, resting for two minutes and repeating for three sets will strengthen the muscles above and below the knee.  Basically you use your back and legs to hold the position and over time this will build strength in the muscle groups that support the knee.  You have also stated that you will check your position on the bike.  You might also want to make sure the toe straps you are using position the foot just over the pedal axle.  If its too far forward or back or if the foot pronates during the pedal motion you will experience discomfort as well.


6
General Discussion / totally new
« on: July 29, 2004, 03:21:31 am »
If you are still interested in finding out more about planning for a trip you can visit the following sites.   www.crazyguyonabike.com   They list journals from seasoned and novice bike tourers.  You will get input from cyclists as well as the webmaster who completed his own lengthy trip in 1998.  Topics range from coast to coast, international, as well as local rides.  You can also email me if you have other questions.   cidhandyman@sbcglobal.net

Happy riding.

Julian


7
I never even thought of given this option a look.  Thanks I will check into this.

Julian


8
General Discussion / HELP! Being Harrased by Police!
« on: July 29, 2004, 03:27:31 am »
I agree with the previous post but you also may want to make sure that your tent fly is not bright orange or some other high visibility color.  It helps when you need to "stealth camp" to be able to blend in.  Also try to locate your "camp" far away from motorist's parking and park entrances and anything associated with childrens playgrounds.   You dont want to end up with any regrets just trying to setup camp for a night.   I would highly recommend speaking to any security or policeman on site to let them know your intentions ahead of time.  It might save you a very early flashlight wake up call.

Julian  


9
General Discussion / sequoia for loaded touring
« on: July 30, 2004, 05:12:21 pm »
Erin, I will start leaving you website links to info which may help you and anyone else who views this thread.

http://www.jandd.com/Technotes/technotes_HowToPack_pan.asp

Keep pedaling

Julian H.

10
General Discussion / sequoia for loaded touring
« on: July 30, 2004, 03:20:15 pm »
Hi Erin,

You know I am in the stages of getting my stuff together also.  I have found that reading travelogues of other travelers, from novices to those who bicycle across the globe gives me a starting point.  I also read the online versions of many outdoor magazines.  Some examples are below:
www.backpacker.com
www.crazyguyonabike.com
www.outsideonline.com
www.gorp.com
www.kenkifer.com
www.bicycling.com
www.travel-library.com

On these sites you can find packing lists which include the basic items to take and in many cases personal recommendations from other more established bicycle tourers.  I take a summation of this info and print out what I need to study further.  This list is taken to the local REI or Galyans and also some thrift shops.  This way I can see it, try it on and figure out what sizes work best.  From here I usually find the gear is way too overpriced.  Here is a good tip.  I check resale shops for gear often.  To date I have found Pearl Izumi rain pants ($3.99), Pearl Izumi Zephyrr rain jacket ($3.99, Patagonia fleece top (4.99), mountain hardwear rain jacket (7.99) you get the idea.  You can save much money over new if your budget is tight.  I usually check the Goodwill and resale shops in wealthier neighborhoods for best results.  Many times items are donated once there are abrasions, or out of style. My mountain hardwear is purple but I saved over $200.00 on the purchase price.

As far as a tent and sleeping gear. I find many items on ebay.  If I come across an item from the websites listed above I research it online to see how favorably it was reviewed, the pros and cons, then I review what size or model fits my needs.  Then I decide what the max is that I will pay and bid for the item.  This way I bid once and not over and over.  If the final bid exceeds my max then I keep looking until I find the item for the price Im willing to pay.  My tent is an Eureka solo bivy.  It retailed for $89 new, I found mine on clearance at The Sports Authority for $15.  I am putting together a lightweight system of clothing and gear to reduce my on bike carry weight.  My gear will also double as backpacking gear and I want to keep my packweight as light as possible.  In this case I watch the weight of everything I purchase but I also seek out low prices.  This isnt the easiest thing to accomplish but it can work with patience and planning. As far as as a stove, I chose to go with an alcohol stove.  I wanted something that didnt rely on store bought fuel cannisters which are hard to find in some places.  Denatured alcohol can be found in most hardware stores very cheaply and fuels a homemade stove.  You can also buy these on ebay for about $5 to $15 for the stove, windscreen and fuel bottle.

The other thing you are doing which is highly important is continuing to train and dream of where you want to go.  You may not believe this but I have yet to go on an extended tour.  I am in the planning stages as well.  I commute by bicycle myself about 85 miles a week. I'm slowly adding mileage each week to build up my base miles.  My problem is I cant decide where to go. I want to go overseas at some point but I want to get some solid experience touring in the states first.  You may want to consider the supported tours with Adventure Cyclist Magazine.  They have a section on the website which details what they offer.  You can also acquire maps from them with info relevant to bicycle touring.

I ride portions of the Lewis and Clark trail on my training rides from St. Louis to Alton and over to St. Charles.  Local rides are best to practice using camping gear and get used to riding a loaded bicycle.

How is the  bicycle riding in Kansas?  In Missouri we have rolling hills to just about everywhere and the humidity in the summer can be sticky.  

Talk to ya later.

Julian



Keep pedaling

Julian H.

11
General Discussion / sequoia for loaded touring
« on: July 29, 2004, 07:42:06 pm »
Hello again,

I'm glad my tips were of some help.  I have a Novara Randonee touring bike.  It retails for $839.00 for the basic bike.  I got a steal of a deal by purchasing a 2001 model in early 2002.  REI was selling them at $550.00.  I was able to have one shipped in my size from Colorado at the same low sale price.  This saved me tons of money off the bat.  I have fairly cheap blackburn racks but I want to upgrade to thicker tubular racks.  I'm looking into Old Man Mountain racks due to the increased tubing diameter and heavy duty construction.  
The important considerations for me were the following: an aheadset stem for quick stem changes and adjustments, low gearing, a non descript color, eyelets for racks and fenders, 8 or 9 speed gearing with a granny gear, three water bottle mounts, and cantilever brakes.  I found all this and more with my current bicycle.  I have upgraded the entire drivetrain to give me even lower gears.  I have a Race Face mountain bike bike crank which I find is much stiffer and transfers power better.  I use 44 tooth, 32 tooth and 22 tooth chainrings in front.  I also have a wide range 11-32 tooth cassette out back.  I have taped over my stickers to make the bike look cheap and deter theft while commuting around town.

If I had it to do all over again there are other bicycles I would consider but for simplicity and reliability the Randonee works for me.

Have you obtained any other gear or are you still trying to get a bearing on which things to acquire and which things you can do without?  You may want to take a look at the touring bicycle buyers guide that Adventure Cycling produces.  It has some good tips on things to consider before purchasing a touring specific bicycle.

Don't let the myriad of choices deter you from getting involved. I started off with an old Bianchi racing bike and have slowly learned what works and what doesnt by riding and asking others.

Talk to ya soon.

Julian

Keep pedaling

Julian H.

12
General Discussion / sequoia for loaded touring
« on: July 29, 2004, 03:56:44 am »
Greetings,

I dont know firsthand if the Sequoia would be ideal for loaded touring.  My main concern is the lighweight wheelset that the bike comes with.  Even if you chose to pull your gear in a Bob trailer you may want to update the rear wheel at a minimum and also check into tires with more flat resistant tread. Otherwise if you feel the gearing is low enough to get you up and over hills okay you may be able to use it for some mid duty touring.  I have a Novara Randonee and although it is still more of an entry level touring rig, I feel its worth a look to get a frame with a longer rear triangle.  This gives you more clearance for the back of your feet and prevents kicking your rear panniers if you chose to use them at a later date.  
I would also check the following as they compare to more touring specific bicycles:
handlebar height in relation to seat height, try to level off both to prevent major leaning to reach brake and shiftlevers and also save your back in the process.
Make sure the gearing is low enough to climb hills.
consider a wider seat for more support

Feel free to write if you have more questions.



Keep pedaling

Julian H.

13
General Discussion / rain gear...for your bike
« on: July 29, 2004, 03:33:18 am »
Its a good idea to at least use a small tarp to cover the bicycle.  I will share this tip with you.  I often look for used tents at resale shops for 5 bucks or less.  I found one recently that I cut the main tent fly off of.   It is the same silicon based tarp material used in many of the lightweight tarp shelters by Go-Lite and mentioned in Ray Jardines lightweight backpacking book.  You can very easily cut the material to the desired shape and for little or no weight in the corner of one pannier you have an affordable bike covering.  I would also highly recommend a plastic bag for any leather saddles to protect them from the elements.

Happy riding.

Julian


14
General Discussion / What really is Adventure?
« on: July 29, 2004, 03:45:21 am »
This is a good question.  I ponder the thought of where I should go next and how to best prepare myself for the inevitable challenges I will face out on the road.  Being an african american bicyclist I am viewed a little differently.  I see other cyclists and I admire the welcome feelings they give one another. Often times I seek the same welcome but it isnt always there.  Cycling for me is a catalyst for change.  It shows others who arent distinctly aware of our presence in cycling that we too enjoy getting out, conquering hills and meeting new people in the great outdoors.  I look forward to seeing things on my bike.  It gets much better mileage than my truck and all of my stress just fades away with each passing hill.  I do my best thinking while pedaling.  I tend to liken bicycling with self discovery.  If you allow your mind to release while you pedal you will be that much more free when you hang it up for the night.  Adventure is about allowing yourself to discover more in this world without the predestined confines of work, home and your common social networks.  When was the last time you took in a sunset across town and looked down to discover you got there under your own power without burning any fuel?  A slower pace is what we need nowadays.  It will lengthen your life considerably.  Just slow down and relish the savory aspect of bicycling and you to will know what adventure is.

May everyone keep cycling and discovering more at each turn in the road.

Julian  


15
General Discussion / shipping BOB
« on: July 29, 2004, 03:59:04 am »
You may want to find a bicycle shop near your starting point and check in advance to see if they will let you ship it to their location for pickup.  Speak to a store manager and get his contact info.  This way you can pick up any last minute items if needed before embarking on your tour.

Hope this helps

Keep pedaling

Julian H.

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