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Messages - Pat Lamb

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46
Routes / Re: Underground Railroad Route??
« on: September 12, 2016, 09:22:24 am »
You can do the route to the southern border of Tennessee almost any time, except perhaps for the day every year (on average) when there's snow on the ground.

The weather changes drastically from there to northern Kentucky.  I wouldn't plan on hitting the Ohio River much before April 1, unless you like ice in the mornings.  You might get lucky earlier, but then again, maybe not.

Actually, if I were planning, I'd try to get to Tennessee the first two weeks of April to catch the azalea, dogwood, and magnolia blossoms.

47
I don't really know about the DWR stuff.  It's probably fine for 80% of what it's used for -- wind jacket, cool weather top layer, light rain, warm rain.  The last 20% is what I wonder about: cold rain.  When it's raining and 50 degrees so you're not sweating much, or when a thunderstorm on the high plains of Wyoming drops temperatures 30 degrees with 30 mph wind gusts, how much water will soak through and potentially cause hypothermia?

I'm not a fan of down for biking, and I don't remember meeting many, if any, cyclists wearing down.  I sweat too much to wear it on the bike, and I don't recommend carrying that pound and a half for camp-only wear.  Try to take multiple-use items, like a long polypropylene shirt, instead.  Wear it on the bike during cool days, cover it up with your rain jacket in camp, and it's easy to wash.

BTW, how goes the search for a bike?

48
and John Schubert is a friend of mine... I'll have to show him that he rates as one of the "better authors." :-)

Please do.  I'm afraid I took him for granted for too long -- knowledgeable, fair, and I suspect he was part of the annual touring bikes compendium that I studied for several years.

Nowadays, Adventure Cycling seems to reflect the schizophrenia within ACA itself.  I expect to read "Biking with Brown Bears" any issue now.  It'll be right after an announcement that some paved ACA route has moved off a four-lane road, recently paved, with daily traffic of 500 vehicles, because a parallel rail-trail opened up surfaced with leftover riprap, all because someone wrote an impassioned blog post on how uncomfortable they were riding on a road without a shoulder and sent a link to AC.  O'Grady's "reviews" are cute, but they're like "Buycycling for Touring Bikes;" slap a "touring" label on a kid's tricycle and he'll find two pages of lovely things to say about it.

Whew.  Makes me question why I'm still a member? 

49
I might flip through the older issues and cut out articles from some of the better authors -- Sheldon Brown, John Schubert, Willie Weir, for example.  The best of AC could fill a few file folders, and the rest could be recycled.

My wife would probably appreciate it if I'd do that this winter...

50
Gear Talk / Re: Single pair of shoes, or bike AND walking shoes?
« on: August 30, 2016, 10:12:33 am »
If I may interject a question, how do you stand staying in one pair of shoes all day?

I'd suggest you get to a podiatrist and get some properly fitting shoes.

Interesting, I've never heard of well-fitting shoes reducing foot sweating.

51
Gear Talk / Re: Single pair of shoes, or bike AND walking shoes?
« on: August 29, 2016, 06:22:24 pm »
If I may interject a question, how do you stand staying in one pair of shoes all day?  Maybe it's just my semi-tropical outlook, but one of bike riding's pleasures for me is getting my feet out of sweaty, stinking cycling shoes at the end of a ride.  Is Europe that much cooler than southern U.S.A. that you don't sweat, or do you take it so easy in Europe, or ...?

FWIW, I'm like that when I get home from work, winter or summer.

52
Food Talk / Re: to cook or not to cook?
« on: August 19, 2016, 10:13:57 pm »
My preference is to go to a restaurant, diner, etc. for breakfast and supper.  Lunch can be a hamburger or sandwich, or something picked up earlier on the trip -- an apple, a bit of cheese, and maybe some sausage or tuna on crackers is fine dining in the right surroundings (like under a tree 30 miles from the nearest diner).

It's probably a good idea to have some plans for the occasional meal-in-the-woods even if you plan not to cook.  There are places where there's nothing to eat where you may be forced to stop for the night, either by weather, fatigue, or the dreaded too-many-flats-to-get-there day.

53
Routes / Re: Western express to transAm
« on: August 07, 2016, 03:26:54 pm »
Bicycling in eastern Kentucky reminded me of the old computer game, Adventure?

You are in a maze of twisty little roads surrounded by mountains, all alike.

54
Gear Talk / Re: Davidson Titanium Road Bike
« on: August 05, 2016, 11:46:35 am »
Have you considered getting that lovely titanium road bike and then pulling a trailer with it?

55
Gear Talk / Re: Terry Touring Bikes - Coto Doñana Tour
« on: August 04, 2016, 10:37:11 am »
I'd take the Terry parts as her recommendations.  Without contacting Terry myself, I'd bet she'd either be happy to swap out parts the customer wants to change or to explain why the suggested change is a bad idea.  Every other builder I've talked with works that way.

Russ, I've always figured that anyone asking about buying a complete bike didn't have the mechanical experience to spec and to build their own bike.  Do you see any benefit to such a buyer, such as spec'ing compatible parts or having a single point of contact to fix anything that isn't quite right when they receive a complete bike?

Also, OP has said or implied she's looking at a total load (her plus luggage) of 150 pounds, on a 26" wheel.  I don't see that as enough of a load to drive 36 spokes as a hard requirement.  Could you explain why you think she needs 36 spoke wheels?

56
Gear Talk / Re: Terry Touring Bikes - Coto Doñana Tour
« on: August 03, 2016, 02:09:55 pm »
Oops, my bad.  Try rodbikes.com, especially the Adventure bike at http://www.rodbikes.com/catalog/adventure/adventure-main.html.

57
Not so, if your bike is set up right.

If you are comfortable using the drops while climbing and shifting bar end shifters with your hands still on the bars, then your bars are WAY too high.  You must have a 45 degree angle in your back while using the drops.  And a 90 degree back when using the hoods.  Your bars are way too high and probably your reach is too short.  In case you did not know, which I suspect you did not, when riding in the drops, with a slight bend in your elbow, your back should be flat, horizontal to the ground.  When your hands are on the hoods your back should be about 45 degrees to the ground.

ROFLMAO!  You're wrong, but keep the nonsense flowing, it's really entertaining.

No.  You have a very poorly fitted bike if you are comfortable climbing using the drops.  Unfortunately, poorly fitted bikes are very common.  Drops are used for getting aero.  Minimizing wind resistance.  You have to get your back flat to do that.  You cannot climb with your back flat and your eyes staring down at the road under the front wheel.  Breathing isn't as easy with your back flat.  Yet you claim to climb with your hands in the drops.  So when in the drops, you do not have a flat back.  You ride in the drops with your back at a 45 or 60 degree angle.  That is a poorly fitting bike.  I'd recommend you get a properly fitted bike.

Uh, no.  You're factually wrong about the angle my back is at in the drops.  You're also factually wrong with your assertion that "you have to get your back flat to do that."  If you remember high school geometry, the biggest difference in frontal area centered around 45 degrees, so going from 60 to 30 degrees gives you more bang for the buck than going from 45 to 15.  Sure, there's additional benefit to going lower, but the benefit is reduced as you go lower, and there's virtually no difference between 20 degrees up and horizontal.

My opinion is that you're also wrong about "correct" fitting.  Comfort and efficiency should be the guide, not some arbitrary advice that's great for time trials, but not at all appropriate for touring.  If I rode a bike fitting as you prescribe, I'd be uncomfortable, inefficient, and unable to ride all day.  Your advice is appropriate to a salesman dealing with a young racer wanna-be, the kind that wants a discount so he'll be able to get from Cat 5 to Cat 2 by the end of next season if you'll give him 50% off the latest carbon bike.  Oh, and can you throw in a power meter for free?  And arrange financing?

Or are you selling recumbents?

58
Gear Talk / Re: Terry Touring Bikes - Coto Doñana Tour
« on: August 03, 2016, 10:55:54 am »
I forgot to mention, I am a 5'1", 120 lb. woman, so a 30 lb. bike with another 30-50 lbs. of gear is relatively a bigger concern to me than a bigger rider (I think). So a savings of ~ 8-10 lbs. in bike alone is substantial.

Thanks for the personal details.  I'd guessed part because of Terry's focus, but your smaller size (at least compared to a basketball power forward!) makes a big difference.

Bruce Gordon is a respected touring frame builder who has opined that light top tubes in larger sizes are a cause of shimmy.  I'd guess you'll get a 50 cm or smaller bike, so I wouldn't worry about it on a bike designed by Terry and built by Waterford.

I think Russ' comments about crossing Iowa on a loaded touring bike vs. a sportier bike illustrate a potential benefit to going custom.  You could get a lighter bike, still with the capability to use wider tires to smooth rough roads, that might be more fun to ride unloaded.  Is it worth it?  Only you and your pocketbook can say.

FWIW, of the four production touring bikes I've tried, the sprightliest was the Fuji Touring, followed by Trek 520, Novara Randonee, and the Surly LHT.  I suspect the weight follows roughly the same order, so you really would be saving close to 8 pounds going from the Surly to the Terry.

Also FWIW, you might save a bit and still get full custom through rodcycles.com or bilenky.com.

59
Gear Talk / Re: Terry Touring Bikes - Coto Doñana Tour
« on: August 02, 2016, 05:20:58 pm »
If you'll excuse a few ruminations from someone who doesn't own that model...

First, do you have an idea what size bike you ride?  Full-on stock touring bikes in my size (roughly XL) run about 28 pounds.  I'm sure Terry/Waterford can get perhaps a pound to a pound and a half off frame weight by going to a better steel alloy on a smaller frame, and perhaps you can save 2-3 pounds more through reasonable component choices (lighter tires, light 26" vs. heavier 700C rims, etc.).  While I have great respect for the builder(s), I have to wonder what compromises they've made on longevity and weight-carrying capability to reduce the weight down to 20 pounds.  If you go too light on the frame, you risk getting a bike that shimmies with a heavy load at high speed.

How much do you plan to carry?  If you can keep your load down, perhaps to 30 pounds, and if you don't weigh too much (not going there, no way!), that light weight bike may work well for you.

Ms. Terry seems to understand touring, as evidenced by her eminently reasonable gearing.

Depending on front end geometry, a lighter weight bike might steer quicker and be more fun to ride unloaded than the truck-like steering of the LHT.  That would make it a better choice for training rides and fun rides before and after a long tour.

(Did I raise more questions than I answered?)

60
Not so, if your bike is set up right.

If you are comfortable using the drops while climbing and shifting bar end shifters with your hands still on the bars, then your bars are WAY too high.  You must have a 45 degree angle in your back while using the drops.  And a 90 degree back when using the hoods.  Your bars are way too high and probably your reach is too short.  In case you did not know, which I suspect you did not, when riding in the drops, with a slight bend in your elbow, your back should be flat, horizontal to the ground.  When your hands are on the hoods your back should be about 45 degrees to the ground.

ROFLMAO!  You're wrong, but keep the nonsense flowing, it's really entertaining.

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