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Messages - TwoWheeledExplorer

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256
General Discussion / Intro to Dirt Touring
« on: June 27, 2006, 01:55:10 am »
Yep, I just re-checked it. "100% paved" Musta been a typo. Glad you enjoyed it.

Hans

257
General Discussion / Intro to Dirt Touring
« on: June 26, 2006, 11:30:27 am »
I'm curious why the trip was listed as "100% Paved" in the 2006 Adventure Book? Was that a typo? How much time did you actually spend riding?

Thanks,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

258
General Discussion / I'm new; need help!
« on: June 18, 2006, 05:03:23 pm »
Janice,
I would agree with the others on all the main points. You might ask, however, what the difference is between a Schwinn (or Iron Horse, DBR, etc.)from a local Target/Wal-Mart/K-Mart or one from a local bike shop? The answer is assembly, knowlege and service. With a bike shop, your bike will be put together by people who know what they are doing, know your brand (May even ride it themselves) and want you to keep coming back, so they will give you regular tune-ups, life-time adjustments, and work with you on things like saddles, seat posts handlebars, grips, pedals and such so that your bike is most comfortable for you.

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

259
General Discussion / Knee Pain Advice
« on: May 15, 2006, 05:39:25 pm »
In police cyclist training they taught us if your knees hurt your seat is too high and if your thighs hurt your seat is too low.

Is your seat adjusted correctly?

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

260
REI got back to me yesterday. They have sold out of Novara Safaris at this time and do not expect any more until August.

Grrrr.
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

261
My mistake; I meant the Beckman Great Divide Tour, not the Bruce Gordon. Supposed to be a great bike, built for the Great Divide specifically, but you have to call Bob by phone to get any serious info. (http://www.coinet.com/~beckman/sakkit26.html)

The Surly LHT (Long Haul Trucker) is a frame capable of using 29 inch MTB tires/wheels. (http://www.surlybikes.com/longhaul.html)

The REI/Novara Safari appears to be out of production. I don't know what to tell you, or me, because I was seriously considering one. I sent REI an inquiry, and should hear back by Monday evening.

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

262
Bruce Gordon "Rock and Road", Surley LHT, or the REI/Novara Safari are certainly worth the look.

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 5-19-06 @ 7:40 AM

263
General Discussion / Right bike for mtn biking and one TransAm trip?
« on: April 15, 2006, 07:47:51 pm »
TomB wrote on 04-15-2006 @ 12:13 PM "My observation is, that "touring bicycle" is dissapearing, people using mountain bikes and hybrids."

Actually, compared to 9 years ago, there were 11 more solo dedicated touring bike models listed in the current Buyers Guide issue of Adventure Cyclist than in the March 1997 issue. Not a "boom" by any means, but definitely not "disappearing" either.

That guy from Texas with the seven yellow shirts has re-energized the "road" sector of bicycling, and road bikes are now out-selling mountain bikes. The touring bikes are part of that "road" sector.

I have had several mountain bikes and bought my first road bike, a Marin Venezia, last year, which I love to ride. I am looking at a touring-specific bike either later this summer or next spring. Yes, I am a Lance fan, but he is not at all why I bought the Marin. This organization (ACA) has more to do with it than anything.

Check out the March issue of AC for a good listing of the available options for road (and a couple of off-road) touring bikes. If you are buying a new MTB, look for one with a 43-45 chainstay and comfortable geometry for long rides.

Ride safe,
Hans

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 4-18-06 @ 7:20 PM

264
General Discussion / Right bike for mtn biking and one TransAm trip?
« on: April 14, 2006, 04:02:03 pm »
I would agree for something like a trans-Am trip to go with the BoB or Burley trailer for a MTB. For off-pavement touring, I still only use rear panniers. The BoB is okay, but I don't like the "runaway semi" feeling I get on steep downhills, particularly on singletrack.

The longer the wheelbase of your bike, be it road or MTB, the smoother the ride you'll have. (One of the reasons a Suburban rides smoother than a Jeep) You will also want a more upright stem and bars, with good barends (like a police bike) so you are not in an MTB racing position all day, every day.

Ride safe,
Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

265
General Discussion / MSR Velo Tent
« on: April 06, 2006, 06:05:05 pm »
Has anyone out there tried the MSR Vello tent they showed in AC last month?

Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

266
General Discussion / How to survive weather on the Northern Tier
« on: April 04, 2006, 11:07:23 am »
I would, for the most part, agree with Paul. I have lived Minnesota for almost 20 years and seen some pretty mean storms. I also went to college in Oklahoma. Yet the closest I ever came to a tornado was in my native New York, when a small funnel skipped along the hilltops, literally through our backyard, and into town.

I carry a small Motorola FRS radio with NOAA Weather Radio channels. You can buy them for less than $50.00 USD, and they work pretty much nation-wide. Skies get dark, the radio gets turned on. Some have a storm alert feature, and if it goes off, it's time to seek shelter. I wear it on the sternum strap of my hydration pack.

Ride safe,
Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

267
General Discussion / shake down ride
« on: March 21, 2006, 09:43:37 am »
Badger and all
That applies to all of us, whether we are world bike travelers, or on our first 30 miles. You have to get ready for biking, just like you had to for skiing or snowshoeing back in November. For instance, I got new panniers over the winter and now I am re-working my weight and balance issues before I try them out. I am also leaning towards a new touring bike this year (See post in "Gear" section.) that's going to require a whole lot'a shakin' down. ;p
So shake it down! But...

Ride safe,
Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

268
General Discussion / Safety-- women travellers
« on: March 15, 2006, 09:40:34 am »
As a law enforcement officer (park ranger) I would strongly urge you to NOT carry a handgun with you from state to state. The laws on carrying a weapon vary widely from state to state, and in some states you could be arrested just for coming across the border with it in your immediate possesion. Let me suggest this, instead; You are going into grizzly bear country...you should have a can of bear pepper spray if you will be on the road/trail during the summer month in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. Just keep it with you afterwards. It works on people, too. (I doubt you will need it for bears or people, but it should give you some reassurance.)

You don't say when you are planning your trip, but we are having a "bikpacking" workshop at Lake Maria State Park, outside of Monticello, (45 miles NW of Mlps. via I-94) on June 17th at noon. Cost is only 5 bucks. (plus park entry) More info at www.trailpatrol.org

Ride safe,
Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

269
General Discussion / first aid kits
« on: March 15, 2006, 10:26:56 am »
Wilderness first aid classes are better for anyone who will be any distance from normal EMS response. They can be found through Google or local outdoors stores and clubs.

OTC Benadryl is good. Epinephrine (Epi-pen) is a prescription item, which is not an issue if you (and your doctor) know you have a bee sting (or other anaphylatic) allergies. Otherwise you may have to convince a doc why you need it.

Other over-the-counter meds I carry are:
Analgesics: (pain pills)

Aspirin: 1 a day keeps the heart attack or stroke away if no allergy, bleeding, ulcers or other reason. 2 every 4 hrs. for fever or minor pain. (Don't use aspirin in kids without medical advice
Ibuprofen: Basically the same effects as aspirin though not usually given for the blood thinning effect. Better pain relief, fever control and antiinflammatory effect than aspirin. Somewhat less stomach upset but still causes that.
Tylenol: (acetaminophen) Only good for fever and minor pain.

Anti-histamines: (for allergies, itch, nausea and sea-sickness)

Benadryl for anything that itches or sneezes, e.g. hay fever, allergies. 25-50 mg. every 4 hrs.
Meclizine 12.5-25 mg. (Dramamine II): motion sickness

Decongestants:

Afrin spray: For nasal congestion.
Pseudoephedrine (30-60 mg. every 4-6 hrs) for nasal congestion

(I also carry "Contac" for severe cold/allergy symptoms.)

Gastrointestinal Medications:

Rolaids or Tums (Liquid are more effective, but tablets are easier to carry.)
Acid neutralizers: Zantac or Pepcid or generic equals
Dulcolax: For constipation
Imodium AD: (Loperamide)For diarrhea.
 
Skin Meds:

Antiinflamatory:2 1/2% cortisone cream

Antibiotic ointment:Bacitracin, polysporin,

Antifungal: Lotrimin or clotrimazole

Note: I only cary a few of these each...not the whole package. from 24 Ibuprofen to 2 Contac. 4-10 of everything else.

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 3-15-06 @ 7:31 AM

270
General Discussion / first aid kits
« on: March 09, 2006, 05:12:01 pm »
Hmmmm..."OK Hans. What are the 'infamous "10 Essentials" '? Toilet paper, (you could use it to start a fire) a bottle of Rum, (Same ;p ) a lovely lass,(hypothermia prevention?) what?
Gramps"

Okay. All seriousity here:
The "Ten Essentials" were first put together by The Mountaineers in WA. For a long time they often varied by sport and season. A couple years ago they came out with this list that is more-or-less universal.

The Ten Essential Systems
 
The following list is made up of items that everyone who ventures onto a trail or into the backcountry should have. You could add more, possibly, but these are the basics.

1. Navigation (map and compass)
2. Sun protection
3. Insulation (extra clothing)
4. Illumination (flashlight/headlamp)
5. First-aid supplies
6. Fire
7. Repair kit and tools
8. Nutrition (extra food)
9. Hydration (extra water)
10. Emergency shelter
 
Ride safe,
Hans


 

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

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