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Messages - TwoWheeledExplorer

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256
General Discussion / Thorn Vs. Koga
« on: March 09, 2007, 06:03:49 pm »
The Koga-USA website lists a dealer in Chicago now, too. It looks like they are working towards more of a presence in the USA, from the way their site reads.

No matter...I like my Volpe.

Hans

National Mountain Bike Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

257
General Discussion / Thorn Vs. Koga
« on: March 08, 2007, 12:19:31 pm »
I believe Commuter Bicycles is the shop that John Seigel-Boettner and the students and staff of Santa Barbara Middle School use when setting up their cross-country bike trips. ("The biking-est school in America.") That should translate into knowing a thing or two about touring. You can get John's book, "Hey Mom, Can I Ride My Bike Across America" from the ACA store, or go to http://www.americanrediscovery.com/ about their 2002 Lewis and Clark Trail trip.

As for Travis' website, I don't think they started off with a sponsorship from Koga. They just shopped for the most durable bikes they could find.

Ride safe,
Hans

National Mountain Bike Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

258
General Discussion / Thorn Vs. Koga
« on: March 07, 2007, 11:39:19 am »
Check out Tim and Cindie Travis' website, http://www.downtheroad.org/ They have been traveling on Koga World Travelers non-stop since 2002, in four continents. If anybody has experience with using a Koga World Traveler for world travel, it would be the them.

Ride safe,
Hans

National Mountain Bike Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 3-7-07 @ 7:39 AM

259
General Discussion / Lots of hurting bikers out there
« on: August 07, 2006, 11:16:30 am »
You know, Pete's right. The first half-dozen or so discussions are about aches, pains and injuries. Wow...Maybe recumbents are the answer, but maybe there is something else: How many of you have ever had your bike custom fitted to your body? Most bike shops that even know how to do this, only do it on high-end road bike sales. The shop where I bought my new Bianchi Volpe does it for almost every (adult) bike they sell, and it has made so much difference, it's hard to believe. Then I exchanged the Bianchi saddle for an original WTB SST-2, which I feel is the most comfortable bike seat ever made. (Not to take anything from Brooks, but I love my SST) and the bike just about begs to be ridden.

So, before you go and spend lots of money on a 'bent, take that trusty upright mount into a top-end bike shop that knows something about touring and have them fit your bike to you. I think you will be surprised at the results.

Ride comfy,
Hans

Minnesota Backcountry Trails
www.wintersnowtrails.org

260
General Discussion / which bike to buy?
« on: June 29, 2006, 10:00:08 am »
...or for spite's sake, you could march back into the shop, take the current Trek catalog, open it to page 33 and ask the same guy if that's the bike Trek doesn't make any more? Tell him he cost his shop a sale and leave. Better yet, the Trek 520 is a bit over $1,000.00 MSRP, but if he wants the sale he owes you a good discount!

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

261
General Discussion / which bike to buy?
« on: June 29, 2006, 12:06:25 am »
Julian,
First off, he was full of poop. (Can I say that here?) Go to www.trekbikes.com and click on "touring". They still make the 520. Bianchi makes the Volpe. (www.bianchiusa.com/06_volpe.html) REI/Novara makes the Randonee. (www.rei.com/rei/gearshop/novara/index.html) Fuji makes the Fuji Touring (www.fujibikes.com/2006/bikes.asp?id=143) And those are just the stock touring bikes under $1,000.00! There are a whole list of stock, semi-custom and custom touring bikes running from 1200 bucks to whatever you want to pay. Go to the Adventure Cycling website by clicking on the bottom of the page, and head into the magazine archives, find the 2006 Buyers Guide for all the latest info and models. The Trek, Bianchi and Novarra are really good bikes to start touring on. Strong, sturdy and built to carry a load. Then if you like it you can keep riding that bike or move up to a Bruce Gordon, Waterford or Rivendell. You can find information on them all in Adventure Cyclist. Better yet, Join Adventure Cycling! You can do that on the website too!

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

262
General Discussion / Intro to Dirt Touring
« on: June 27, 2006, 01:55:10 am »
Yep, I just re-checked it. "100% paved" Musta been a typo. Glad you enjoyed it.

Hans

263
General Discussion / Intro to Dirt Touring
« on: June 26, 2006, 11:30:27 am »
I'm curious why the trip was listed as "100% Paved" in the 2006 Adventure Book? Was that a typo? How much time did you actually spend riding?

Thanks,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

264
General Discussion / I'm new; need help!
« on: June 18, 2006, 05:03:23 pm »
Janice,
I would agree with the others on all the main points. You might ask, however, what the difference is between a Schwinn (or Iron Horse, DBR, etc.)from a local Target/Wal-Mart/K-Mart or one from a local bike shop? The answer is assembly, knowlege and service. With a bike shop, your bike will be put together by people who know what they are doing, know your brand (May even ride it themselves) and want you to keep coming back, so they will give you regular tune-ups, life-time adjustments, and work with you on things like saddles, seat posts handlebars, grips, pedals and such so that your bike is most comfortable for you.

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

265
General Discussion / Knee Pain Advice
« on: May 15, 2006, 05:39:25 pm »
In police cyclist training they taught us if your knees hurt your seat is too high and if your thighs hurt your seat is too low.

Is your seat adjusted correctly?

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

266
REI got back to me yesterday. They have sold out of Novara Safaris at this time and do not expect any more until August.

Grrrr.
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

267
My mistake; I meant the Beckman Great Divide Tour, not the Bruce Gordon. Supposed to be a great bike, built for the Great Divide specifically, but you have to call Bob by phone to get any serious info. (http://www.coinet.com/~beckman/sakkit26.html)

The Surly LHT (Long Haul Trucker) is a frame capable of using 29 inch MTB tires/wheels. (http://www.surlybikes.com/longhaul.html)

The REI/Novara Safari appears to be out of production. I don't know what to tell you, or me, because I was seriously considering one. I sent REI an inquiry, and should hear back by Monday evening.

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

268
Bruce Gordon "Rock and Road", Surley LHT, or the REI/Novara Safari are certainly worth the look.

Ride safe,
Hans

www.trailpatrol.org

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 5-19-06 @ 7:40 AM

269
General Discussion / Right bike for mtn biking and one TransAm trip?
« on: April 15, 2006, 07:47:51 pm »
TomB wrote on 04-15-2006 @ 12:13 PM "My observation is, that "touring bicycle" is dissapearing, people using mountain bikes and hybrids."

Actually, compared to 9 years ago, there were 11 more solo dedicated touring bike models listed in the current Buyers Guide issue of Adventure Cyclist than in the March 1997 issue. Not a "boom" by any means, but definitely not "disappearing" either.

That guy from Texas with the seven yellow shirts has re-energized the "road" sector of bicycling, and road bikes are now out-selling mountain bikes. The touring bikes are part of that "road" sector.

I have had several mountain bikes and bought my first road bike, a Marin Venezia, last year, which I love to ride. I am looking at a touring-specific bike either later this summer or next spring. Yes, I am a Lance fan, but he is not at all why I bought the Marin. This organization (ACA) has more to do with it than anything.

Check out the March issue of AC for a good listing of the available options for road (and a couple of off-road) touring bikes. If you are buying a new MTB, look for one with a 43-45 chainstay and comfortable geometry for long rides.

Ride safe,
Hans

This message was edited by Trailpatrol on 4-18-06 @ 7:20 PM

270
General Discussion / Right bike for mtn biking and one TransAm trip?
« on: April 14, 2006, 04:02:03 pm »
I would agree for something like a trans-Am trip to go with the BoB or Burley trailer for a MTB. For off-pavement touring, I still only use rear panniers. The BoB is okay, but I don't like the "runaway semi" feeling I get on steep downhills, particularly on singletrack.

The longer the wheelbase of your bike, be it road or MTB, the smoother the ride you'll have. (One of the reasons a Suburban rides smoother than a Jeep) You will also want a more upright stem and bars, with good barends (like a police bike) so you are not in an MTB racing position all day, every day.

Ride safe,
Hans

Hans Erdman, WEMT
Backcountry Trail Patrol-MN
www.trailpatrol.org

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