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Messages - John Nettles

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256
General Discussion / i would love some advice
« on: October 24, 2006, 12:13:20 pm »
I have crossed the country on the pacific coast, northern tier, trans-am, and east coast (older route) along with some "my design" routes.  I did the northern tier in 65 days but it was a tad rough as the miles get high per riding day.  Remember, you will need/want to take a day off every 7-10 to rest, sightsee, etc. so the riding average can really get up there.

I agree with valygirl that you can consider other "cross country" routes.  You also have the Great River route in central but have only done a portion of it.

Another option is to consider a multi-country route, i.e. Pueblo, CO (or Jackson, WY to save time) to Jasper, AB but you would want to plan on rest days every 5-7 days due to the wonderful national parks you would be visiting.

You are smart buying a used high-end touring bike.  I use a 17 year-old Bruce Gordon that is probably better than most new bikes.  Be sure you have strong wheels, good racks, buy used decent packs (Beckman or Arkel), and tent/sleeping bag.  You can put the money into other areas instead of a new bike.

Be sure to plan a few days back home before you return to work to readjust to "life".  Numerous funny stories of how we have to readjust, i.e. not thinking about taking TP with you in case there is any.

Have a wonderful trip!

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

257
General Discussion / The Ditty Bops...
« on: October 02, 2006, 01:48:51 pm »
Pretty neat site.


Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

258
General Discussion / going south
« on: October 03, 2006, 02:02:10 pm »
I understand about the bus versus riding.  I just wouldn't want to freeze my ball bearings off riding in the snow when I could be in the sun :).

Regarding the passes along the continental divide, they could still be cold at night (in the mid 20s)but dry in mid-December (I estimated your ETA).  Daytime high average around 55-65 along the Mexico/AZ/NM border.  Obviously, the further north you go, the colder it gets.

I know there is a strong ex-pat population around Puerto Penasco just south of AZ along the Gulf of California.

Hope you enjoy your trip!

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

259
General Discussion / going south
« on: October 02, 2006, 01:40:19 pm »
If you are saying you want to ride the Great Divide or any mountain passes for that matter in December, you had better have tremendous fortitude :).  Most non-major road passes could be closed due to snow then but depending on luck, route, etc. I guess it could be done but it would be something I would not enjoy.

If you are wanting to get south for the winter, I would suggest a bus as the extra food you will eat to stay warm will be less than the bus fare.  Additionally, you will have more time in a better climate.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

260
General Discussion / Seeking advice on bringing a bike from Europe to U
« on: September 27, 2006, 10:02:47 am »
Depnding on where you are landing in the USA, you might contact a local bike shop there and see if you can ship there and they can assemble it and have it ready for your trip.  UPS is much less likely to damage it compared to any airline and you can get insurance for it pretty cheaply.

Perhaps there is a ACA member in that area willing to have you ship it to them????

I did the trip back in '87.  Hope you enjoy your trip!

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

261
General Discussion / Dalton Boys
« on: September 22, 2006, 12:06:22 pm »
Sorry to post to everyone but I am trying to get in touch with Mark but his email is private.

Therefore Mark, I have some questions I would like to email/phone you about riding in Texas.  Can you email me at nettles@cox.net at your leisure?

Again, sorry to everyone else.  Thanks!

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

262
General Discussion / cycling on the interstates
« on: September 12, 2006, 12:06:36 pm »
While I agree some situations are unavoidable and should be explored for allowing cyclists, I still say a cyclist should generally not be on an interstate.  I would rather put my legal efforts toward places that apply to all cyclists not just a few.

Additionally, there is no way it can be a 56 ADDITIONAL mile detour to go from Hannibal, MO to Pittsfield, IL (assuming you were traveling thru, not just crossing the river).  Sometimes, your mode of travel dictates certain limitations. How come boats never have hills :).

I personally would not have traveled on US36 when there are better cyclists friendly roads that basically go the same direction, albiet with some extra mileage.  I'm not putting you down, but I prefer to look at the landscape not at the traffic.  

Finally, while you are an experienced cyclist, I would be worried about a novice who rides on it just because we have the right.  Right or wrong doesn't matter if your are dead.

Again, just my two cents worth.

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

263
General Discussion / cycling on the interstates
« on: September 11, 2006, 05:00:55 pm »
While I can certainly understand the problem with old roads becoming interstates (the old Route 66 has been converted to interstates in most areas, I personally believe cyclists should not be on interstates unless there is no reasonable (detour of 30+ miles) alternative, i.e. in Wyoming on the TransAm route.  Besides, interestates are SO boring.

I certainly agree with you about the right to use most roads but a blanket "we get access to everything" is not a wise decision IMHO.


Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

264
General Discussion / Camping on private land
« on: September 01, 2006, 12:57:23 pm »
I have always thought it would be great if AC could do a campground development program with communities and locals on the route.

For instance, people could offer to allow cyclists to pitch a tent in their backyard.  Churches, city parks, police/fire stations, etc. could have an actual camp pad on their property.

I would be happy to pay a reasonable amount for this per night plus it helps the local communities that may not have a local campground.  Ideally, these would be spread out every 15-20 miles so almost anyone could find a camp.  It would cost $200 max for a picnic table, some railroad ties and dirt (to create a raised pad), and a tree or two.

I know it is a dream but I can always dream :).

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

265
General Discussion / suggestions for mapping needed for fundraiser
« on: August 24, 2006, 09:05:31 pm »
Hi Tina,

You never indicated how much experience with riding and/or touring you have.  Also, you indicated you have "support" but that could be financial, vehicle, press/PR, etc.

With MANY years of experience, you could probably use a regular AAA road map and have a good idea of a route but it would not be the shortest as-the-crow-flies but shortest as a bike rides.

You could perhaps look at the archives of cross state bike routes.  For instance, Oklahoma, KS, GA, etc. have annual rides across the state. However, most bypass the large cities on purpose.

Additionally, 650 a week while touring for 10 straight weeks would be very tiring.  And that is assuming the 6500 miles was a realistic distance, not a Mapquest distance.  650 miles a week is almost a century a day plus I assume you have "downtime" for the fundraising, rest day (yes your body will require rest days), etc.

This would NOT be a fun trip at all even if you had total support, i.e. someone doing all work and you just ride and smile for cameras.  Are you hoteling it at least??

I would strongly recommend either lengthening your time, or cutting some states.

I don't want to dissuade you from your goal but a goal needs to be obtainable :).


Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

266
General Discussion / Safety/money/ATMs/Cash/Traveler's Checks/etc.
« on: November 04, 2005, 08:38:25 am »
I tend to do a combo of the three.  I keep a small amount of cash (around $100) stuffed somewhere in my panniers, start the trip with about 25% of the estimated trip's total expenses in travelers checks i.e. if the trip is estimated to cost $1000, I get about $250 in travelers cheques (get them free as a AAA member), and use the ATM/debit card for the rest.

This gives me flexibility.  If I hit the boonies for a few days and don't have access to an ATM, I have cash.  While not everyplace accepts Travelers Cheques, most do (especially tourist related businesses like campgrounds).  If they get lost/stolen, they are replaced.  If I lose my ATM/debit card (done that unfortunately), I still have access to some cash and travelers checks until the card is replaced.

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!  John



267
General Discussion / Southern Tier
« on: November 14, 2005, 06:47:37 pm »
Another option is to UPS it where you are staying the first night when you arrive, assuming you are not going to ride out as soon as you arrive.

If you are getting a hotel the first night, it gives you a quiet & private place to reassemble.  If possible, pick a hotel/motel close to a bike shop in case the "loving care" the airlines give you is not so loving.

TulsaJohn

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn

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