Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - WesternFlyer

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 8
16
Connecting ACA Routes / Portland to Pac. Coast Route?
« on: October 24, 2008, 01:58:43 pm »
Because Portland is such a bike centric city there are tons of well ridden routes to the Pacific and many more waiting for the adventurous biker to discover.  There is a free Oregon state bicycle map available from the ODOT that can give you some ideas. http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/HWY/BIKEPED/maps.shtml#ODOT_Maps

I road the along side the Nestucca River from Carlton to Beaver a two falls ago.  It was a delightful ride with lots of NFS campgrounds.  There are lots of ways to ride to Carlton or Yamhill including mass transit.  Theres a tasty, moderately priced Italian restaurant in Carlton for lunch.

If you are really adventurous try getting a copy of the Sinuslaw National Forest Map, some dirt tires and go for a new route.


Western Flyer

A wise traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent upon arriving.
           Lao Tzu

17
Urban Cycling / commuting by bike
« on: April 13, 2008, 03:13:39 am »
I don't work any more so I voted for my wife who rides about 18 miles round trip almost everyday except in the worst weather in Portland, Oregon.  Now I do the shopping and the like by bike and try and get the grandkids to come along.

Western Flyer

A wheel spins in a circle.
The still point at the center
gives it direction.
Be still.

   "The Parents' Tao Te Ching"

18
Youth Bicyle Travel / Help needed
« on: April 13, 2008, 03:01:13 am »
There doesnt seem to be too much action on the youth forum.  And that is really a sad commentary on real outdoor adventure that todays youth is missing.   This thread was started in 06!  Mikes three oldest are now 19,18 and 16 more or less.  My advice to Mike and other parents of teenager is to let them go it alone.  Let them earn some money for the trip, maybe pay for the transportation to the starting point, and give them cell phones and an ATM card.  I hate to breach the news to parents, but your children have to break-away on their own sometime.

When I was 16 years old, a high school mate and I road from Canada to Mexico entirely on our own, and we not only made it but it became a beacon that guides me to this day.  That was in 1963.  We were in three newspapers on the way and the TV cameras were rolling as we crossed the Mexican boarder.  Our local bike shop posted a map tracking our progress (posted on the bike shop wall, not the internet!).

As I road down the Oregon coast last summer I asked myself if I would feel ok letting my grandchildren take such a ride un-chaperoned when they reach their teens.  Times certainly have changed, but absolutely!  At least for the Pacific Coast route it is far safer today than it was forty-five years ago.


Western Flyer

A wheel spins in a circle.
The still point at the center
gives it direction.
Be still.

   "The Parents' Tao Te Ching"

19
Gear Talk / new crankset
« on: December 26, 2008, 01:25:01 am »
I ride with a set of Race Face 110/74 with 46/34/24 chainwheels and a 11-34 cassette and love it.  The Race Face is CNC milled and is butter smooth.  You will not find yourself setting any land speed records with the tallest gears, but I do find I use the 46 much more and in different gear combinations than I ever did a 48 or 50.

Western Flyer

We must ride light and swift.  It is a long road ahead.

King Theoden

20
Gear Talk / Rear bike rack
« on: November 30, 2008, 02:33:17 am »
I use a Tubus Logo.  I would recommend it to anyone hauling a heavy load.  I use it routinely to haul groceries at much higher weights than I carry while touring.  It is strong, stable, light weight, and very adaptable to different frames and panniers.  It was not cheap, but comes with a great warranty. I bought mine from a local bike shop, but it is available online at TheTouringStore.com

21
Gear Talk / Touring Bike
« on: November 20, 2008, 11:48:11 am »
I put a 1.25 Panaracer and a 1 Hutchinson 26 road tires on my wifes mtb for the paved portion of a seven day paved/dirt ride around the Crater Lake area of southern Oregon.  They worked great on some very standard mtb rims.

Western Flyer

A wise traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent upon arriving.
           Lao Tzu

22
Gear Talk / Touring Bike
« on: November 13, 2008, 11:08:26 pm »

Quote

There are only a handful of companies that build frames.


I think the more correct answer is there are hundreds of companies that have a few companies making their frames.  For all but the high-end bikes you would really have to do some serious research to find out who actually made what bicycle.  What you are really buying is a particular logo and branding that appeals to you.  Much like choosing between Nike and Adidas shoes both of which are manufactured by nameless offshore sweatshops, in various parts of Asia.

Surly, in their blog, states that they tried to find a USA manufacturer to work with them, but no one showed much interest and had to go to Taiwan.  Even top-end lines like Rivendell with the appearance of American made are almost entirely made in Asia.  

I ride a Bianchi Axis, which is a step up from the popular Volpe, but shares the same basic cyclocross geometry albeit with an aluminum frame.  My Axis was produced and assembled in an Export Processing Zone (EPZ) in Taiwan. The following is its lineage as far as my research has been able to inform me. (Others are welcome to correct or make additions.) The aluminum tubing was made in the United States  Easton, the carbon fiber forks were produced in Japan - probably Toray Composites. The drive train and other components are Japanese and Taiwanese with some of the parts subcontracted to Indonesia - Shimano, Sugino and Sram. The wheel sets and tires were junk from Korea and subject to a recall. The SPD compatible pedals were of unknown origin and fell apart quickly.

It was designed by a woman, Sky Yaeger, AKA Chick Design, an employee of Bianchi USA, in Hayward CA, which is a licensed logo branding agent of the F.I.V. Bianchi Company, which is wholly owned subsidiary the Cycleurope Group, which is controlled by the Swedish holding company Grimaldi Industri AB.  Bianchi no longer exits as a bicycle manufacturer, but my bike came with eleven (11!) official, brightly displayed, Bianchi logos.

I think you will find a similar maze for most lower and mid level bikes on the market today.  If we get too loyal to a particular brand then we have been had.

All that said I love riding my bike.
 

 



Western Flyer

A wise traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent upon arriving.
           Lao Tzu

23
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: November 07, 2008, 02:15:10 am »
You dont have a second burner or wait for the burner to cool.  Because alcohol mixes with water you can pour a little water into the burner to cool it instantly and then fill it with alcohol.  The water even makes the flame burn cleaner.  You can mix up to 10% water with the alcohol.

24
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: October 27, 2008, 12:23:15 am »
Almost any # 2 or #5 polyethylene bottle will hold alcohol safely assuming the top is secure and seals well.  Oddly enough not all aluminum fuel bottles are compatible with alcohol.  I know Sigg and Trangia have alcohol compatible aluminum bottles and probably other manufactures have them as well, but check with the manufacturer.  Your local REI salesperson may not know, or assume if it can hold gasoline and kerosene it must be all right for alcohol.

Another consideration is that denatured ethanol is generally sold in quarts (32 oz) cans and most bike bottles are 22 to 28 ounces.  Zefal makes a 1 litter (33oz) standard bike cage compatible bottle but a review on The Bike Forum had a number of people saying the top leaked (not good).  Others said it sealed fine, but sealed fine for water and alcohol are two different standards.  Im going to try one and see.  The original can, although a little heavier, is plenty secure and can easily and safely be recycled when empty, and that is not true of all fuel cans and canisters.

The best way to keep fuel from spilling in your panniers is to not put it there, although alcohol is much less the disaster than gasoline and kerosene are.  The former is water-soluble without the need for detergents to clean up, and leaves no odor.

Western Flyer

  Cooking is like that.  Barbara Kingsolver

25
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: October 24, 2008, 01:21:43 pm »
CampSaver.com offers generic malleable aluminum windscreens you can customize to you burner/stove at a good price.  I use one with my Trangia Spirit Burner when biking to save weight and space, and it does decrease cooking time.  I used a standard paper punch to put two rows of holes about halfway around the bottom of the screen to get a better draft.

http://www.campsaver.com/ItemMatrix.asp?GroupCode=trd0002&MatrixType=1

Western Flyer

26
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: October 09, 2008, 02:14:37 pm »
If you use an alcohol stove please read the Zen Stoves website about various types of alcohol based fuels and possible toxicity of some fuels like HEET!

http://zenstoves.net/Stoves.htm

I have used a Trangia alcohol stove for nearly 40 years http://www.trangia.se/english/.  It has never failed me.  I have pulled up on a beach in my kayak, emptied the burner of salt water, filled it with ethanol in the pouring rain and wind and had dinner cooking in less than a minute.  I did replace the simmer ring this year because the rivet, after years of abuse and salt water, finally corroded through.  What I like about it most is its quietness.  Striking the match is the loudest noise you will hear.

Western Flyer

27
Gear Talk / Ortlieb Dry Bag
« on: January 03, 2009, 01:20:49 am »
In my working life I was a sail maker and an industrial textile designer, and I can say with certainty that nylon and other synthetic fabrics cannot mildew.  However, food and other organic matter that get onto and into the fabric can mildew.  Keeping a tent as clean as possible is more important than as dry as possible.

The silicon-impregnated nylons are a real advancement for lightweight camping.  Where urethane coated nylon is impenetrable to water it allows the nylon yarns to saturated with water and organic matter.  It takes time to dry out.  Silnylon keep water and organic matter from getting between the threads of the yarn by keeping rain, dew and condensation on the surface of the fabric on both sides.  I met a cyclist last summer who carried one of those synthetic chamois you see advertised on late-night TV.  He went completely over the fly of his tent in the  morning and I am telling you it was pretty close to dry to the touch when he was done.  That is more hassle than I want.  I just give the fly a good shaking and stuff it in with the rest of the tent.


Western Flyer

We must ride light and swift.  It is a long road ahead.

King Theoden

28
Gear Talk / MTB tires
« on: August 12, 2008, 07:51:18 pm »
Why not take both dirt and road tires and enjoy the best of both worlds.  For a five day ride depending where you are going you should bring an extra tire anyhow so you would be taking two extras instead of one.  

My wife and I are going to be riding around the Klamath Basin in early September, self supported.  There will be 80 plus miles on the old OC&E railroad bed and some National Forest dirt roads and trails, and a lot of paved roads including Crater Lake (if the snow ever melts).

For my wife's MTB she will have 1 5/8 x 26 dirt tires and a 1" Hutchinson Top Slick 2 front and 1 1/4" Panaracer T Serve rear street tires.  I will be running a very similar tire set up on my cyclocross bike with 700mm rims.  

After a week of riding, hiking, and birding she will take the Amtrak back to Portland and I will follow the Klamath River with lots of side trips on National Forest roads using my dirt tires and eventually end up on the Pacific Coast and head down Highways 101 and 1 to Moro Bay, California with street tires.  And if I see a dirt or gravel road that looks like it needs exploring it takes only a few minutes to change tires for the adventure.  

There are several inner tubes that can span narrow to wide tires so you only need one extra tube or how ever many extra tubes you normally carry.


Western Flyer

It was to such a land I rode.
       L Eiseley

This message was edited by WesternFlyer on 8-12-08 @ 4:58 PM

29
Gear Talk / Water bottles and bisephenol-A
« on: November 03, 2008, 02:47:36 am »
I meant this thread to be somewhat lighthearted reflection of a greater nation wide controversy.  I dont think this forum is the place for an in depth deconstruction of the plastics industrys footprint on the American food chain.  And I am certainly not an expert or even a well studied observer.  I am generally concerned about the chemical soup we ingest on a daily basis.  

I started out trying to buy a 1.5 liter Sigg aluminum water bottle for my bicycle and found I couldnt get one because Julia Roberts showed up on the Oprah TV show with a Sigg bottle in hand and told everybody to get one, and apparently they all did.  This happened at the same time as the State of California came out with studies linking BPA to various maladies in children and babies.  Soon a perfect storm was brewing.  If you dont believe me just look up water bottles on the REI website. http://www.rei.com/

I would have never brought it up here except it was effecting my bicycling.  So I apologize if I caused any undue worries, or my presentation was mostly anecdotal with little scientific footnoting.  


Western Flyer

A wise traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent upon arriving.
           Lao Tzu

30
Gear Talk / Water bottles and bisephenol-A
« on: October 30, 2008, 04:24:50 pm »
I was going to let this topic disappear into the deep ACA archives after the FDA came out officially stating that BPA posses no health risk, and the fact you would be hard pressed,  today, to find any brand name bike bottle that doesnt openly claim to be BPA free.  But in todays Oregonian (Portlands daily newspaper) is an Associated Press story stating the FDAs science when put under peer review was found to be faulty.  It went on to say Canada has banned BPA in baby bottles.

I also know that bottled water clearly states in the fine print not to refill them, and this is supposedly because the rate of leaching increases with the handling of the bottles.  It seems logical that the rate of leaching at some point would have to decrease as the bottles are reused over time.  

Anecdotally: I took a long day ride last weekend and couldnt find my fancy Swiss water bottle so I filled a no-name plastic bottle I was given at the Seattle to Portland, STP, charity ride last summer.  The taste of plastic was very strong.

Western Flyer

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 8