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Messages - Westinghouse

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856
General Discussion / Re: Winter Pacific Coast tour
« on: January 10, 2009, 02:34:04 am »
I have considered doing the PCBR in winter too. I looked up the winter weather, and got some word from people who know weather conditions in that region in winter. The general consensus was---don't do it in winter. Can you do it? Yes, most likely. There may be numerous setbacks due to stormy, wet, cold weather, and snow, but it can be done. They say some really severe storms can sweep in.

857
Connecting ACA Routes / Portland to Pac. Coast Route?
« on: December 28, 2008, 07:37:59 am »
Just about any roadmap will give you the way. I have done the PCBR three times. Once I went from Seattle to about half way through Oregon where my girlfriend had such a bad case of tendinitis we had to quit and drive back to Florida. Next, I went back myself, and carried on from Portland to San Diego, a really fantastic, great ride. Third, I cycled from Arcata, California to Santa Cruz, CA. I flew to China after that.

Getting from Portland to the PCBR is the easiest thing in the world to do. You can also go south to get on I-5, and criss cross it visiting interesting towns along the way, take 38 at Drain, OR, and enter the PCBR west of Drain at Reedsport. The choice is yours.

This message was edited by Westinghouse on 12-28-08 @ 4:40 AM

858
Connecting ACA Routes / NYC to Cleveland: PENNSLYVANIA
« on: November 08, 2008, 10:59:46 am »
There are canal tow paths running across the southern tier of counties in Pennsylvania. I have done some reading on them. They are all off road and can be cycled. They run near towns. There is at least one hostel on the route, and places to camp, with water. This route starts in eastern PA and goes to Pittsburgh. In Ohio you can take a series of bike paths south. Cycle down to the Katy trail, and go its full length. Its southern terminus will let you out at the southeast corner of Kansas. Pick up the Transam route in three days or so and take it across Kansas to Colorado. Follow the TA from there on.

That is one way to do it to avoid as much traffic and pollution as possible.


859
Urban Cycling / Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
« on: October 11, 2008, 03:06:32 pm »
I know the places near LA you are writing about. Of course, I went through there while doing the PCBR, and stayed at a hostel in Venice Beach for a while. I thought it was great, especially after just having done the route all that way. There are some hot bodies in that part of the world, women that is. After cycling out of Venice I met a woman from Australia. We cycled a while together. It turned out her father was the Australian ambassabor to the United States. There was a guy juggling chain saws at Venice Beach. I cycled through there more than once, and on the second trip I also ran acrss some people who were looking for trouble. You can meet all kinds on a cycling tour.


860
Urban Cycling / why bike?
« on: October 18, 2008, 04:40:07 pm »
I can understand Boonebikeguy's attitude. In some places you are a nobody if you are traveling by bicycle. Drivers can be incredibly callous at times. Some places are better for cycling. Some places are worse.


861
Urban Cycling / why bike?
« on: October 17, 2008, 02:07:59 pm »
When I was very young, maybe ten, I dreamed of crossing the US by bicycle, but had long forgotten about anything like that. Then, much later, in the summer of 1983, I was on a sixty day Eurail trip around western Europe. I was staying in the youth hostel in Cherbourg, France, and waiting for the ship to take me over to Rosslare harbor into Ireland. I met a young  (18) German woman. We rented bicycles, and rode out to visit the Normandy coast where part of the D-day invasion had taken place many years before. I liked it so much I decided to complete my grand tour of western Europe by cycling around England, Scotland, and Wales the following summer, and that I did. I spent about 70 days cycling around the UK in the summer of 1984, a drout summer with only five days of light rain. Ever since 1984 I have been taking off on long bicycling tours when free to do so.


862
Urban Cycling / Urban Touring
« on: September 26, 2008, 01:37:38 pm »
Try coming in off of two weeks of interstate cycling across a state like Texas, and then descend suddenly into urban cycling. It requires a transition in skills, attitude, and adaptability. What a change it is. Long distance interstate cycling is easygoing, almost lightless, and you really get in some mileage.
Cities have all kinds of traffic, lights, intersections, rush hours, cramped cycling quarters, drunks, sidewalks. City cycling is a different sort of cycling, and the awareness of that difference can be greatly accentuated by contrasting it to open road cycling.


863
Urban Cycling / top bicycle-friendly cities and towns
« on: October 11, 2008, 03:15:34 pm »
I do not know of any particularly bike friendly cities, and the town where I am from in Florida is not what I would call bike friendly. The bike paths that were here for years were pot-holed and terrible. Half a mile would have about fifty major slams to your wheels. There are bike lanes, but that is because new roads had government funding, and government mandated lanes for cycling, and even those are right out in traffic. My town is right on the Atlantic coast bicycle route. It is not recommended that anyone cycle south of here to West Palm Beach on Highway US One. A much better route is A1A starting on Jupiter Island and going south.

No, I cannot call this place bike friendly, but some drivers do watch out for people on bikes, and some are quite courteous in ways that you would never ever see in other parts of the world, such as in China for example.


864
Classifieds / WANTED  Equipped tour bike to borrow, rent or buy
« on: October 30, 2008, 02:13:36 pm »
There should be plenty of used bikes for sale in the Fort Lauderdale area.


865
Gear Talk / new crankset
« on: December 26, 2008, 11:06:10 am »
I have never attended much to such matters as gear numbers and such, though I suppose I should have more carefully. I might generally go with 48-38-28 on the front, and a standard (if there is such a thing) five-ring cluster on the rear. Hitting mostly level or relatively level ground on coastal Florida is one matter. The S-tier is another matter. And the PCBR is quite another  matter again. Gear numbers are something to consider for sure. It is just that I have always just geared up and gone. I remember using a  seven ring rear cluster on the northern tier with a large inside gear because of long steep grades. Usually, on highway ninety, I used only two or three gears on the rear, and 38 and 28 on the front.


866
Gear Talk / Rear bike rack
« on: December 26, 2008, 11:19:08 am »
I don't know. I just buy whatever rack is cheap and available, use it to near failure, and get another. Actually, if it is cheap, I just get a new one before another long tour as a sort of preventive maintenance. No problems doing it that way, but I have to keep buying cheap racks and changing them. It is not a concern. There are some very good racks out there that cost more than I have ever spent for one.


867
Gear Talk / STI vs. Bar ends
« on: November 17, 2008, 04:41:05 pm »
Bar end shifters are great. I have never used them, but I have read accounts of those who have, and in the opinions of all those I have read about, they are just about the only way to go.




868
Gear Talk / Spongy Wonder cycle seat
« on: November 17, 2008, 04:57:57 pm »
The worst things that can happen are that it will not be comfortable, you will have to stop at a bike shop or department store, buy another saddle, and ship that old saddle home.


869
Gear Talk / Raleigh Sojourn
« on: December 26, 2008, 11:13:43 am »
I have never heard of a 32 spoke wheel for a touring bike. I am no expert on wheels, but unless there is some new kind of extra strong 32 spoke wheel out there, it is not recommended for heavy touring. 36 is as low as you want to go for touring, and 40 is good too. Get what you can, but if you cannot afford all that much, do your spending on the rear wheel. Not all bicycle wheels are equal by a long shot. A cheap $35.00 steel wheel on the front should take you across the continent without trouble. The rear wheel is a very different matter, especially on tough hilly / mountainous routes.


870
Gear Talk / Raleigh Sojourn
« on: October 30, 2008, 01:49:19 pm »
I looked at the picture. That is a good bike for long distance touring. I could not see close enought to determine if there were eyes for fastening a rack in the front. A good touring bike should have such eyes fore and aft. Other than that, it is an excellent bike for touring.


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