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Messages - Paul V

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31
August 13, 2009

I have rewritten sections of the procedure to try to make it easier to read.  I have added detail about the meeting process.

Following is a draft procedure for establishing a United States Bicycle Route (USBR) within a corridor as proposed by AASHTO. 

For more information on the USBR program, please see:

http://www.adventurecycling.org/routes/nbrn/usbikewaysystem.cfm

This procedure was written with USBR 35 in mind.  It was written in a way that it could be used by other corridors as well.

Your comments are requested. 


United States Bicycle Route Establishment Procedure

1. Definitions

a. AASHTO - American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials

b. Approved Route - A Route approved by AASHTO as a USBR.

c. Corridor - An area proposed by AASHTO for a potential USBR route.

d. Corridor Committee - A committee of Destination municipalities formed by invitation to consider establishing a USBR.

e. Destination - A municipality through which the Route must pass.

f. Destination Criteria - Destinations are municipalities in the USBR corridor which have as a minimum: lodging, restaurants and grocery stores.  Historic cities and villages have priority in selection of Destinations.  Destinations shall be selected so as to form a route which is roughly parallel to the corridor.

g. DOT - A state department of transportation.

h. Draft Route Amendment - A change to the turn by turn description of the Route.

i. Metropolitan Planning Commission - a regional governmental planning organization which coordinates transportation planning over a number of municipalities and road commissions.

j. Notice of Intent - A letter stating that the Corridor Committee has been formed and that it intends to establish a USBR.

k. Route - A turn by turn description of a bicycle path which connects Destinations, from the starting point to ending point of the state corridor.

l. Municipality - A city, village or township.

m. Road Organizations - An entity which has the authority to design, construct and maintain roadway or trailway, typically a city, road commission or DOT.

n. Proposed Route - A Route which has received assent by all Road Organizations, either by approval or by nonaction.

o. Route Application - An application for a USBR prepared on a form provided by AASHTO.

p. Route Criteria - Route Criteria as outlined in the May 11, 2009 memo from the Task Force on US Bicycle Routes:
Specific Route Criteria: Considerations when Choosing Roads and Trails
Primary Considerations – Specific Routes should meet as many of the following as practicable:
(i) When applicable, meet the planning, design, and operational criteria in the AASHTO Guide for Development of Bicycle Facilities.
(ii) Offer services and amenities such as restaurants, accommodations, camping, bicycle shops, and convenience/grocery stores at appropriate intervals.
(iii) Go into the centers of metropolitan areas, using low-traffic and/or off-road bikeways when possible. Bypass routes could be considered to accommodate users who don't wish to enter the city or who are seeking a less urban experience.
(iv) Include spurs to target destinations (universities or other educational institutions, recreational areas, or other attractions) and to multimodal nodes such as airports and rail, bus, and transit stations.
(v) Follow natural corridors and provide terrain suitable for cycling, avoiding extremely hilly and limited visibility winding roads when feasible.
(vi) Consider appropriate combinations of low daily traffic, low truck traffic, wide paved shoulders, lane striping, adequate sight distance, and traffic speed in order to be bicycle friendly.
(vii) In urban areas, be suitable for utility cycling (commuting, access to shopping, schools and universities, recreation centers, etc.). Consideration should be given to bicycle routes that can be used as evacuation routes for emergency situations.
(viii) Include major existing and planned bike routes, including both on-road facilities and off-road shared use paths and trails that are suitable for road bikes.
Secondary Consideration
(ix) May include short stretches of high quality unpaved roads if needed to connect highly desirable paved road sections. (These roads should maintain the standard of road bike suitability).

q. Route Hearing - A publicized posting of a route on an internet site with notification to other entities.  A Route Hearing may include public meetings.

r. State Bicycle/Trail Organization - A statewide recognized non profit organization whose purpose is to promote bicycling and/or bicycle trails.  (In Michigan, this would include both the League of Michigan Bicyclists and the Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance).

s. USBR - United States Bicycle Route as promulgated by AASHTO.

2. Route Approval Procedure

a. Forming a Corridor Committee

(i) The governing body of a municipality located in a Corridor may invite other municipalities to form a Corridor Committee.  A Corridor Committee may be formed for a state or may be formed with members from more than one state.

(ii) A Letter of Invitation shall provide background information on the United States Bicycle Route Corridor and request that the municipality approve a resolution joining the Corridor Committee and appointing a representative to the Committee.

(iii) A Corridor Committee shall be formed by the adoption of resolutions joining the committee of not less than 7 and not more than 11 municipalities. 

(iv) A Corridor Committee may meet and vote in person, by conference call, by internet forum or other means of communication.  The Corridor Committee shall adopt by-laws which include election of a chairperson, vice-chairperson and secretary.  A record of meetings shall be made as minutes, which shall be publicly available.

b. Notice of Intent

A Corridor Committee shall send a Notice of Intent to AASHTO, the State DOT, Metropolitan Planning Commissions in the Corridor area and to State Bicycle/Trail Organizations. In areas where a corridor crosses a state boundary, a Corridor Committee shall send a Notice of Intent to the DOT of adjacent states or provinces, and to the Road Organization and Metropolitan Planning Organization of the areas in the adjacent state impacted by the corridor.  A Corridor Committee may send a Notice of Intent to other stakeholding groups, such as local bicycle groups.

c. Selection of Destinations

A Corridor Committee shall propose Destinations along the Corridor, through which a Route shall be established.  A Corridor Committee shall consider Destination Criteria.  A Corridor Committee may create a mission statement for the Route to assist in the selection of Destinations.  A Corridor Committee shall by majority vote establish Destinations for the Corridor. 

d. Notifying Interested Organizations

(i) The following organizations shall be notified that a draft route is being prepared, and request that a volunteer from the organization attend a Route Planning Meeting:

   (1)   Road Organizations
   (2)   Destination Municipalities
   (3)   Metropolitan Planning Commissions
   (4)   Adjacent State/Province Metropolitan Planning Commissions
   (5)   State Bicycle Trail Organizations
   (6)   Other Stakeholder Groups

(ii)      The Corridor Committee shall transmit Route Criteria to the organizations.

(iii)   The Corridor Committee may work with any of the organizations or volunteers to prepare a preliminary draft route prior to the Route Planning Meeting.

(iv)   A Corridor Committee shall provide a list of contacts which it has made to all contacted groups and organizations to encourage cooperation in preparing a Draft Route.

e. Route Planning Meetings

The Corridor Committee shall divide the route into sections and shall schedule a route planning meeting for each section.  The route planning meetings may be organized and hosted by the Corridor Committee municipalities.  The focus of the route planning meeting shall be to develop a turn by turn route in the section.  The route shall be coordinated with adjacent sections and adjacent state or province, if applicable.  There may be as many route planning meetings as necessary to complete the task.  When complete, the section committee shall transmit the turn by turn route to the Corridor Committee.

f. Draft Route Hearing

(i) Upon receipt of turn by turn routes from all sections within the Corridor, the Corridor Committee shall compile the route and shall set a Draft Route Hearing.  Road Organizations, Destination Municipalities, Metropolitan Planning Organizations in the corridor area, the State Bicycle/Trail Organization and other stakeholder groups shall be invited to participate in the Draft Route Hearing.  The Draft Route Hearing shall be held by publishing a Draft Route on an internet site and providing a means to post comments.  The Corridor Committee is encouraged provide notice through press releases, State Bicycle/Trail Organization websites, newsletters, and other means.  The Draft Route Hearing shall be available for review and comment for no less than 21 days. There may be a public meeting held in one or more locations, with no less than ten days notice prior to the meeting to Destinations, Road Organizations, Metropolitan Planning Organizations in the corridor area, the State Bicycle/Trail Organization and stakeholder groups.  Draft Route public meetings, if held, shall be subject to the Open Meetings Act. 

(ii) Upon completion of the Draft Route Hearing, the Corridor Committee shall prepare a map and turn by turn route which meets the requirements of AASHTO for application to the USBR program.  The Corridor Committee shall consider the Draft Route and may approve it by majority vote. 

g. Road Organization Review of Draft Route

(i) Upon approval of a Draft Route, the Corridor Committee shall transmit the Draft Route to all Road Organizations which have authority over roads or trails included in the Route.  Affected Road Organizations will be requested to amend or approve the Draft Route.  If an Amendment is proposed to the Draft Route, the Corridor Committee shall transmit the amendment to the two Destinations which are connected by that portion of the Draft Route, Road Organizations which have jurisdiction of portion of the Draft Route between the aforenamed Destinations, the Metroplitan Planning Organization, DOT and  the State Bicycle/Trail Organization.  The Corridor Committee may transmit the proposed amendment to stakeholder groups.

(ii) A Road Organization shall respond within 90 days of transmittal of a Draft Route by either  approval of the Draft Route, or by submitting a Draft Route Amendment.  A Draft Route Amendment shall show a change in the Draft Route in a similar form as a Draft Route is presented.  If a Road Organization does not respond within 90 days of transmittal of the Draft Route with either a Resolution of Approval or a Draft Route Amendment, then the Draft Route may be certified as an Approved Route by the Corridor Committee without Road Organization approval.  A Road Organization may request in writing an extension of an additional 90 days for review of the Route.

h. Road Organization Draft Route Amendment

(i) If a Road Organization proposes a Draft Route Amendment, a Draft Route Amendement Hearing shall be held by the Corridor Committee by publishing the amended routes on an internet site and providing a means to post comments.  The Draft Route Amendment Hearing shall be available for review and comment for no less than 21 days. There may be a public meeting held in one or more locations.  Notice shall be provided, no less than 10 days prior to the hearing, to Destinations, Road Organizations, the Metropolitan Planning Organizations within the corridor, the State Bicycle/Trail Organization and stakeholder groups prior to the meeting. 

(ii) Upon completion of the Draft Route Amendment Hearing, the Corridor Committee shall request that the Road Organization resubmit the Draft Route Amendment to the Corridor Committee, with or without any changes which the Road Organization desires to make.  The Corridor Committee shall accept the decision of the Road Organization on the Draft Route.  If there is a disagreement between two Road Authorities regarding a connection point on the boundary between jurisdictions, the Corridor Committee shall attempt to mediate and facilitate an agreement on the route.  If there is no agreement after six months of mediation, the Corridor Committee shall then select a route which best meets the requirements of the Route Criteria.

i. DOT Review

Upon completion of all Draft Route Amendment Hearings, the Corridor Committee shall publish the Proposed Route on an internet site.  The Corridor Committee shall complete an application to AASHTO for establishment of the Route in the USBR system.  The Corridor Committee shall transmit the completed application to DOT for DOT review. 

j. Application Submittal to AASHTO

The DOT shall review the Proposed Route.  Upon DOT acceptance of the Route Application, DOT shall sumbit the application to AASHTO.  If any changes are desired, whether to the application or to the Route, the DOT shall transmit those desired changes to the Corridor Committee.  The Corridor Committee shall consider those changes and may amend the application, except that any change to a portion of the Route must also be approved by the Road Organization with authority over that portion of the Route, following the procedure outlined in the Road Organization Amendment of Draft Route. 

k. Disbandment of the Corridor Committee

Upon AASHTO approval of the Route, the Corridor Committee shall disband.

l. Amendment of Route after AASHTO Approval

Any person or organization which desires to amend an Existing Route approved by AASHTO shall request that the Road Organization with jurisdiction over that portion of the Route  publish and  consider the amendment using the Draft Route Amendment procedure, except that the Road Organization with jurisdiction shall take on the responsibilities of the Corridor Committee for the amendment process.

m. Amendment of Destinations

Any person or organization which desires to change Destinations on the Route shall request that the Corridor Committee reform with representatives from the original member Municipalities to consider removal or addition of a Destination to the Route.


32
CITY OF       
          COUNTY, MICHIGAN

RESOLUTION NO.          
   
A RESOLUTION SUPPORTING ESTABLISHMENT OF AND
JOINING THE MICHIGAN CORRIDOR COMMITTEE
FOR UNITED STATED BICYCLE ROUTE 35

Minutes of a regular meeting of the City Council of the City of    ,           County, Michigan, held in the City Hall,           Street,          , Michigan           on       , 2009 at 7:30 p.m. local time.

PRESENT:                               

ABSENT:                               

The following preamble and resolution was offered by Member         and supported by Member          .

WHEREAS, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) encourages development of a coordinated system of numbered interstate bicycle routes similar in concept to the interstate highway system; and,

WHEREAS, AASHTO has established the United Stated Bicycle Route (USBR) numbering and marking system to facilitate bicycle touring between the states and has identified a system of corridors within which routes may be designated; and,

WHEREAS, AASHTO has established USBR Corridor 35, stretching from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan to Natchez, Mississippi; and,

WHEREAS, in Michigan, USBR Corridor 35 runs from the State of Indiana along the coast of Lake Michigan to the Mackinac Bridge, and extends to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan to the border crossing to the Province of Ontario, Canada; and,

WHEREAS, it is desired to designate the route of USBR 35 within the Michigan corridor and to connect the route to the Province of Ontario and the State of Indiana; and,

WHEREAS, a nationally recognized bicycle touring route will enhance tourism and economic development along the route; and,

WHEREAS, a bicycle touring route will improve recreational opportunities, encourage bicycling,  exercise and healthy lifestyles for people living along the route and visitors to the area; and,

WHEREAS, a bicycle touring route will promote recreation and travel in a way that is healthy for the environment and is sustainable for the future; and,

WHEREAS, a number of cities along the USBR Corridor 35 desire to establish a committee to designate the bicycle touring route.



THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the City of        supports and commits to being a member of the United States Business Route 35 Michigan Corridor Committee; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the City of        appoints         as the City's representative to the USBR Michigan Corridor Committee.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this resolution shall take effect upon passage by the City Council.

RECORD OF VOTE:

   Yeas:                                  

   Nays:                                  

RESOLUTION DECLARED ADOPTED.

                                       
                                 , Mayor


                                       
                                 , City Clerk

33
Letter of Invitation to Join a Corridor Committee


<date>

<firstname> <lastname>
<title>
<organization>
<address>
<city>, <state> <zip>

RE:   Invitation to join in establishing a US Bicycle Route

Dear Mayor <lastname>;

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials has proposed a nationwide program to establish numbered bicycle touring routes throughout the United States, comparable to the US Interstate Highway numbering system.  We are very excited about establishing this bicycle touring route, which has the potential to boost our local tourism industry.

Across the United States, corridors have been established, and now there is a need to determine the bicycle routes within those corridors.  In Michigan, US Bicycle Route 35 is proposed to run from Indiana along the Lake Michigan shore to the Mackinac Bridge, and then to Sault Ste. Marie, connecting with bicycle routes in Ontario, as well as connecting to  other bicycle routes within Michigan.   The task at hand is to determine through which cities the route will pass, and which roads will be included in the turn by turn route map.

Your city is invited to join in a Corridor Committee for USBR 35.  The Corridor Committee will set a number of destination cities through which the route will pass, and then at the local level will begin work on a turn by turn route map.  As a committee member, your city's role would be to organize and hold local meetings and to notify stakeholders of the process.  Stakeholders include road commissions, MDOT, metropolitan planning commissions, state bicycle trail groups, local bicycle clubs and local bicycle enthusiasts.  We expect that most of the route will be identified by local bicycle clubs and enthusiasts, who know which roads are most suitable for bicyclists.  The process includes local MDOT officials, county road commissions and city street departments, who have final approval over which streets are selected.

As a Corridor Committee member, your city would be expected to appoint a representative to the Committee.  That person should be able to set up and hold meetings with stakeholders in your city.  There may be a need to coordinate with the next Corridor Committee city to  the north and south of your city.  The Corridor Committee will need to meet with all of its members a number of times, however, we hope to be able to hold most or all of the Corridor Committee meetings on the internet or by conference call.  It is very important that we have participation from cities along the entire route from New Buffalo to Sault Ste. Marie.  This will allow for public input from local people and groups along the entire route. 

In order to become part of the committee to establish US Bicycle Route 35, please respond by appointing a person to serve as committee member from your city.  If you wish, you may use the attached resolution to show support for establishment of USBR 35.

If you feel that a nationally recognized bicycle route through your city would benefit your local economy, I encourage you to participate in the Corridor Committee. 

Sincerely;


Mayor InvitingCity
InvitingCity, Michigan

34
Here is an easier to read step by step process description without all the detail:

USBR Process Step by Step

1. A municipality invites other municipalities to form a corridor committee.
2. Municipalities join together to create a corridor committee.
3. A letter of intent to establish a route is sent to the DOT and other groups.
4. The corridor committee identifies and approves a list of destinations, through which the route must pass.
5. The corridor committee notifies stakeholders of the intent to establish a route and invites them to participate.

Stakeholders include: government entities who maintain and construct roads along the route, destination municipalities, metropolitan or regional planning organizations, state bicycle and trail organizations, local bicycle organizations and any other interested stakeholders which can be identified.

6. The corridor committee and other interested parties put together a draft route in a series of workshops. (Note: section 5.e.1 could be improved)
7. The corridor committee sets a public meeting date for review of the proposed route and invites stakeholders and the public to attend.
8. After consideration of public comment, the corridor committee approves a draft route.
9. The corridor committee sends the draft route to road organizations (entities who maintain and construct the roads included in the draft plan).
10. Road organizations may approve the draft route or may recommend amendment of the route to the corridor committee.
11. The corridor committee holds a public hearing on the amendment and sends a recommendation on the draft route amendment to the road organization.
12. The road organization then considers the comments and recommendations, and if it so desires, makes appropriate changes to the draft route and approves that portion of the route on roads controlled by that road organization. 
13. The corridor committee accepts the draft route as approved by the road organizations.
14. Upon completion of this process for all parts of the route in a state, the corridor committee publishes the proposed route and transmits the proposed route to the state department of transportation.
15. The DOT reviews the proposed route, and if it approves, shall make application to AASHTO for establishment of the route.
16. If the DOT desires changes to the proposed route, it shall identify the desired amendments and send those amendments to the corridor committee.
17. The corridor committee will consider the DOT amendments and shall transmit the DOT amendments to the road organization which controls the affected portion of the roadway.
18. The corridor committee and road organization shall forward their recommendations to the DOT.
19. The DOT will consider the recommendations and then amend the route as the DOT so determines. (section needs clarification)
20. The DOT shall make application to AASHTO for establishment of the route.
21. Upon AASHTO approval of the route, the corridor committee shall disband.
22. After the route is approved, changes to the route may be considered following the same process, except that the road organization with control of the section of the roadway will take on the responsibilities of the corridor committee.
23. To change the destination cities within the corridor, the corridor commitee shall be re-formed to consider the change.



35
I would expect that local bicycle clubs/associations, bicycle trail groups and bicycle enthusiasts would do the lion's share of the work of putting together an initial route map.  Another group that will be heavily involved on USBR 35 in MI are the metropolitan area planning commissions. I don't expect the group of destination cities to do the turn by turn route planning on their own. The cities' role will be to provide meeting rooms, schedule meetings in each area and try to keep the process on track.  By working as a group of cities along a  route which passes through a number of regions, the process can be coordinated over a large area so that over a period of time (a year?) each region can come up with their portion of the route, and a complete route can be established.  Having local governments involved may give the impression of a process which is more open to the public than a process that is run by citizens groups. 

Perhaps a citizen's group (bicycle organization) could initiate the process of establishing a route.  As I wrote the process, it is a City which can start the process.  The reason I wrote it that way is that I intend to try to get the City of South Haven (my employer) to start the USBR 35 process.  But there could be other ways to start the process.

I think it is important to give the destination cities, or at least a group of destination cities the opportunity to define the points that the route will pass through.  I would fear that routes would tend to just go the shortest, easiest path and may bypass cities if there is no way for destination cities to make the route connect city centers.  It also makes sense from a bicycle touring point of view, because the services available in cities (restaurant, lodging, stores) are needed on a regular basis.

I am writing this from the point of view of being in a region where there are small cities separated by rural areas.  This may be different in larger urban and suburban areas.

36
heheh well, yes, I was born in Germany and work as a City employee (bureaucrat).

This was written specifically for Michigan.  It was written from the perspective of a City which desires to get the process started for tourism economic development reasons.  I wrote this as an attempt to be very precise regarding the roles and authority of the various groups ahead of time. 

As proposed, the road agencies which have the responsibility for design and construction of roadway have final authority over which roads are selected.  In Michigan those agencies are MDOT for state highways, County Road Commissions for roads in rural areas, and Cities for roads within cities. 

However, note that the road agencies do not have the authority to designate the destinations which the route must connect.  This is an important point because it allows the Cities which are members of the committee to designate the destinations which the route must connect.  This should help ensure that the route is suitable for bicyclists who need services such as lodging, restaurants and grocery stores on a regular basis.

The reason that the process was spelled out in detail is that the state department of transporation must apply for the route to AASHTO.  I know that our state MDOT does not have the resources to oversee this work.  This process is an attempt to assure MDOT that we have followed a public process and input from the public has been taken into consideration.  If I were in MDOT's shoes, I would be very cautious of sending in an application if I thought there might be some dispute and controversy about the route. 

 
 


37
Following is a draft procedure for establishing a United States Bicycle Route (USBR) within a corridor as proposed by AASHTO. 

For more information on the USBR program, please see:

http://www.adventurecycling.org/routes/nbrn/usbikewaysystem.cfm

This procedure was written with USBR 35 in mind.  It was written in a way that it could be used by other corridors as well.

Your comments are requested. 


United States Bicycle Route Establishment Procedure

1. Definitions

a. AASHTO - American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials

b. Approved Route - A Route approved by AASHTO as a USBR.

c. Corridor - An area proposed by AASHTO for a potential USBR route.

d. Corridor Committee - A committee of Destination municipalities formed by invitation to consider establishing a USBR.

e. Destination - A municipality through which the Route must pass.

f. Destination Criteria - Destinations are municipalities in the USBR corridor which have as a minimum: lodging, restaurants and grocery stores.  Historic cities and villages have priority in selection of Destinations.  Destinations shall be selected so as to form a route which is roughly parallel to the corridor.

g. DOT - A state department of transportation.

h. Draft Route Amendment - A change to the turn by turn description of the Route.

i. Metropolitan Planning Commission - a regional governmental planning organization which coordinates transportation planning over a number of municipalities and road commissions.

j. Notice of Intent - A letter stating that the Corridor Committee has been formed and that it intends to establish a USBR.

k. Route - A turn by turn description of a bicycle path which connects Destinations, from the starting point to ending point of the state corridor.

l. Municipality - A city, village or township.

m. Road Organizations - An entity which has the authority to design, construct and maintain roadway or trailway, typically a city, road commission or DOT.

n. Proposed Route - A Route which has received assent by all Road Organizations, either by approval or by nonaction.

o. Route Application - An application for a USBR prepared on a form provided by AASHTO.

p. Route Criteria - Route Criteria as outlined in the May 11, 2009 memo from the Task Force on US Bicycle Routes:
Specific Route Criteria: Considerations when Choosing Roads and Trails
Primary Considerations – Specific Routes should meet as many of the following as practicable:
1. When applicable, meet the planning, design, and operational criteria in the AASHTO Guide for Development of Bicycle Facilities.
2. Offer services and amenities such as restaurants, accommodations, camping, bicycle shops, and convenience/grocery stores at appropriate intervals.
3. Go into the centers of metropolitan areas, using low-traffic and/or off-road bikeways when possible. Bypass routes could be considered to accommodate users who don't wish to enter the city or who are seeking a less urban experience.
4. Include spurs to target destinations (universities or other educational institutions, recreational areas, or other attractions) and to multimodal nodes such as airports and rail, bus, and transit stations.
5. Follow natural corridors and provide terrain suitable for cycling, avoiding extremely hilly and limited visibility winding roads when feasible.
6. Consider appropriate combinations of low daily traffic, low truck traffic, wide paved shoulders, lane striping, adequate sight distance, and traffic speed in order to be bicycle friendly.
7. In urban areas, be suitable for utility cycling (commuting, access to shopping, schools and universities, recreation centers, etc.). Consideration should be given to bicycle routes that can be used as evacuation routes for emergency situations.
8. Include major existing and planned bike routes, including both on-road facilities and off-road shared use paths and trails that are suitable for road bikes.
Secondary Consideration
9. May include short stretches of high quality unpaved roads if needed to connect highly desirable paved road sections. (These roads should maintain the standard of road bike suitability).

q. Route Hearing - A publicized posting of a route on an internet site with notification to other entities.  A Route Hearing may include public meetings.

r. State Bicycle/Trail Organization - A statewide recognized non profit organization whose purpose is to promote bicycling and/or bicycle trails.  (In Michigan, this would include both the League of Michigan Bicyclists and the Michigan Trails and Greenways Alliance).

s. USBR - United States Bicycle Route as promulgated by AASHTO.

2. Procedure

a. Forming a Corridor Committee

1. The governing body of a municipality located in a Corridor may invite other municipalities to form a Corridor Committee.  A Corridor Committee may be formed for a state or may be formed with members from more than one state.

2. A Letter of Invitation shall provide background information on the United States Bicycle Route Corridor and request that the municipality approve a resolution joining the Corridor Committee and appointing a representative to the Committee.

3. A Corridor Committee shall be formed by the adoption of resolutions joining the committee of not less than 7 and not more than 11 municipalities. 

4. A Corridor Committee may meet and vote in person, by conference call, by internet forum or other means of communication.  The Corridor Committee shall adopt by-laws which include election of a chairperson, vice-chairperson and secretary.  A record of meetings shall be made as minutes, which shall be publicly available.

b. Notice of Intent

1. A Corridor Committee shall send a Notice of Intent to AASHTO, the State DOT, Metropolitan Planning Commissions in the Corridor area and the State Bicycle/Trail Organizations. In areas where a corridor crosses a state boundary, a Corridor Committee shall send a Notice of Intent to the DOT of adjacent states or provinces, and to the Road Organization and Metropolitan Planning Organization of the areas impacted by the corridor.  A Corridor Committee may send a Notice of Intent to other stakeholding groups, such as local bicycle groups.

c. Selection of Destinations

1. A Corridor Committee shall propose Destinations along the Corridor, through which a Route shall be established.  A Corridor Committee shall consider Destination Criteria.  A Corridor Committee may create a mission statement for the Route to assist in the selection of Destinations.  A Corridor Committee shall by majority vote establish Destinations for the Corridor. 

d. Notifying Interested Organizations

1. A Corridor Committee shall identify affected Road Organizations which are responsible for design, construction and maintenance of streets and roads in the areas through which a route may connect Destinations.  A Corridor Committee shall request recommendations for bicycle routes which connect Destinations in the area of the Road Organization's responsibility.  In areas where a corridor crosses a state boundary, a Corridor Committee shall contact the Road Organizations of adjacent states or provinces and request a recommendation for a connection point at the state border. A Corridor Committee shall transmit Route Criteria to the Road Organization.

2. A Corridor Committee shall notify Municipalities which are selected as Destinations and request recommendations for bicycle route between that Municipality and adjacent Destinations, including a route within the Municipality.  A Corridor Committee shall transmit Route Criteria to the Destinations.

3. A Corridor Committee shall contact Metropolitan Planning Commissions in the Corridor area and request recommendations for routes connecting Destinations.  In areas where a corridor crosses a state boundary, a Corridor Committee shall contact the Metropolitan Planning Organization of adjacent states or provinces and request a recommendation for a connection point at the state border.  A Corridor Committee shall transmit Route Criteria to the  Metropolitan Planning Commissions in the Corridor area.

4. A Corridor Committee shall contact State Bicycle/Trail Organizations and request recommendations for routes connecting Destinations.  In areas where a corridor crosses a state boundary, a Corridor Committee shall contact the State Bicycle/Trail Organizations of adjacent states or provinces and request a recommendation for a connection point at the state border.  A Corridor Committee may contact other interested stakeholder groups and request recommendations for routes connecting Destinations.    A Corridor Committee shall transmit Route Criteria to the State Bicycle/Trail Organizations and other stakeholder groups.

5. A Corridor Committee shall provide a list of contacts which it has made to all contacted groups and organizations to encourage cooperation in preparing a Draft Route.

e. Draft Route Process

1. Based on responses from interested organizations, the Corridor Committee shall prepare a Preliminary Draft Route.

2. A Corridor Committee shall set a Draft Route Hearing.  Road Organizations, Destination Municipalities, Metropolitan Planning Organizations in the corridor area, the State Bicycle/Trail Organization and other stakeholder groups shall be invited to participate in the Draft Route Hearing.  The Draft Route Hearing shall be held by publishing a Draft Route on an internet site and providing a means to post comments.  The Corridor Committee is encouraged provide notice through press releases, State Bicycle/Trail Organization websites, newsletters, and other means.  The Draft Route Hearing shall be available for review and comment for no less than 21 days. There may be a public meeting held in one or more locations, with no less than ten days notice prior to the meeting to Destinations, Road Organizations, Metropolitan Planning Organizations in the corridor area, the State Bicycle/Trail Organization and stakeholder groups.  Draft Route public meetings, if held, shall be subject to the Open Meetings Act. 

3. Upon completion of the Draft Route Hearing, the Corridor Committee shall prepare a map and turn by turn route which meets the requirements of AASHTO for application to the USBR program.  The Corridor Committee shall consider the Draft Route and may approve it by majority vote. 

f. Road Organization Review of Draft Route

1. Upon approval of a Draft Route, the Corridor Committee shall transmit the Draft Route to all Road Organizations which have authority over roads or trails included in the Route.  Affected Road Organizations will be requested to amend or approve the Draft Route.  If an Amendment is proposed to the Draft Route, the amendment shall be transmitted to the two Destinations which are connected by that portion of the Draft Route, Road Organizations which have jurisdiction of portion of the Draft Route between the aforenamed Destinations, the Metroplitan Planning Organization, DOT and  the State Bicycle/Trail Organization.  The Corridor Committee may transmit the proposed amendment to stakeholder groups.

2. A Road Organization shall respond within 90 days of transmittal of a Draft Route by either a resolution of approval of the Draft Route, or by submitting a Draft Route Amendment.  A Draft Route Amendment shall show a change in the Draft Route in a similar form as a Draft Route is presented.  If a Road Organization does not respond within 90 days of transmittal of the Draft Route with either a Resolution of Approval or a Draft Route Amendment, then the Draft Route shall be certified as an Approved Route by the Corridor Committee.  A Road Organization may request in writing an extension of an additional 90 days for review of the Route.

g. Road Organization Draft Route Amendment

1. If a Road Organization proposes a Draft Route Amendment, a Draft Route Amendement Hearing shall be held by the Corridor Committee by publishing the amended routes on an internet site and providing a means to post comments.  The Draft Route Amendment Hearing shall be available for review and comment for no less than 21 days. There may be a public meeting held in one or more locations, with no less than ten days notice to Destinations, Road Organizations, the Metropolitan Planning Organizations within the corridor, the State Bicycle/Trail Organization and stakeholder groups prior to the meeting. 

2. Upon completion of the Draft Route Amendment Hearing, the Corridor Committee shall request that the Road Organization resubmit the Draft Route Amendment to the Corridor Committee, with or without any changes which the Road Organization desires to make.  The Corridor Committee shall accept the decision of the Road Organization on the Draft Route.  If there is a disagreement between two Road Authorities regarding a connection point on the boundary between jurisdictions, the Corridor Committee shall attempt to mediate and facilitate an agreement on the route.  If there is no agreement after six months of mediation, the Corridor Committee shall then select a route which best meets the requirements of the Route Criteria.

h. DOT Review

1. Upon completion of all Draft Route Amendment Hearings, the Corridor Committee shall publish the Proposed Route on an internet site.  The Corridor Committee shall complete an application to AASHTO for establishment of the Route in the USBR system.  The Corridor Committee shall transmit the completed application to DOT for DOT review. 

i. Application Submittal to AASHTO

1. The DOT shall review the Proposed Route.  Upon DOT acceptance of the Route Application, DOT shall sumbit the application to AASHTO.  If any changes are desired, whether to the application or to the Route, the DOT shall transmit those desired changes to the Corridor Committee.  The Corridor Committee shall consider those changes and may amend the application, except that any change to a portion of the Route must also be approved by the Road Organization with authority over that portion of the Route, following the procedure outlined in the Road Organization Amendment of Draft Route. 

j. Disbandment of the Corridor Committee

1. Upon AASHTO approval of the Route, the Corridor Committee shall disband.

k. Amendment of Route after AASHTO Approval

1. Any person or organization which desires to amend an Existing Route approved by AASHTO shall request that the Road Organization with jurisdiction over that portion of the Route  publish and  consider the amendment using the Draft Route Amendment procedure, except that the Road Organization with jurisdiction shall take on the responsibilities of the Corridor Committee for the amendment process.

l. Amendment of Destinations

1. Any person or organization which desires to change Destinations on the Route shall request that the Corridor Committee reform with representatives from the original member Municipalities to consider removal or addition of a Destination to the Route.


38
There does not appear to be a corridor along the south coast of Lake Michigan, between USBR 66 and 35. 

This is an important route for anyone coming from NW of Chicago and headed east.  Also, anyone trying to do a circle of Lake Michigan will need to follow this route.

There is also no direct route from Chicago to Detroit.  Could this be added as a new corridor to provide a path around the South Shore of Lake Michigan and on to Detroit?  The corridor could roughly parallel US 12.

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