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Messages - bogiesan

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481
Classifieds / 2009 Ride Idaho jersey features recumbent!
« on: April 18, 2009, 10:01:48 am »
Conventional jersey—not 'bent-specific—and conventionally priced at $65 plus shipping. But, because there's a recumbent rider on the committee, there's a 'bent in the design on the back panel. You don't have to be on our ride to buy our jersey.

If you missed out on Cycle Oregon or the other Northwest supported tours that instantly sold out, you should be on our ride! Limited to 240 riders, good food, entertainment, rivers, mountains, and a layover day in the lovely resort town McCall, Idaho, located on the shores of glacially formed Payette Lake.

rideidaho.org

david boise ID

482
General Discussion / Re: Carrying Pepper Spray
« on: April 14, 2009, 05:52:14 am »
>Colt 1911 .45 ACP

Since we have approached and then crossed the information/power trope of the possibly mythical meanings afforded by various interpretations of our Second Amendment, it should be safe to assume this post has, at last, propelled the thread to meme status and it is no longer a Foucaultian discourse. With that presumed level of absurdity, I continue:

Colt does not list the mass of their products on their Website so I'll guess a WWI replica 45 is about 6 pounds?
Is there an ultralight version of that? Goretex? Carbon?

Here in Iderho, our good folks carry guns for lots of different reasons. If it's not to protect the women and sheep from the jihadists coming out of the Chinese tunnels, it's to protect ourselves from each other's free-range dogs, which are, it must be noted, legitimately protecting us from the reintroduced grizzlies and wolf packs. It's all quite confusing around here because the dog may itself be armed.

david boise ID

483
Gear Talk / Re: How many people tour with non-touring bikes?
« on: April 03, 2009, 05:40:50 am »
I put 5-6,000 miles a year on my recumbent. Touring, commuting, transportation, recreation. It does everything except race and does so in supreme comfort. It's not light, it's comfortable. It's not particularly fast but it's totall adequate to the task of getting from camp to camp while providing a heads-up, relaxed perspective.
There are race-specific 'bents and, in fact, recumbents hold every unassisted land speed record but those bikes do not do anything except make speed runs (seek human powered vehicles on google).

david boise ID

484
General Discussion / Re: Best Camera for touring?
« on: March 27, 2009, 08:20:12 pm »
I am considering a new camera for my upcoming tour. I have used a Cannon A560 (7 mega pixels) which is ok but I'd really like sharper pictures with more detail. I'm really not that into photography so spare me all the lingo - I'd just be interested in suggestions of a really good portable point and shoot (digital of course) that would be an improvement over what I have.

Then you cannot appreciate the information you've received so far. Rather like asking for "a recommendation for a touring bike but spare me the bike lingo."

"Sharper" pictures and "more" detail are wasted if you're going to email little jpegs from the road. You don't need 7mp. You only need about 1.5 but it's impossible to find a good low density camera these days. But it's the glass, not the mp of the sensor, that determines most performance characteristics. You don't want to pay for glass you can't appreciate but if you want glass: Panasonic and Leica.

Buy a camera based on how easily it works in full-auto, not your objective opinion of the image quality, since you don't really know or care how the thing works. Try to find a unit that has few options, few menus, and few modes.
Can you operate the buttons wearing bike gloves? Can you upload or offload the card while traveling at, say, a public library or coffee shop? Will it survive the rain, a drop, or a dip? Can you afford to lose it, have it stolen, or break it without getting all weirded out?
Make sure you purchase at least one spare battery, a good protective case, and a lanyard because you want to have it strapped to your hand or your bike or you will drop it and I've seen horrible wrecks caused by dopes trying to catch a camera.

david boise ID

485
Cycling Events / Ride Idaho August 2009
« on: February 22, 2009, 09:35:52 am »
rideidaho.org

240 riders, fully supported. Sort of a 350-400 mile loop from the Boise metro area with one layover day on spectacular Payette Lake in the resort town of McCall, Idaho.

As of Feb 20, 2009, after only 8 weeks, we have sold about 120 of our 240 slots.

david boise ID

486
Gear Talk / Re: bike security
« on: February 22, 2009, 09:28:13 am »
What you invest in your security system is a simple, direct relationship. It is a ratio with the total cost of security (devices plus the cost of your regime in terms of time and inconvenience) over the total cost of your bike including contents, emotional investment, and hassle of replacing it all wherever you happen to be when you lose it. A $10 lock and two minutes (round that to $50) over $5,000 is 0.01. Not a good ratio, is it? I'd want it closer to 0.10 but you probably need to apply an imaginary factor for your geographic and cultural locations.

Be sure to research motion-sensing alarms by examining the post-purchase responses. My anecdotal knowledge of such devices includes endless complaints of false activations. On a group tour that means you can get ostracized.

I do supported tours on my recumbent. I carry a small cable lock with a combination lock (easy to lose a key on tour) but I worry more about mindless vandalism than I do about theft.

david boise ID

487
Gear Talk / Re: Dealing with Dogs-device
« on: February 22, 2009, 09:13:05 am »
I had a friend who was a letter carrier for the USPS. She was issued an ultrasonic unit by her union but she had much better luck with bacon flavored biscuits.
Google DOG REPELLERS or DOG CHASERS. There only seem to be two devices that are repackcged and rebranded by several outfits. The Dog Dazer II pops up often for under US$25.00.
I sometimes use a small freon "boat horn" available at any sporting goods store that handles boating accessories, about $8.00.
I also have an AirZound refillable air horn but it's too difficult to mount on my recumbent.

http://www.amazon.com/Dog-Dazer-II-repeller-training/dp/B000E7KVQ2
http://www.bodysecurity.com/dogchaser.htm
http://www.deltacycle.com/product.php?g=1

david boise ID

488
Gear Talk / Re: Touring on a Recumbent Trike
« on: February 20, 2009, 06:37:35 am »
bentrideronline.com

Huge trike community. There is a Trike-Only Tour in Idaho each year, search for TOT.

david boise ID

489
General Discussion / Re: camp food and ideas for eating better
« on: February 07, 2009, 07:52:17 am »
visit any used bookstore and look for the series called "Roughing It Easy."
any backpacking recipe book will help change your whole routine.

There are two food issues most self-contained bikers discuss here often: boredom and ease of preparation. It's not difficult to eat well without any cooking. It's not difficult to get your 2k-3k calories and never eat the same thing twice. it jsut takes imagination and some advice from experienced trail and roadside chefs.

david boise ID

490
Gear Talk / Re: New Touring Bike (RTW)
« on: January 30, 2009, 06:55:40 am »
The topic comes up about once a month around here so you can search for dozens of similar threads. The AC site has buying guides in their archives.

RANS Stratus XP or Easy Racers Tour Easy. About $2k each naked, more like $3k when you outfit it with fairning, skin, racks, panniers, trailer, electronics, other fetishes.

david boise ID

491
General Discussion / Re: Long distance cycling and supliments
« on: January 30, 2009, 06:52:31 am »
Any nutritionist might tell you all you really need is a good, balanced diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and cereals, and this is true within limits. But consider pedaling a fully-loaded touring bike three thousand miles over varied terrain, hills, mountains, rolling, etc.

Any nutritionist will tell you "energy" is only available from calories; calories that are packed into carbs, fats, and proteins. Claims that "energy" can be delivered from any other source is marketing BS. There are substances that can stimulate but this is not energy.

Supplements are unnecessary unless you really know what your body is lacking or what you knwo canot be acquired with a reasonable diet. You end up carrying a bunch of expensive pills that can spoil and provide no provable benefits. Your perception may be different and your metabolism may actually require supplementation but you should know that long before you set out on a tour that presents severe conditions you do not know how to handle or that may deny your body what it is accustomed to consuming and processing.

I carry omega3 capsules. That's all. But I know I'm going to be adequately fed by the catering people.

david boise ID

492
Bike Clubs / Century training group, Boise ID
« on: April 19, 2008, 08:36:35 pm »
Buddy of mine started a group several years ago with a unique mission.
Free, no-drop, all-comers rides, twice a week. The goal is encourage
and train everyone from the total newbie to experienced roadie to
achieve a simple goal: to fearlessly finish a century by the end of the
summer.
The program is set up to end about two weeks before the charity
century events season starts up. It also coincides with the start of Ride
Idaho.

www.communitybicyclerides.org

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

493
Urban Cycling / commuting by bike
« on: June 30, 2007, 03:33:13 pm »
Boise ID
Round trip about 12 miles.
Tour Easy with fairing is good everyday except the 5-15 snow or ice
days each year.
The office building has showers but I don't really need them. On the
rare days I work up a sweat on the way in I will duck over the YMCA.

I am also very fortunate to have a closet where I can hand a week's
clothing.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

494
Gear Talk / Moutain bike Lights
« on: December 29, 2008, 11:35:03 am »
> A couple of other website forums I am a member of, I get a "Hi,
welcome newbie" & I give other new users the same politeness. <

Welcome indeed but we see many such posts. You included no context;
mine was a valid response.

As you can see, the discussion of lighting equipment escalates to
emotional around here. As a year-round commuter, I've got lots of
lights including a searing HID, halogens, and some hi-zoot LEDs but I
don't carry any of them on tour.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

495
Gear Talk / Moutain bike Lights
« on: December 06, 2008, 07:32:21 am »
Suspiciously spam-like post.
 
For information on the best in trail lighting, see these reviews and then
shop carefully for the best buys:

http://www.gearreview.com/LEDs08_intro.php

http://www.gearreview.com/2007_led_lights.php

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

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