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Messages - bogiesan

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526
Gear Talk / Pannier input please
« on: April 08, 2008, 10:19:37 pm »
Arkel seems to be floating to the top and they make great tools. But
there are at least twenty other pannier makers that make excellent,
useful, or merely good values in panniers. Arkel is built to last forver.
That means they're heavy. Do you really need that kind of quality/
protection/curability or can you get by with less weight, less durability,
and no waterproofing? Just put a couple of garbage bags inside.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

527
Gear Talk / Pannier input please
« on: March 30, 2008, 07:19:55 pm »
This site is a bit out of date but still worth a look:
 
http://www.mikebentley.com/bike/panniers.htm

Lots of dead links.

If you need superb current tech, Arkel, Ortleid, Vaude, and Topeak
can't be beat. But you might consider old world classics from
Carradice.

Performance, Nashbar, and REI have excellent values on closeouts,
You've got to shop carefully, though.

david boise ID
 

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

528
Gear Talk / Which sleeping bag?
« on: March 22, 2008, 07:15:53 am »
on closeout for $60 and it weighs less than 3 pounds complete with
stuff sack. It even came with a loose ventilated storage sack.  


Sierra Trading Post and Campmor usually have far better values on deep
discounted items than REI Outlet. (I often feel ripped off by REI these days
but that's just me, member for more than 30 years).

david boise ID




go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

529
Gear Talk / Which sleeping bag?
« on: March 20, 2008, 09:25:45 pm »
If weight is a primary concern, invest a few hours hunting through
ultralight backpacking sites. There are only three places you can save
significant weight: tent, sleeping bag, pad. Everything else is either
necessary (but can possibly be reduced in mass) or simply cannot be
reduced any further. You can carry a 1 pound silnylon tarp and a 2
pound bug screen or a six pound tent. You can carry an eight pound
poly bag or a 2 pound down bag and some extra tights.

Here in dry ol' Idaho, down is queen but I try to take a poly bag on
Cycle Oregon tours cuz we know we'll see rain on at least two out of
seven days. If you know how to take care of your gear, down will serve
you well but, if you're a novice, take poly. I carry two down bags, a
one-pounder and a two pounder. If it gets really cold, they nest.

(You might want to take an interesting lightweight item called  "vapor
barrier liner." Hard to find these days but it can add about ten degrees
to any bag or keep you dry in a wet bag.)

Sleeping pads are totally subjective. On a supported tour, I make them
haul my 6 pound, 2-1/2 inch thick Thermarest. If I'm carrying it
myself, I go for the Cascade Design egg-crate minimum pad.

david boise ID


go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

530
Gear Talk / cyclocross bike for long distance touring?
« on: April 14, 2008, 07:33:07 am »
I don't do self-contained touring.
I ride long distances for fun and, when touring, with full (and, in the
case of Cycle Oregon, luxurious) support on my recumbent, a steel
Tour Easy from Easy Racers in CA. I cannot imagine running a double.
Many of the roadies on organized training rides and on tours mention
they'd sure like to have a triple. I ask why they did not rig it when they
spec'ed the bike. The replies:
1. Too heavy (??)
2. Too expensive (!!)
3. Sales staff said I would never need a triple. (¡!)
4. Looks goofy.  (¿¡)

Against such prejudices, there is no way to discuss the desirability of
gearing on the touring road.
Retrofitting a triple can be expensive: $200-500 depending on the
bike and your choice of designer jewelry.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

531
Gear Talk / cyclocross bike for long distance touring?
« on: March 09, 2008, 09:22:37 am »
"Design" is not necessarily a good criteria for a touring bike. There are
many reasons we run touring-specific bikes. Look at the long list of
what makes a good touring bike and decide how many of the factors
your cyclocross possesses and which ones you can comfortably live
without.

I would not have considered my Cannondale XS800 as a touring steed
despite it's precision fit and the deliciously plush SilkRoad hedshock.
The lovely aluminum frame would have been a risky repair in the
middle of nowhere and there really wasn't a good way to hang panniers
or tow a trailer that looked technically feasible. That's why, when I
decided I wanted to tour, I got a steel recumbent.

However, if you're thinking of maybe trying a fully supported tour, ride
the bike you love.

david boise ID

 

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

532
Gear Talk / Speedo
« on: March 06, 2008, 09:31:35 am »
If you hit any of the major mail order bike shops you can see dozens of
'puters in a grid, listed by feature. Take your pick. It's really hard to
buy a bad wired unit. In 25 years, I have never heard anyone
complaining about one unless it was actually busted when they got it.

I have used three Cateye Astrale units since 1985, sold two of em with
the bikes. The last one is still with me, eight years, more than 30,000
miles, only two batteries. The mount had to be replaced. The sun just
ate it up. Free out of a box of parts at my LBS.

The new Astrale is still a good value. The old ones can be found online
for less than $10 but I suggest you buy stuff like 'puters at your local
bike shop.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

533
Gear Talk / Laptop Handlebar Bag?
« on: February 29, 2008, 07:47:18 am »
No one makes one because it's a silly idea. Buy any bag that fits the
machine and then head to Home Depot for some hardware. Easy to
hang it but it could be rigged flat with extension rods from the front
fork eyelets.
 
You do not want that kind of mass up front on the bars. Get any
handlebat bag and fill it with the same mass (including everything else
he'd have in the bag) and put some miles on the bike. It just ain't safe.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

534
Gear Talk / Keens Cycling Sandles
« on: March 29, 2008, 06:20:24 am »
Keen bike sandals are highly regarded by the recumbent bloggers:

http://www.recumbentblog.com/2008/03/27/keen-commuter/


http://www.bentrideronline.com/ (you have to search the review
section, the forums also have a long thread about Keen products)

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

535
Gear Talk / Tent Rock 22
« on: February 14, 2008, 08:10:15 am »
If you search for TENTS you'll find several threads about how to buy
one and they feature recommendations. Five pounds isn't too much for
a large tent if you enjoy having all the room but I think it's closer to 7
pounds with a footprint, fly, and all the stuff TNF includes in the box.
A good single person tent, like my old Sierra Flashlight, (with
everything, what we call realworld weight) is about 4 pounds total, not
much less.

from tnf site: ROCK 22 Weight : [trail] 5 lbs 14 oz (2.68 kg); [total] 6 lbs
11 oz (3.02 kg)

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

This message was edited by bogiesan on 2-14-08 @ 6:10 AM

536
Gear Talk / Women's touring saddle
« on: February 03, 2008, 08:21:34 am »
> Terry has an excellent policy - you can buy any of their saddles
(direct from their web site), ride it and return or exchange it (30 days)
if you don't like it.  

Yes, I'd want to make sure I liked the saddle before taking off on a long
tour.  Curious how far a woman needs to ride on a saddle before she
knows it's right for her anatomy, bike, and riding style. Back when I
rode upright bikes, I changed saddles every 500 miles or so before I
found one that I could ride on a century. Adjusted post height and
saddle position every 20 miles before I founnd a good fit.

(Then got my recumbent with its 4" cushion and full back support!)

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

537
Gear Talk / Recument tandem vs Trike
« on: February 01, 2008, 08:09:16 am »
bentrider online has a dated buyers' guide and an active trike
discussion forum.
http://www.bentrideronline.com/

crazyguyonabike has several tour diaries from various tandem riders.

Have fun on your trip, please come back when you're done and tell us
about it and which bike you bought.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

538
Gear Talk / Touring Saddles?
« on: February 18, 2008, 10:27:16 am »
> I'm looking for options.

It's getting boring, yes, sorry: I run a recumbent. My touring saddle is a
huge four inch thick, anatomically cut, multi-layered foam chair with a
full backrest made of breathable mesh that includes lumbar support.

When I finish 100 miles, I'm as tired as everyone else, but there isn't a
muscle group or tissue area on my body that hurts because of my seat
or my riding position.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

539
Gear Talk / Touring bike for smaller person?
« on: January 27, 2008, 10:52:02 am »
My standard for all such inquiries about touring bikes: Recumbent.
Fitting a diminutive physique is relatively simple because the selection of
of different designs and wheelbase configurations is quite large. There are
many other benefits to touring on a recumbent  - sheer comfort and
delight among my favorites - but the ability to obtain precision fit through
the inherent adjustability of the bikes may trump all the others.

The buyers guide at www.bentrideronline.com is out of date but it's where
many of us started exploring. Not everyone has the chutzpah to ride a
recumbent, not everyone understands that touring can be so much fun
without pain.

david boise ID



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

540
Gear Talk / Bike Selection
« on: February 18, 2008, 10:19:50 am »
> Finally, are there options I should consider?

Lord, yes: recumbent.
Other: used bike. A used Cannondale is still a fabulous bike. I've had
two Cannondales, loved them, especially my road wedgie with the little
shock. They used to make a touring model with their Silk Road
headshok, 5/8" of travel, probably from 2000-2002. Find one.

A quick visit to the C'dale site shows to my amazed disappointment
that they have dropped the Silk Road shock systems from their range
of bikes. Total bummer.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

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