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Messages - bogiesan

Pages: 1 ... 34 35 [36] 37 38 ... 43
526
Gear Talk / Moutain bike Lights
« on: December 29, 2008, 01:35:03 pm »
> A couple of other website forums I am a member of, I get a "Hi,
welcome newbie" & I give other new users the same politeness. <

Welcome indeed but we see many such posts. You included no context;
mine was a valid response.

As you can see, the discussion of lighting equipment escalates to
emotional around here. As a year-round commuter, I've got lots of
lights including a searing HID, halogens, and some hi-zoot LEDs but I
don't carry any of them on tour.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

527
Gear Talk / Moutain bike Lights
« on: December 06, 2008, 09:32:21 am »
Suspiciously spam-like post.
 
For information on the best in trail lighting, see these reviews and then
shop carefully for the best buys:

http://www.gearreview.com/LEDs08_intro.php

http://www.gearreview.com/2007_led_lights.php

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

528
Gear Talk / Kamp Rite pop upcamper
« on: December 06, 2008, 09:39:24 am »
Last issue of AC mentioned it briefly. At50 pounds empty, I cannot
imagine anyone really wanting to haul one but I wish the company the
best of luck.

Google?
http://gatlinburgspokejunkie.blogspot.com/2008/10/bicycle-
camper.html
The Midget offers great opportunities to explore North America's
growing network of long distance bike trails, many of which have only
limited lodging possibilities. If I do the review, I'm looking at
transporting the trailer to either Atlanta (to bike the Silver Comet/Chief
Ladiga trails)or Orlando (to bike the Gen'l Van Fleet and Wilachoochee
State Trail). By the way, the trailer weighs @ 49 lbs and the bed weighs
@ 20 lbs.


david boise ID



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

529
Gear Talk / STI vs. Bar ends
« on: November 23, 2008, 10:30:15 pm »
Adventure Cyclist magazine ran an  article about STI a year or more
ago. Nashbar has some old Ultegras on super clearance for $150 and
their house brand is $150 but the Campy/Shiman/SRAM integrated
road brake/shifters are $350-$1,000. What's a Surly Long Haul
Trucker run these days? $1,095 with barcons. Add a fine set of STIs
and the bike is suddenly $1,500 and 25% to 35% of the entire
investment is on the handlebars. IIRC, there re 200 individual parts
between the pair.

I had 105s on my old Cannondale SX800, they were nice. But when I
had to replace one I freaked out.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

530
Gear Talk / Touring Bike
« on: November 15, 2008, 09:16:49 am »
> I am getting serious about the touring end of cycling and have
planned a couple of adventures. My price range is somewhere around
$1500. The bikes that I have been looking at are the Trek 520,  
Specialized, Fuji touring and the one I am leaning toward, the Surly
Long Haul Trucker.<

I have a touring partner with a Surly LHT. He's about 5'6" and really
likes the smaller bike. He's got it tricked out with all the racks.

You can research touring bikes on the main AC site. Several articles
from past issues, they do a comprehensive "how to buy a touring bike"
issue every year.

My prejudice is always to point such inquiries toward recumbents
because of the outrageous comfort. When I'm done with a long
segment on a group tour, I'm as tired as everyone else but nothing on
my body hurts.
I don't do self-contained touring and there's no question that a bent
and a trailer or a fully loaded bent might not cover as many miles as
you'd like. However, the reason to tour isn't to get there, it's all about
getting there.

see bentrideronline.com for a 'bent buyers' guide (a bit outdated but
the basics are still applicable) and tons of touring suggestions.

Have fun shopping, try not to make a quick decision. Don't forget to
look for used touring-appropirate bikes on cragslist.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

531
Gear Talk / Sealed bearings--How many miles?
« on: November 02, 2008, 07:47:07 pm »
I have a Shimano sealed bottom bracket rig with more than 27,000 miles
on it on my Tour Easy recumbent. To get 3k out of a top-of-the-line
bearing implies much.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

532
Gear Talk / Dry Feet
« on: October 10, 2008, 10:17:48 pm »
I hope you get better advice.
Cycle Oregon is always in September and we hit mountains often. We
see weather (altho not this year). Tent, bike clothes, camp clothes, bed
clothes, sleeping bag... everything can be either soaked or damp. and
when things get wet in Oregon, they say wet until the sun comes out
for 10-15 hours.
There's no way to stay dry in Oregon's rain, it's often moving sideways.
If you dislike wet bike shoes, wear bike sandals. You cna wear
neoprene socks but your feet will just get all wrinkly and deyhyrdated.
You can wear neoprene or Goretex shoe booties but they really don't
help in storms or if you're on your bike for many hours.

The only thing I've ever been able to do when my feet get wet is stop
and dry them. Same for socks and shoes. But it's impossible to dry
water logged wool bike socks without lots of heat and patience. Drying
shoes takes even more patience and less heat.

david boise ID


go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

533
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: December 29, 2008, 10:00:04 pm »
Hope future seekers will find this thread and read all the way through. I
recently came across this fascinating take on the classic alcohol stove:

http://www.csun.edu/~mjurey/penny.html

By pressurizing the alcohol reservoir, efficiency is dramatically
improved. You will need a windscreen. Heck, every stove needs a
screen.

bogiesan



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

534
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: November 13, 2008, 10:58:53 pm »
Found this on backpacker.com
http://www.backpacker.com/gear/ask_kristin/11
A.} Alcohol stoves definitely have their limitations (mainly cold
weather), but I've had really good luck with them up to 14,000 feet in
summer temperatures. My favorite alcohol stove is the Caldera Kitchen
( antigravitygear.com ), which incorporates burner, windscreen, pot,
and lid to create a stable and efficient system that boils three cups of
liquid in about eight minutes. It comes in a variety of configurations so
that you can use your existing pots, but the version I tested weighed
only 10 ounces, complete with a one-quart lidded, insulated plastic
container which doubles as a bowl, cup, and carrying case. In chilly
weather, however, you're probably better off going with a lightweight
canister stove it will give you much better boil times, which you'll
appreciate when you're freezing your tail off and jonesing for a hot
drink.


go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

535
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: October 25, 2008, 11:30:22 pm »
> I am going to use a water bottle (appropriately marked) to hold the
alcohol <

Water bottle? What kind of water bottle? You want an absolutely
dependable and positive seal and you need room for the fuel to
expand.

What you want is bottle that is labeled "approved for fuels."

What you don't want is alcohol leaking into your panniers.

david boise ID



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

536
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: October 15, 2008, 10:35:50 pm »
That would not have been my choice for your weight consideration but
most Colemans have a nice simmer, crucial if you're going to try to live
on your own real cooking rather than just boiling water.

Please come back after your trips and tell us how you got on, eh?

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

537
Gear Talk / Racks & Panniers
« on: October 11, 2008, 09:31:10 am »
On racks:
the issue is matching the mounting system to your bike. This is far
more complicated than you realize. All you have to do is look at some
of the mounting option packages that the major rack mfrs offer. You
may need adapters to attach to the seatpost, frame, rear dropouts, and
compensate for fenders and, if you have disk brakes, everything gets
more complex by an order of magnitude.

If your application is simple and direct, get them online and do the job
yourself. If you have a complicated installation, pay your LBS wrench to
take care of you.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

538
Gear Talk / Racks & Panniers
« on: October 11, 2008, 09:25:44 am »
Arkel makes great gear, so does Axiom, REI, Jandd, Vaude... must be
forty or more good pannier mfrs.  
Many of the links on this site have changed, all you have to do is erase
the text so you end up at the home pages:
http://www.mikebentley.com/bike/panniers.htm

As a commuter, I use panniers every day. I recently got some Axiom
Monsoons. They're totally waterproof with a rolll-down top flap with a
clip similar to rafting dry bags.
Verdict: Great bags for transport, a completely frustrating hassle when
it comes to getting in and out of them. You want to make sure you're
totally packed and ready to go before you seal these up.
What I would do next time: buy a good side-opener with an auxiliary
rain cover.

REI's new series of green/gray panniers features waterproof zippers.
Far more convenient to get in and out of them but the jury's still out on
their waterproofness in real road conditions with driving rain and
spray.

Your clothing questions might be better addressed as a separate
question. but clothing for touring is totally personal. There are dozens
of books on the topic.

Watch your budget. You do NOT need high zoot equipment to enjoy
touring in all forms of weather except possibly for snow.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

539
Gear Talk / Ortlieb Dry Bag
« on: September 24, 2008, 09:07:03 pm »
No reason to pack your thermarest in a waterproof bag.
If you pack your tent in a waterproof bag, do not put anything else in
the same bag. My sleeping bag is down; it goes in its own bag. If it
looks like rain or it will be in a bag or duffle with other wet items, my
down sleeping bag goes into a waterproof bag made of silicon nylon.

I often had to pack a damp tent backpacking. Since it's already damp,
leaving it on the outside of the pack was not an issue, even hiking in
rain. You want to protect items that are dry from getting and prevent
wet stuff from getting dry stuff damp.

Mildew isn't an issue where I live unless your stuff stays packed wet for
days which is just stupid. I have no experience backpacking or bike
touring in situations where it's raining every day. I've always had a day
or two to dry stuff out. it's worth taking a day off when the sun comes
out.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

540
Gear Talk / touring seat
« on: September 14, 2008, 08:06:25 pm »
I run a recumbent, my seat is all about comfort.
How long till you start your adventure?
You may need enough time and miles to evaluate two or more saddles.
At least one mfr has recently introduced a line of suspended saddles. I
think it's Topeak DBA Allay.
http://www.allaysaddles.com/
http://www.allaysaddles.com/products/unisex/Racing1_1_m

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

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