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Messages - bogiesan

Pages: 1 ... 34 35 [36] 37 38 ... 43
526
Gear Talk / Dry Feet
« on: October 10, 2008, 10:17:48 pm »
I hope you get better advice.
Cycle Oregon is always in September and we hit mountains often. We
see weather (altho not this year). Tent, bike clothes, camp clothes, bed
clothes, sleeping bag... everything can be either soaked or damp. and
when things get wet in Oregon, they say wet until the sun comes out
for 10-15 hours.
There's no way to stay dry in Oregon's rain, it's often moving sideways.
If you dislike wet bike shoes, wear bike sandals. You cna wear
neoprene socks but your feet will just get all wrinkly and deyhyrdated.
You can wear neoprene or Goretex shoe booties but they really don't
help in storms or if you're on your bike for many hours.

The only thing I've ever been able to do when my feet get wet is stop
and dry them. Same for socks and shoes. But it's impossible to dry
water logged wool bike socks without lots of heat and patience. Drying
shoes takes even more patience and less heat.

david boise ID


go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

527
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: December 29, 2008, 10:00:04 pm »
Hope future seekers will find this thread and read all the way through. I
recently came across this fascinating take on the classic alcohol stove:

http://www.csun.edu/~mjurey/penny.html

By pressurizing the alcohol reservoir, efficiency is dramatically
improved. You will need a windscreen. Heck, every stove needs a
screen.

bogiesan



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

528
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: November 13, 2008, 10:58:53 pm »
Found this on backpacker.com
http://www.backpacker.com/gear/ask_kristin/11
A.} Alcohol stoves definitely have their limitations (mainly cold
weather), but I've had really good luck with them up to 14,000 feet in
summer temperatures. My favorite alcohol stove is the Caldera Kitchen
( antigravitygear.com ), which incorporates burner, windscreen, pot,
and lid to create a stable and efficient system that boils three cups of
liquid in about eight minutes. It comes in a variety of configurations so
that you can use your existing pots, but the version I tested weighed
only 10 ounces, complete with a one-quart lidded, insulated plastic
container which doubles as a bowl, cup, and carrying case. In chilly
weather, however, you're probably better off going with a lightweight
canister stove it will give you much better boil times, which you'll
appreciate when you're freezing your tail off and jonesing for a hot
drink.


go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

529
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: October 25, 2008, 11:30:22 pm »
> I am going to use a water bottle (appropriately marked) to hold the
alcohol <

Water bottle? What kind of water bottle? You want an absolutely
dependable and positive seal and you need room for the fuel to
expand.

What you want is bottle that is labeled "approved for fuels."

What you don't want is alcohol leaking into your panniers.

david boise ID



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

530
Gear Talk / Touring Stove
« on: October 15, 2008, 10:35:50 pm »
That would not have been my choice for your weight consideration but
most Colemans have a nice simmer, crucial if you're going to try to live
on your own real cooking rather than just boiling water.

Please come back after your trips and tell us how you got on, eh?

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

531
Gear Talk / Racks & Panniers
« on: October 11, 2008, 09:31:10 am »
On racks:
the issue is matching the mounting system to your bike. This is far
more complicated than you realize. All you have to do is look at some
of the mounting option packages that the major rack mfrs offer. You
may need adapters to attach to the seatpost, frame, rear dropouts, and
compensate for fenders and, if you have disk brakes, everything gets
more complex by an order of magnitude.

If your application is simple and direct, get them online and do the job
yourself. If you have a complicated installation, pay your LBS wrench to
take care of you.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

532
Gear Talk / Racks & Panniers
« on: October 11, 2008, 09:25:44 am »
Arkel makes great gear, so does Axiom, REI, Jandd, Vaude... must be
forty or more good pannier mfrs.  
Many of the links on this site have changed, all you have to do is erase
the text so you end up at the home pages:
http://www.mikebentley.com/bike/panniers.htm

As a commuter, I use panniers every day. I recently got some Axiom
Monsoons. They're totally waterproof with a rolll-down top flap with a
clip similar to rafting dry bags.
Verdict: Great bags for transport, a completely frustrating hassle when
it comes to getting in and out of them. You want to make sure you're
totally packed and ready to go before you seal these up.
What I would do next time: buy a good side-opener with an auxiliary
rain cover.

REI's new series of green/gray panniers features waterproof zippers.
Far more convenient to get in and out of them but the jury's still out on
their waterproofness in real road conditions with driving rain and
spray.

Your clothing questions might be better addressed as a separate
question. but clothing for touring is totally personal. There are dozens
of books on the topic.

Watch your budget. You do NOT need high zoot equipment to enjoy
touring in all forms of weather except possibly for snow.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

533
Gear Talk / Ortlieb Dry Bag
« on: September 24, 2008, 09:07:03 pm »
No reason to pack your thermarest in a waterproof bag.
If you pack your tent in a waterproof bag, do not put anything else in
the same bag. My sleeping bag is down; it goes in its own bag. If it
looks like rain or it will be in a bag or duffle with other wet items, my
down sleeping bag goes into a waterproof bag made of silicon nylon.

I often had to pack a damp tent backpacking. Since it's already damp,
leaving it on the outside of the pack was not an issue, even hiking in
rain. You want to protect items that are dry from getting and prevent
wet stuff from getting dry stuff damp.

Mildew isn't an issue where I live unless your stuff stays packed wet for
days which is just stupid. I have no experience backpacking or bike
touring in situations where it's raining every day. I've always had a day
or two to dry stuff out. it's worth taking a day off when the sun comes
out.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

534
Gear Talk / touring seat
« on: September 14, 2008, 08:06:25 pm »
I run a recumbent, my seat is all about comfort.
How long till you start your adventure?
You may need enough time and miles to evaluate two or more saddles.
At least one mfr has recently introduced a line of suspended saddles. I
think it's Topeak DBA Allay.
http://www.allaysaddles.com/
http://www.allaysaddles.com/products/unisex/Racing1_1_m

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

535
Gear Talk / Tandem Roof Top Rack
« on: September 04, 2008, 10:36:38 am »
http://www.hostelshoppe.com/cgi-bin/search.pl?category=202500

A sliding rail system that can be DIY if you're handy with your tools:
http://www.hostelshoppe.com/cgi-bin/readitem.pl?
Accessory=1157062737

I have friends with this Draftmaster, they love it. But that's what I'd
expect them to say after the investment.
http://www.hostelshoppe.com/cgi-bin/readitem.pl?
Accessory=1027022491

Myself, I cannot imagine carrying my tandem-sized long wheel base
recumbent on a roof or hitch. No, I want it where i can see it: in a van,
in a pickup bed, or in a trailer.

In the back of Adventure Cyclist magazine you will find ads for several
tandem shops.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

536
Gear Talk / Trailer or panniers
« on: July 12, 2008, 12:51:17 pm »
I am consider using a lightspeed Sabre, a tri bike i alreadey have ?
any thoughts. I am riding to clear my head and was thinking of dooing
6 days on one off at around 70 miles a day, feel free to tell em if u
think i am nuts, and or any constructive advice.


Are you nuts? No, not yet. But you will be a few days after you start
this misadventure. An unsupported long distance road tour is
complicated. It is not a good place to get one's head clear unless you
are already well on your way to being comfortable with your life and
your emotions. A tri bike, IMNSHO, is totally inappropriate for day after
day in the saddle.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

537
Gear Talk / Communications on tour
« on: June 28, 2008, 09:30:25 am »
I do not understand the need to stay in contact but that's just me. We
have found cell phones to be more than adequate. In those rare places
where phones don't work... you do it the old fashioned way: wait.
Maybe you backtrack. Maybe you let them take care of themselves.
Depends on your relationship and who's carrying the food.

solar charging systems can be easily researched on google. The payoff
is still rather negative; you carry more weight with the charger and
receive less output than you might by carrying the dedicated charger
and using electrical outlets or buying AAs along the route. Depends on
what you need to keep charged. For isntance, two-way radios take lots
of power to transmit. GPS takes lots of power. You may not be able to
keep both systems charged with a single solar unit.
If you decide it may work for you, try to standardize your energy needs
on a single size battery, say, AA.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

538
Gear Talk / Handlebar bag what to do ?
« on: June 12, 2008, 12:51:23 am »
I don't understand what you're trying to accomplish. You need more
space to hold stuff? A map window? Shopping bag-sized panniers? Why
do you want a should strap on a trunk bag? leave it on the bike and put
a shoulder bag in it.
You don't need the aero bars for everyday riding or shopping so take
them off. They're a goofy affectation unless you're on tour or running
time trials.  

Topeak probably has the best selection of trunks that include
expansion options.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

539
Gear Talk / MTB for touring
« on: June 10, 2008, 12:42:27 am »
Neither. Or either.
If you are serious about the sport of adventure cycling, either of these
bikes will handle your first several thousand miles of touring. Afer that
you will either upgrade, modify, or replace the bike.

The problem with 20-25 year old bikes is the amount of rehab you
may need to do to make it road-worthy and dependable. Take it to a
dependable wrench and get out your Visa. You'll need hubs, rims or
wheels, chainrings, cogs, chain, shifters, mechs, brake pads, and the
dafety check may find cracked welds or bent frame parts. Might be far
easier and cheaper to get a newer bike with more current technologies.

Since you're large and are using a mountain bike as a base, be sure
you like the shock or run a shock seat post.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

540
Gear Talk / NEW BIKE FOR TOUR
« on: August 20, 2008, 11:00:06 pm »
> I live in New York City and was wondering if anyone could suggest a
shop that could help me with the purchase. <

I'd start by narrowing your brand choices to, say, four or five. Hit their
sites and search for LBS in your area. Spend a few weekends visiting
ten shops and chatting with the staff. I think you'll know when the vibe
is right.

You need to be prepared: know what you're looking for, what you want
to spend for the bike and ALL accessories, and know the tricks of the
trade so you can avoid being ripped off or led astray or into a higher
tier than your budget allows.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

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