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Messages - bogiesan

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526
Gear Talk / Water bottles and bisephenol-A
« on: November 02, 2008, 07:51:23 pm »
> I also know that bottled water clearly states in the fine print not to
refill them, and this is supposedly because the rate of leaching
increases with the handling of the bottles.  It seems logical that the
rate of leaching at some point would have to decrease as the bottles
are reused over time.   <

There are many valid and some mythic reasons not to refill such bottles
but the most important is avoiding bacterial contamination, not BPA.

> Anecdotally: I took a long day ride last weekend and couldnt find my
fancy Swiss water bottle so I filled a no-name plastic bottle I was given
at the Seattle to Portland, STP, charity ride last summer.  The taste of
plastic was very strong. <

The taste of plastic implies nothing about the possible presence of
BPA.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

527
Gear Talk / Water bottles and bisephenol-A
« on: June 21, 2008, 10:10:03 am »
Perfect solution: Use glass bottles.

See the wiki for some objective information about this silliness. You
get exposed to more volatile, reactive, immediately harmful, and
absorptive contaminants of one kind or another just mowing your yard
or lubricating your chain. Ever seen what that organic orange peel
solvent does to plastic? The wax in White Lightning is a petrochemical,
contributing to global warming, making us more dependent on foreign
oil, so using a chain lube really messes with any claims you can make
that biking reduces your carbon footprint.

david boise ID


go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

528
Gear Talk / Getting lower gearing
« on: May 30, 2008, 12:26:22 am »
> My hope is to do 55-65 a day for 5 days then a rest day on tour. The
prudent thing to do is wait until July to see where I'm at.

I'd suggest you find a supported tour for July or August and enjoy
yourself, see if you like touring. Then see about going it alone and self-
supported.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

529
Gear Talk / msr whisperlite or simmerlite stove
« on: May 03, 2008, 01:36:50 am »
Ah, the Esbit tablets! Thanks for the memories. I've used these rascals
while trying to go ultralight with my backpacking gear. Very interesting
product, does the job and the ultimate in low tech. I wonder if REI still
sells the little brass Euro alcohol stove? No. But REI has a more modern
and more expensive unit: http://www.rei.com/product/752671

Define your need for stove performance and then do not buy one! Try
to borrow one from your backpacking friends. Most backpackers have
two or three stoves.

bogiesan

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

530
Gear Talk / msr whisperlite or simmerlite stove
« on: May 02, 2008, 12:44:48 am »
A stove is not an item on which to scrimp if you are depending on it.
Otherwise, don't take one. Or go ultralight with an alcohol burner.

You can research stoves on most of the backpacking sites. Those folks
know from stoves.

Backpacking with other nuts, I've used several generations of the
Whisperlite but never owned one myself. It was designed to do one and
only one job: boil water. if you need to gently cook pancakes or
omelets, you must have an adjustable stove with a very wide burner
that will heat the entire base of a frying pan.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

531
Gear Talk / Both panniers AND trailer at the same time?
« on: April 23, 2008, 10:47:11 pm »
IMportant in any case: do not stuff your luggage full when you set off.
Leave lots of room for stuff you will pick up along the way.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

532
Gear Talk / hauling child, plus - trailer recommendations?
« on: April 19, 2008, 11:30:15 pm »
These things tend to have short useful lives as kids grow up quick
and the parents don't want to have the now unneeded trailer


I had one of the very first Burleys in Boise ID back in 1983 when my
son was 2-1/2. I kept it long past the time my boy was no longer
interested in riding to interesting places with his father. It hauled tons
of groceries.

Some real advice. Don't depend on the screen to protect your precious
cargo. Get really good fenders.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

533
Gear Talk / Sore butts
« on: June 04, 2008, 11:17:12 pm »
> I have heard recumbents are hard on hills.

There are silly myths about any type of bike. Riding a bike is fun for
me, it's not about getting to the top of the hill before someone who
has 30 years and 30 pounds on me.

I use a Macintosh because it's a fun and engaging machine. My PC just
makes me angry.
I play go because compared to go's 10 to the 36th power possible
games chess is literally predictable.
I ride a recumbent because when I'm done with a century I'm as tired as
everyone else is but nothing on my body hurts. Not a thing. That's
become gloriously important to me as I've gotten older.

But the main reason I play go instead of chess, use a Mac instead of a
widows device, and ride a recumbent is simple: almost no one else
does any of those things.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

534
Gear Talk / Sore butts
« on: April 15, 2008, 12:04:29 am »
> Not quite ready for a recummbent though.

But you're ready to try different saddles, different fittings from
different bike pros? Try to be open minded about this. You may never
be comfortable on your existing bike, which is a shame, but that allows
you, once you accept the reality, of shopping for another bike. I'm not
going to try to convince you to look at recumbents, but shopping for a
touring steed is fun, exciting, and hopelessly confusing.
Shopping for a recumbent is actually much more difficult since there
are so many different tire size combinations and wheelbase options.

david boise ID



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

535
Gear Talk / Fishing for Advice
« on: April 09, 2008, 01:14:44 am »
Taking one's fly rod anywhere and everywhere is a topic that's got to
be well covered among the fly fishing people of the world, I should
think.

when i flew kites, my 48" carrying tubes were simply bungeed to the
top tube. Worked fine around town and many of my kites were far
more expensive than your rods. But touring? If I was still flying, I'd find
kites made for touring rather than figuring out how to safely transport
my prized stunters.

david boise ID.

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

536
Gear Talk / Folding Bikes on Airplanes
« on: April 09, 2008, 01:16:59 am »
Those British folders, Brompton, Dahon, and Bike Friday all have their
own user forums. I'd start there.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

537
Gear Talk / Pannier input please
« on: April 09, 2008, 01:19:37 am »
Arkel seems to be floating to the top and they make great tools. But
there are at least twenty other pannier makers that make excellent,
useful, or merely good values in panniers. Arkel is built to last forver.
That means they're heavy. Do you really need that kind of quality/
protection/curability or can you get by with less weight, less durability,
and no waterproofing? Just put a couple of garbage bags inside.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

538
Gear Talk / Pannier input please
« on: March 30, 2008, 10:19:55 pm »
This site is a bit out of date but still worth a look:
 
http://www.mikebentley.com/bike/panniers.htm

Lots of dead links.

If you need superb current tech, Arkel, Ortleid, Vaude, and Topeak
can't be beat. But you might consider old world classics from
Carradice.

Performance, Nashbar, and REI have excellent values on closeouts,
You've got to shop carefully, though.

david boise ID
 

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

539
Gear Talk / Which sleeping bag?
« on: March 22, 2008, 10:15:53 am »
on closeout for $60 and it weighs less than 3 pounds complete with
stuff sack. It even came with a loose ventilated storage sack.  


Sierra Trading Post and Campmor usually have far better values on deep
discounted items than REI Outlet. (I often feel ripped off by REI these days
but that's just me, member for more than 30 years).

david boise ID




go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

540
Gear Talk / Which sleeping bag?
« on: March 21, 2008, 12:25:45 am »
If weight is a primary concern, invest a few hours hunting through
ultralight backpacking sites. There are only three places you can save
significant weight: tent, sleeping bag, pad. Everything else is either
necessary (but can possibly be reduced in mass) or simply cannot be
reduced any further. You can carry a 1 pound silnylon tarp and a 2
pound bug screen or a six pound tent. You can carry an eight pound
poly bag or a 2 pound down bag and some extra tights.

Here in dry ol' Idaho, down is queen but I try to take a poly bag on
Cycle Oregon tours cuz we know we'll see rain on at least two out of
seven days. If you know how to take care of your gear, down will serve
you well but, if you're a novice, take poly. I carry two down bags, a
one-pounder and a two pounder. If it gets really cold, they nest.

(You might want to take an interesting lightweight item called  "vapor
barrier liner." Hard to find these days but it can add about ten degrees
to any bag or keep you dry in a wet bag.)

Sleeping pads are totally subjective. On a supported tour, I make them
haul my 6 pound, 2-1/2 inch thick Thermarest. If I'm carrying it
myself, I go for the Cascade Design egg-crate minimum pad.

david boise ID


go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

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