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Messages - bogiesan

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541
Gear Talk / Bike Selection
« on: February 18, 2008, 10:19:50 am »
> Finally, are there options I should consider?

Lord, yes: recumbent.
Other: used bike. A used Cannondale is still a fabulous bike. I've had
two Cannondales, loved them, especially my road wedgie with the little
shock. They used to make a touring model with their Silk Road
headshok, 5/8" of travel, probably from 2000-2002. Find one.

A quick visit to the C'dale site shows to my amazed disappointment
that they have dropped the Silk Road shock systems from their range
of bikes. Total bummer.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

542
Gear Talk / Pannier Sizing Question
« on: January 06, 2008, 10:44:22 am »
> I say this because you can only put two panniers and a seat pack on
a 'bent. For long distance self contained touring,<

Not necessarily, depends on the recumbent. Many will accept front
panniers easily. Many European 'bents can be outfitted with front,
midship, rear, and a trunk. (I will state again, if you have room, you
will fill it with unnecessary stuff.)

The main AC site has an excellent article on trailers vs panniers that
includes a short mention of recumbents and tandems.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

543
Gear Talk / Pannier Sizing Question
« on: December 29, 2007, 12:15:53 pm »
Welcome to the family. Be sure to put several thousand miles on the
recumbent before lighting off on your tour. Visit bentrideronline.com
and search the touring forum for helpful advice.  

Here's the only thing I know about going self-contained: If you have
large panniers, you will fill them with stuff you don't need and
shouldn't be carrying. Research "ultralight backpacking" and then adapt
this practical advice to your physical needs and comfort levels.

terracycle.com carries pannier selected carefully for 'bent compatibility.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

544
Gear Talk / trailer pulling and old guys
« on: December 16, 2007, 03:36:07 pm »
Join a local club, you can probably find one for older citizens but look
for the words non-competitive and no-drop in the club listings. Ride
with them, don't try to race with them.
Enter every charity ride in your local area this season.
JOin a gym and start a rigorous but safe cardio plan after you've
discussed it with your doctor. Join the spinning sessions.

I'd suggest you investigate a recumbent bike for touring but I say that
to everyone. I'm about 55, I put 5k miles on my Tour Easy every year
and plan to keep doing so till I can't.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

545
Gear Talk / Changing from Drop bars to Straight bars
« on: December 16, 2007, 03:28:45 pm »
 I say, take all the pressure off your hands and arms, have a big comfy
seat, and ride heads-up all the time-- get a recumbent.

My personal prejudice, of course, not everyone can ride a recumbent on
tour and enjoy it.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

546
Gear Talk / Best Headlamps / Handlebar lamps
« on: December 02, 2007, 09:37:55 pm »
"Best" is, of course, relative. I've been commuting for decades but I do
not ride trails or tour at night.

During the last twenty winters my lighting needs have changed with
my commute distance. I'm now riding a 12 mile round trip that takes
about 35 minutes on sub-32 degree mornings and 25 minutes return
in the evenings. That's about an hour each day. These days I run three
lights: a NiteRider HID, a NiteRider halogen, and a Cateye 500 LED.
They each have different uses and battery run times but the LED is
mainly for backup. I run two Cateye wide/skinny 5-LED blinkies and a
Blacburn super bright blinkie for taillights. I also have the NiteRider red
LED rig but the cable is broken, just need to solder it. Someday this
spring maybe.

I sometimes add more lights depending on weather conditions and I
have a reflective vest and an AlertShirt with five big stripes of retro-
reflective tape.

I ride past three schools on my route and I see everything that's
WRONG with bike lights every morning. If you're commuting, you need
to be seen. Flashers are great for that but they don't help you see the
road.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

547
Gear Talk / rain gear
« on: November 18, 2007, 12:38:03 pm »
Do you like the breathable suff or are you all about waterproofness?

Depending on where you travel, it's more important to be warm than dry.
Here in Iderho, you can count on your stuff drying out in a day, two max.
On Cycle Oregon, however, if your gear gets wet on the first day it can
stay wet for the entire tour.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

548
Gear Talk / Touring Pedals
« on: November 18, 2007, 12:41:02 pm »
"Touring" implies you're going places where you can't just drop into a
bike shop and get parts. Carrying replacements for weird pedal systems
is a personal decision. That's how I ended up back at SPDs after trying
Frogs and Bebops and some Cranks. You can get SPD parts anywhere.

On my recumbent, the security and power boost of being clipped in is
essential and pleasant.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

549
Gear Talk / Rear Derailleur
« on: October 27, 2007, 08:21:23 am »
Just be sure the new one has the same cage clearance as the one you're
replacing. Couple of different sizes depending on your biggest cog. Many
touring bikes have larger lows.

Assuming you take better care of the rest of your rig than you did your
rear mech, replacing the whole thing is definitely the better idea.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

550
Gear Talk / Touring Friendly LBS in D/FW
« on: October 06, 2007, 09:46:27 am »
I'd find some bike mfrs you like and ask them who sells their bikes in
your market area. Imagine trying to find a bike shop that is touring
friendly and understand recumbents in Boise ID. We have neither.

I know of only a precious few shops that proudly cater to all forms of
the bicycle world but it's not really something that you can expect.
Hardly any retail outlet can cater to all forms of a sport or niche. For
instance, it is rare to find a camera shop that carries 4x5 view cameras,
underwater housings for dive photographers and a huge selection of
the hottest selling point and shoot digitals.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

551
Gear Talk / USS Recumbent water :)
« on: October 04, 2007, 11:01:48 am »
The mfr of your bike should be your second stop after you spend a few
hours exploring bentrideronline.com where you will find tons of USS
discussions from hundreds of riders.

I second the bladder advice. Hacking water bottle cages is kinda silly,
just a set of compromises on mechanical integrity and accessibility.
I have the same problem with headlight mounts on my Easy Racers
bike. Decades ago, the original designer had a huge supply of small-
diameter tubing and he used it for the handlebar crossbrace. Ever since
then, we have all been trying to hack a decent solution for mounting
any and all conventional handlebar accessories. Nothing really works
well except expensive third party solutions.

david boise ID



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

552
Gear Talk / Laptop to carry on bike trip?
« on: October 04, 2007, 11:05:43 am »
You're already underway o this doesn't matter much but I'd suggest an
iPhone.

However, I cannot imagine traveling with a laptop or expensive
electronics. That much money tied up in easily stolen stuff, too much
to keep worrying about, batteries, finding Internet links, keeping it dry
and out of the dust... How did we EVER get along for the last century of
bike travel without all that stuff?

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

553
Gear Talk / Tire Pumps for Long Tours
« on: September 16, 2007, 09:16:32 pm »
There are several frame pumps that have fold out legs or floor
platforms. Topeak makes a few models, look for the Road Morph, very
popular, I've got one. Works great.

http://www.topeak.com/2007/products/minipumps/roadmorphg.php

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

554
Gear Talk / USS Recumbent Mirror
« on: September 16, 2007, 09:29:39 pm »
http://www.rei.com/product/723518

I switched to convex bar end mirrors a couple of years ago, many on
the market. As a year-round commuter, I kept breaking or losing my
helmet mounted mirrors.
This unit is easily adapted, with a bit of messing around, to USS
recumbent, however, with the mirror so far away from your eyes, the
convex style doesn't give you much in the way of detail; one reason
USS and trikes tend to use helmet mirrors.

Editorially, it is a myth that, when riding a recumbent, it is more
difficult to turn one's head to check the rear or side. The idea is that
the action tends to swing the bike dangerously. Tosh, just takes
practice. It is, however, a bit tedious so I think we use mirrors more
assertively than upright riders. Still, it's silly not to ride with a mirror,
don't you think? I can't ride anywhere without my mirrors anymore than
I could drive without mirrors.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

555
Gear Talk / The $64,000 question...Riding gloves!
« on: September 16, 2007, 09:10:34 pm »
Google crochet bicycle glove and you'll find only three models, a black/
red/blue stripe that is badged by Pearl and Nashbar or Performance I
bought three paris about ten yearts ago, just now going through my
last pair), and my next pair at:

http://harriscyclery.net/itemdetails.cfm?catalogId=39&id=2240

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

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