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Messages - bogiesan

Pages: 1 ... 35 36 [37] 38 39 ... 43
541
Gear Talk / Tandem Roof Top Rack
« on: September 04, 2008, 10:36:38 am »
http://www.hostelshoppe.com/cgi-bin/search.pl?category=202500

A sliding rail system that can be DIY if you're handy with your tools:
http://www.hostelshoppe.com/cgi-bin/readitem.pl?
Accessory=1157062737

I have friends with this Draftmaster, they love it. But that's what I'd
expect them to say after the investment.
http://www.hostelshoppe.com/cgi-bin/readitem.pl?
Accessory=1027022491

Myself, I cannot imagine carrying my tandem-sized long wheel base
recumbent on a roof or hitch. No, I want it where i can see it: in a van,
in a pickup bed, or in a trailer.

In the back of Adventure Cyclist magazine you will find ads for several
tandem shops.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

542
Gear Talk / Trailer or panniers
« on: July 12, 2008, 12:51:17 pm »
I am consider using a lightspeed Sabre, a tri bike i alreadey have ?
any thoughts. I am riding to clear my head and was thinking of dooing
6 days on one off at around 70 miles a day, feel free to tell em if u
think i am nuts, and or any constructive advice.


Are you nuts? No, not yet. But you will be a few days after you start
this misadventure. An unsupported long distance road tour is
complicated. It is not a good place to get one's head clear unless you
are already well on your way to being comfortable with your life and
your emotions. A tri bike, IMNSHO, is totally inappropriate for day after
day in the saddle.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

543
Gear Talk / Communications on tour
« on: June 28, 2008, 09:30:25 am »
I do not understand the need to stay in contact but that's just me. We
have found cell phones to be more than adequate. In those rare places
where phones don't work... you do it the old fashioned way: wait.
Maybe you backtrack. Maybe you let them take care of themselves.
Depends on your relationship and who's carrying the food.

solar charging systems can be easily researched on google. The payoff
is still rather negative; you carry more weight with the charger and
receive less output than you might by carrying the dedicated charger
and using electrical outlets or buying AAs along the route. Depends on
what you need to keep charged. For isntance, two-way radios take lots
of power to transmit. GPS takes lots of power. You may not be able to
keep both systems charged with a single solar unit.
If you decide it may work for you, try to standardize your energy needs
on a single size battery, say, AA.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

544
Gear Talk / Handlebar bag what to do ?
« on: June 12, 2008, 12:51:23 am »
I don't understand what you're trying to accomplish. You need more
space to hold stuff? A map window? Shopping bag-sized panniers? Why
do you want a should strap on a trunk bag? leave it on the bike and put
a shoulder bag in it.
You don't need the aero bars for everyday riding or shopping so take
them off. They're a goofy affectation unless you're on tour or running
time trials.  

Topeak probably has the best selection of trunks that include
expansion options.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

545
Gear Talk / MTB for touring
« on: June 10, 2008, 12:42:27 am »
Neither. Or either.
If you are serious about the sport of adventure cycling, either of these
bikes will handle your first several thousand miles of touring. Afer that
you will either upgrade, modify, or replace the bike.

The problem with 20-25 year old bikes is the amount of rehab you
may need to do to make it road-worthy and dependable. Take it to a
dependable wrench and get out your Visa. You'll need hubs, rims or
wheels, chainrings, cogs, chain, shifters, mechs, brake pads, and the
dafety check may find cracked welds or bent frame parts. Might be far
easier and cheaper to get a newer bike with more current technologies.

Since you're large and are using a mountain bike as a base, be sure
you like the shock or run a shock seat post.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

546
Gear Talk / NEW BIKE FOR TOUR
« on: August 20, 2008, 11:00:06 pm »
> I live in New York City and was wondering if anyone could suggest a
shop that could help me with the purchase. <

I'd start by narrowing your brand choices to, say, four or five. Hit their
sites and search for LBS in your area. Spend a few weekends visiting
ten shops and chatting with the staff. I think you'll know when the vibe
is right.

You need to be prepared: know what you're looking for, what you want
to spend for the bike and ALL accessories, and know the tricks of the
trade so you can avoid being ripped off or led astray or into a higher
tier than your budget allows.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

547
Gear Talk / Water bottles and bisephenol-A
« on: November 02, 2008, 07:51:23 pm »
> I also know that bottled water clearly states in the fine print not to
refill them, and this is supposedly because the rate of leaching
increases with the handling of the bottles.  It seems logical that the
rate of leaching at some point would have to decrease as the bottles
are reused over time.   <

There are many valid and some mythic reasons not to refill such bottles
but the most important is avoiding bacterial contamination, not BPA.

> Anecdotally: I took a long day ride last weekend and couldnt find my
fancy Swiss water bottle so I filled a no-name plastic bottle I was given
at the Seattle to Portland, STP, charity ride last summer.  The taste of
plastic was very strong. <

The taste of plastic implies nothing about the possible presence of
BPA.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

548
Gear Talk / Water bottles and bisephenol-A
« on: June 21, 2008, 10:10:03 am »
Perfect solution: Use glass bottles.

See the wiki for some objective information about this silliness. You
get exposed to more volatile, reactive, immediately harmful, and
absorptive contaminants of one kind or another just mowing your yard
or lubricating your chain. Ever seen what that organic orange peel
solvent does to plastic? The wax in White Lightning is a petrochemical,
contributing to global warming, making us more dependent on foreign
oil, so using a chain lube really messes with any claims you can make
that biking reduces your carbon footprint.

david boise ID


go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

549
Gear Talk / Getting lower gearing
« on: May 30, 2008, 12:26:22 am »
> My hope is to do 55-65 a day for 5 days then a rest day on tour. The
prudent thing to do is wait until July to see where I'm at.

I'd suggest you find a supported tour for July or August and enjoy
yourself, see if you like touring. Then see about going it alone and self-
supported.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

550
Gear Talk / msr whisperlite or simmerlite stove
« on: May 03, 2008, 01:36:50 am »
Ah, the Esbit tablets! Thanks for the memories. I've used these rascals
while trying to go ultralight with my backpacking gear. Very interesting
product, does the job and the ultimate in low tech. I wonder if REI still
sells the little brass Euro alcohol stove? No. But REI has a more modern
and more expensive unit: http://www.rei.com/product/752671

Define your need for stove performance and then do not buy one! Try
to borrow one from your backpacking friends. Most backpackers have
two or three stoves.

bogiesan

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

551
Gear Talk / msr whisperlite or simmerlite stove
« on: May 02, 2008, 12:44:48 am »
A stove is not an item on which to scrimp if you are depending on it.
Otherwise, don't take one. Or go ultralight with an alcohol burner.

You can research stoves on most of the backpacking sites. Those folks
know from stoves.

Backpacking with other nuts, I've used several generations of the
Whisperlite but never owned one myself. It was designed to do one and
only one job: boil water. if you need to gently cook pancakes or
omelets, you must have an adjustable stove with a very wide burner
that will heat the entire base of a frying pan.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

552
Gear Talk / Both panniers AND trailer at the same time?
« on: April 23, 2008, 10:47:11 pm »
IMportant in any case: do not stuff your luggage full when you set off.
Leave lots of room for stuff you will pick up along the way.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

553
Gear Talk / hauling child, plus - trailer recommendations?
« on: April 19, 2008, 11:30:15 pm »
These things tend to have short useful lives as kids grow up quick
and the parents don't want to have the now unneeded trailer


I had one of the very first Burleys in Boise ID back in 1983 when my
son was 2-1/2. I kept it long past the time my boy was no longer
interested in riding to interesting places with his father. It hauled tons
of groceries.

Some real advice. Don't depend on the screen to protect your precious
cargo. Get really good fenders.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

554
Gear Talk / Sore butts
« on: June 04, 2008, 11:17:12 pm »
> I have heard recumbents are hard on hills.

There are silly myths about any type of bike. Riding a bike is fun for
me, it's not about getting to the top of the hill before someone who
has 30 years and 30 pounds on me.

I use a Macintosh because it's a fun and engaging machine. My PC just
makes me angry.
I play go because compared to go's 10 to the 36th power possible
games chess is literally predictable.
I ride a recumbent because when I'm done with a century I'm as tired as
everyone else is but nothing on my body hurts. Not a thing. That's
become gloriously important to me as I've gotten older.

But the main reason I play go instead of chess, use a Mac instead of a
widows device, and ride a recumbent is simple: almost no one else
does any of those things.

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

555
Gear Talk / Sore butts
« on: April 15, 2008, 12:04:29 am »
> Not quite ready for a recummbent though.

But you're ready to try different saddles, different fittings from
different bike pros? Try to be open minded about this. You may never
be comfortable on your existing bike, which is a shame, but that allows
you, once you accept the reality, of shopping for another bike. I'm not
going to try to convince you to look at recumbents, but shopping for a
touring steed is fun, exciting, and hopelessly confusing.
Shopping for a recumbent is actually much more difficult since there
are so many different tire size combinations and wheelbase options.

david boise ID



go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."

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