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Messages - canalligators

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1
Routes / Re: New York State Bike Route 5 versus Erie Canalway Trail
« on: December 09, 2016, 02:37:55 pm »
...Does following the canalway slow you down much?    I typically ride at about 14 mph without gear on my bike.  Fully loaded with camping gear and with rest stops, I probably average 10 or 11 mph, but this is on paved highway surfaces.   Did this surface of the canalway slow you down much?

My opinion is that unpaved, improved trails such as the EC will slow you down about one gear.  (I have heard that trikes are affected more than bikes, which makes sense as they have 50% more wheels.)  In any case, you trade off a little speed for a nice traffic-free trail.  Your call.

Rolled stone chips/dust make a decent riding surface.  Unlike dirt or gravel, it retains most of its traction when wet, though wet conditions will result in a pasty coating on your bike.  You do kick up a bit of white stone dust, so if you're towing a kid trailer you want to make sure you have a full length rear fender or a generous mud flap.  For the front wheel on a recumbent tandem too, so your stoker isn't breathing all the dust.

2
Routes / Re: New York State Bike Route 5 versus Erie Canalway Trail
« on: December 05, 2016, 10:50:59 pm »
...Canalligators, what guide book are you referring to?   I'll be checking out your link to CrazyGuyOnABike shortly.

The Parks and Trails NY book, http://www.ptny.org/publications/cycling-guidebooks/cycling-the-erie-canal.

3
Routes / Re: New York State Bike Route 5 versus Erie Canalway Trail
« on: December 05, 2016, 03:15:55 pm »
Read all about it here https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=tS&doc_id=9422&v=Gw.

I highly recommend that you not use Bike 5 between Schenectady and Albany.  There is little lane space and lots of traffic.  Instead, use the Mohawk-Hudson trail, part of the Canalway Trail system.  I also recommend that you not use Bike 5 through Rochester; again, no lane space and heavy traffic.  The canal trail across Rochester is paved and a nice ride.

The canal trail is largely unpaved but improved, typically rolled stone dust.  The paved parts are the Mohawk-Hudson Trail, a stretch near Canajoharie, through Rochester and through Buffalo.  There are a few other places that are paved.

Get the Parks & Trails guide, for all the info on the trail parts.  Yes, the trail can be a challenge to follow in places.

You need to decide if you're going to go through Syracuse or around it to the north.  Going through is ok using the route in the guide book.  The advantages are that you can use the Old Erie Canal on the east, and the best canal museum is downtown.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me on the article guestbook.

4
Canada / Re: Bike transport by train
« on: November 30, 2016, 12:03:30 pm »
Have you looked at the Via Rail Canada site?

5
Gear Talk / Re: Long distance tour bike for small lady
« on: November 30, 2016, 12:01:36 pm »
If your mind is open, my wife is 5'2" and a Lightning P38 fit her well.

6
Gear Talk / Re: trailers vs panniers
« on: November 29, 2016, 01:08:19 pm »
staehpj1 summarizes it well.

Another factor is the terrain.  We use the trailer (BOB) in flat land for longer tours, when tandem/motel touring.  For shorter tours and mountainous terrain, we use panniers to reduce weight.  For solo touring, I might use the BOB even for mountain riding; it worked well for me in the Adirondacks.

I made a canvas bag for packing the trailer on Amtrak.

7
General Discussion / Re: trikes
« on: November 29, 2016, 12:59:45 pm »
I hear the same concern about being seen, regarding my two-wheeled recumbent.  The only time that being seen is a problem is in city traffic.

You want to get a machine that's good for touring.  Trikes generally are well suited.  Apply the same criteria as you would for any touring bike:
- Comfort, comfort, comfort
- Geared low enough (aim for low-20s gear-inches)
- Able to carry your desired load
- Handles well at very low speed
- Handles well at mountain pass descent speeds

Trikes are generally very good at most of these.  I have heard that some handle funny at very high speeds.  But I listed these in order of importance.

You might also consider a two-wheeled recumbent.  Be sure to test them with a load, though.  Some of them handle very well with a load, some do not.  My current bike handles well, loaded, at 3 mi/hr.  It also handles like a dream at 40+ mi/hr.  My previous recumbent got squirrely at 30+ or below five.  A long wheelbase bike I tested was marvelous by itself at 3 mi/hr but could not be controlled with a BOB trailer attached at that speed.

Short answer: try out lots of bikes, with loads attached.  I guess you could say the same for diamond frames.

8
Classifieds / Re: 20" Bike wheel
« on: November 28, 2016, 12:15:13 pm »
...Can use 406 or 559 tire.

You seem to have your numbers mixed up.  The 20" wheel is a 406, the first number (such as in 32-406) is the one that can vary.

9
Gear Talk / Re: Recommendation for front light?
« on: November 28, 2016, 12:10:58 pm »
I disagree with not bringing a light.  There will be times when you choose or need to ride in moderate or heavier rain, and the visibility will be important.  Ditto with a tail light.  I bring a small (but high quality) detachable LED headlight for these times, and for use in camp as a flashlight.

10
Mason County Campground, south of Luddington.

11
Routes / Re: Atlantic Coast Traffic - Bar Harbor going South in May '17
« on: November 17, 2016, 12:14:48 pm »
You can also leave the bike boxed and checked, and use a bikeshare bike.  Or transit.  Our large cities have pretty good transit, elsewhere it's very skimpy.

12
General Discussion / Re: One piece earphone while riding
« on: November 16, 2016, 02:50:33 pm »
There are many kinds of mirrors: bike mounted, helmet mounted, eyeglass mounted.  Quality varies, and they all have their plusses and minuses.  I summarized them in an article here:https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=tS&doc_id=5276&v=22

I encourage everyone to use a mirror.  I personally think they are far more important than helmets (which get lots of press).  Prevention!   Use whatever kind you like best, just buy and use one.
Last list update was 2011... Could do for a refresh?

Sent from my SM-T817V using Tapatalk

Yeah, it will bubble to the top of my priorities list one of these days.  If you want to do the research and pass the info, I'll update it.

13
General Discussion / Re: One piece earphone while riding
« on: November 15, 2016, 01:09:54 pm »
There are many kinds of mirrors: bike mounted, helmet mounted, eyeglass mounted.  Quality varies, and they all have their plusses and minuses.  I summarized them in an article here:https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=tS&doc_id=5276&v=22

I encourage everyone to use a mirror.  I personally think they are far more important than helmets (which get lots of press).  Prevention!   Use whatever kind you like best, just buy and use one.

14
General Discussion / Re: The Schwarzenetruber Amish.
« on: November 15, 2016, 01:04:15 pm »
By using the word "highway", do you mean limited access expressways, or just open roads?  In some places, highway=expressway, but in the US northeast, not always.

I travel a bit in upstate New York, and have never seen a minimum speed posted, even on the expressways.  In fact, the only time I remember one is on I-75 in Michigan, in the 1960s.  There is no minimum speed on non-expressways, there may be one on expressways. 

Also, in New York State, any road that is limited access (has exit and entrance ramps), is illegal for bike use - even if it's not posted as such.  I checked it out with DMV and DOT, as there's an expressway here that is not posted "No Bikes" and I was wondering.


15
I'd patch the current tube then carry it as your spare.  If you weren't planning to carry spare tubes, you should.

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