Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - DaveB

Pages: 1 ... 68 69 [70] 71 72 ... 103
1036
General Discussion / Re: Potential Resale Value
« on: August 30, 2009, 09:55:38 pm »
Generally used bikes lose a lot of their initial value very rapidly unless they are of great historical interest or can be shown to have been ridden by a very famous person. (I assume Lance's 2005 TdF winning bike is still worth a lot of money even used. :) )  Those owned by us ordinary folks aren't worth much.

You would be lucky to get 50% of the new cost back and that would require finding a willing buyer which will take some time.  Look on various Craigs List or E-bay sites to get a feel for what used touring bikes are going for. Unless you have absolutely no need for it back home, I'd ship it back after the trip.

1037
General Discussion / Re: ACA Maps are Way Small.
« on: August 30, 2009, 09:50:07 pm »
I expect AC has to balance legability with portability.  If the maps were much larger, they would be too awkward to fit in any handlebar bag holder or would cover such a small distance the number of sheets would be excessive.

1038
Gear Talk / Re: cranks
« on: August 29, 2009, 10:20:06 am »
I used hear that you replaced the chain and cluster together, and the rings every 3rd chain.
No, you change chainrings when they are worn out and not shifting properly. 

1039
General Discussion / Re: Why SPD pedals?
« on: August 29, 2009, 10:13:34 am »
Shimano did not license the SPD system to anyone.  It was invented in the early 1990s.  Its patent expired a few years later.  Then lots of Taiwanese Chinese companies started making copies of it.
If the SPD design was invented in the early 1990's, the patent wouldn't have expired until 17 years after it was granted or 2007 at the earliest.

If the design was patented in 1995 or later, the patent would still be in force as the term was changed to 20 years from the filing date.

The only possible way the Taiwanese, etc. could have legally copied the exact design is if it was patented in the early 1980's but not commercialized until much later.

1040
Gear Talk / Re: cranks
« on: August 28, 2009, 09:46:56 am »
I put more than 20k on my recumbent's bottom bracket and the cranks  have 34k on them. The chainrings have been replaced three times; rear cassette twice; five chains, maybe six.
david boise ID
I do have to ask why you changed your chainrings that often?  My experience is that under normal road use, chainrings last at least 20,000 miles and often myuch more.  I've gotten 30,000+ miles on several Shimano road cranks chainring sets and they still shifted cleanly and there was no chain skipping and, no I don't change chains all that often either.

The only truly worn out chainrings I've seen were on my son-in-laws bike.  He is a racer and very strong but it still took him 25,000 miles to wear them to the obvious replacement point.

1041
General Discussion / Re: Why SPD pedals?
« on: August 28, 2009, 09:39:24 am »

There are no regular pedals of any kind, road or mountain. Not even platforms or traps are regular any more.
SPD is a commonly used term that describes a more or less universally compatible cleat/pedal interface that Shimano has licensed to many mfrs. SPD is said to stand for Shimano Pedal Device but that's oepn for conjecture and argument.
david boise ID
For the record, "SPD" originally stood for "Shimano Pedaling Dynamics" and is a Shimano trademark.  You are correct that SPD has pretty much become a generic term for MTB-type clipless pedals whether made by Shimano, Look, Time, Wellgo or anyone else.  I'm sure Shimano's lawyers are busy defending the trademark. 

Shimano also applied the SPD term to their road pedals but they never dominated the market the way their MTB pedals do so it's not as much a catch-all term the way it is in the MTB world.

1042
Gear Talk / Re: cranks
« on: August 27, 2009, 09:14:26 pm »
2500 miles is still brand new for any decent crank, chainrings and bottom bracket unless the bike is ridden exclusively in harsh off-road conditions.  Are you experiencing any symptoms that indicate something is wrong?

1043
General Discussion / Re: Why SPD pedals?
« on: August 25, 2009, 10:08:09 pm »
I have never tried SPDs.
And what are we to do with this information?

1044
General Discussion / Re: Why SPD pedals?
« on: August 20, 2009, 06:04:42 pm »
Quote
Personally, I think the Shimano road SPD pedals are a pain because the cleat can only mount one one side,  and the cleat is incompatible with Shimano mountain pedals.

Shimano's current road pedals, the SPD-SL series, are pretty much "Look-alikes".  They take a very similar 3-bolt cleat, are one sided and a pain to walk in.  The MTB-type SPD are the only ones to consider for touring applications where being able to walk is a requirement.

1045
General Discussion / Re: Why SPD pedals?
« on: August 12, 2009, 08:33:21 pm »
That's because they're used so much on mountain bikes.  They're not used as much on road bikes, but I don't know which type is most common on road bikes.  There are too many.
That's not correct.  SPD pedals aren't used by road racers or by very serious performance riders but they are widely used by fitness, organized ride, charity ride and touring riders.  Go to any large organized ride or supported tour and do a pedal census.  SPDs will be in the majority.

1046
General Discussion / Re: Why SPD pedals?
« on: August 10, 2009, 07:19:11 pm »
Are you asking about SPD as the specific Shimmano clip-less pedal design or "SPD" as a generic for clipless pedals by any of numerous manufacturers?

Shimano's own pedals are reasonably priced, available from nearly any LBS or internet/mailorder dealer, well made, durable, have good entry/exit adjusability, good retention and are easy to find replacement cleats for. 

1047
Gear Talk / Re: For lack of a better title... upgrades
« on: August 08, 2009, 02:50:55 pm »
One thing that stood out immediately, you haven't checked your tire pressure is almost two months?  No wonder the bike feels sluggish.  Bike tires aren't car tires.  Pump them up at least once a week.

1048
Gear Talk / Re: Bike Friday or Bilenky
« on: August 08, 2009, 02:38:37 pm »
My Son-in-Law has a Bike Friday and I have a Co-Motion single with S&S couplers which is pretty much the same as the Bilenky you are interested in. 

The BF is somewhat easier to pack and a unpack, fits into a smaller case and is easier to transport through airports, etc.  It is "different" to ride as the small wheels have their own characteristics.  You do get used to it but it's noticably different from a full size wheel bike. 

The Co-Motion (and the Bilenky) are perfectly "normal" bikes that happen to disassemble for travel.  Once put together, the couplers are completely transparent to the rider and every thing about the bike is conventional.  Packing and unpacking take a bit longer than the BF and the packed bike is in a significantly larger case that can be a bit awkward to handle.   

Trade offs: The Bike Friday is easier to travel with.  The Co-Motion is better to ride.   

1049
South Atlantic / Re: Florida Rides
« on: August 04, 2009, 10:11:27 am »
The Gainesville Cycling Festival is the weekend of October 24 and 25 and is very well organized.  Here is the link:

http://gainesvillecyclingclub.org/gcf/index.html

I rode the "Horse Farm Hundred" a few years ago and it was a great ride.

1050
Gear Talk / Re: cannondale
« on: August 03, 2009, 09:09:38 pm »
As several posters have aluded to, what type of tour are you planing?  Fully self-contained with camping, sleeping and cooking gear?  A credit card tour and planing to stay in motels and eat in restaurants every day?

For self-contained touring, your bike really isn't suited and the cost of modifying it to be even marginally effective (stronger wheels, larger tires, more suitable gearing, etc.)  will be the majority of the cost of buying a really proper touring bike.  A trailer will sort-of work but your bike really isn't intended for that use.

For a credit card tour, have at it.  You will only need a light rack, small panniers and a decent credit line.  Your Cannondale will do fine for that.

Pages: 1 ... 68 69 [70] 71 72 ... 103