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Messages - dkoloko

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46
Gear Talk / Re: Touring crankset
« on: June 24, 2013, 01:39:43 pm »
On a compact triple, aluminum generally is not strong enough for the small chain ring. 

I don't know why should be more a factor with compact triple than with any other triple, but my thousands of miles experience touring with aluminum small chainring says strength is not a question. I suspect most who opt for steel instead of aluminum for small chainring do it for anticipated less tooth wear than for perceived strength.

47
Gear Talk / Re: Touring crankset
« on: June 23, 2013, 10:06:44 am »
The TA chainrings are nice, but you won't need anything that fancy, as the bar end shifter will shift anything. I have the Sugino cranks and they are perfect for touring. If you go that route, just watch which model crank you get, the lower end one has heavy steel chainrings.

While I choose alu chainrings, don't go overboard with concern with "heavy"; you're talking about a couple ounces. Some mountain bike/touring cranksets have just two out of the three rings steel. Some prefer steel over alu for inner ring.

48
Gear Talk / Re: new to bike touring
« on: June 23, 2013, 10:00:43 am »
All Ortlieb bags are waterproof. The roll tops can be dunked, the others keep out rain but can't be dunked.

Surly racks lack triangulation.

Sierra Clip Flashlight is a very old design. If that is what you have, go for it. If buying new, I'd consider other designs.

49
Gear Talk / Re: Touring crankset
« on: June 22, 2013, 10:36:27 am »
The most cost sensible thing for you to do is swap your inner chainring for a 24 tooth chainwheel. If you change cranks, then you might as well go for a touring or mountain bike cranks that accommodate chainrings as low as 22 teeth. You could lower the large and middle chainrings you have; I wouldn't; not worth it. Chainline has little to do with size chainrings.

50
Routes / Re: Going To The Sun Road...after 4 PM
« on: June 20, 2013, 03:28:27 pm »
I would still like to know if anyone actually rode up after 4. Thanks all.
Yes.

51
Routes / Re: Going To The Sun Road...after 4 PM
« on: June 20, 2013, 08:04:44 am »
Depends somewhat on whether you are starting after 4PM, or whether you will be on the climb, finishing after 4PM. If the latter, no problem. If the former, if you see three or more motor vehicles piling up behind, get off the road and let them pass, same as you should do on any road.

52
Gear Talk / Re: stability
« on: June 17, 2013, 11:40:48 am »
Post back if you still have stability problems on a calm wind day. If so, then something else is going on and we should discuss further.

Good thought.

53
Gear Talk / Re: stability
« on: June 12, 2013, 07:25:15 pm »
Need more information on what concerns you had as to "stability" on descents. Bike shaking? what? Bike, itself, as differentiated from tires, no problem? Headset correctly adjusted?

54
Gear Talk / Re: B-17 with Aerotech Bibs
« on: May 29, 2013, 02:10:11 pm »

On my other bikes, I use Selle Italia Max Flight saddles; the Sojourn came with a B-17.  I followed the directions on using Proofide to the T.

Lo and behold, when I wear my Aerotech bibs, I get a nasty abrasion in the perineal area.  I know the the Brooks takes time to break in and this doesn't happen on the Max Flight saddles which has a huge relief cut-out.  I wasn't sure if this was a need for the leather to soften around the 3 holes in the center of the B-17 or what.

Is this the result of the B-17 not being broken in yet or is it due to the seam running down the center of the shorts, under the chamois?  I do not have an sit bone pain from, thigh rubbing etc.  I have half a mind to swap saddles since I know the Selle Italia works for me and started to experiment with shorts could get expensive...

I have experience with problem.

You say, "when I wear my Aerotech bibs";  change bibs.

If abrasion is more on one side, try slightly offsetting saddle.

Try slight offset from horizontal.

Use ointment, such as Bag Balm. Use hydrocortisone; available without prescription.

Swap for B-17 Narrow.

Have you toured with the Selle Italia? May feel different after many days.

55
Trek has produced the 520 for years. Comments have been weak rear rack and not low enough gearing.

Not low enough gearing on the Trek 520?  Bizarre.  It comes from the factory with 26x32 low gear.  Fairly low. 

I agree the stock gears are "fairly low", but criticizing the reporting that the gearing is not low enough is "bizarre" is overly strong. See below,

"The one upgrade I have always thought about is lower crank gears. The stock gear ratio of 48/36/26 is a little high if you are using the bike to carry heavier loads on longer trips with mountains."

http://bicycletouringpro.com/blog/trek-520-touring-bicycle-review/

I  especially agree for a small woman.

56
I do not own either bike, but have looked into both. Trek has produced the 520 for years. Comments have been weak rear rack and not low enough gearing. I am turned off by the Kona by the high front rack braze-ons. Front rack bags should be centered on front axle for maximum stability. The difference in weight between the two should be negligible.

57
Routes / Re: Across North America
« on: May 07, 2013, 07:00:55 pm »
If you want to bypass all the issues associated getting out of NYC/N. Jersey by bike, you can take Metro North from Grand Central Terminal all the way to Pougkeepsie, which is on Bike Route 9. Bikes are permitted at certain times provided you buy a one-time permit for $5:

http://www.mta.info/mnr/html/getaways/bikerule.htm

Rt 9, Poughkeepsie, is a major highway with heavy traffic. In general, west side of Hudson River is less trafficked.

58
Routes / Re: Across North America
« on: May 07, 2013, 01:09:01 pm »

This is the route I am thinking of at the moment:
- from New York to Albany (read below)
- from Albany to Buffalo following the Erie Canal (NY State Canalway Trail)


If you get to Buffalo you might as well ride to Niagara Falls, CAN.

[/quote]

I would certainly appreciate an alternate route to State Bike Route 9.
And is there a store in NYC where I can find the ACA or other bicycle maps?

[/quote]

If you can't maps airmailed to you in time, order them delivered somewhere you could pick them up in USA. You can have them sent to General Delivery, any USA Post Office. Suggestion: Mark, "Hold for touring bicyclist". Ask, NYC, most bicycle friendly way ride to Newburgh. Email me off list for directions from there.

59
Routes / Re: Across North America
« on: May 07, 2013, 10:00:03 am »

60
Routes / Re: Across North America
« on: May 07, 2013, 09:56:34 am »

About the ACA Northern Tier: if possible we would like to add more of Canada. So the route we are currently considering is as follows:
- leaving New York City with the NY State Bike Route 9 to Poughkeepsie, NY (85 miles)
- join the ACA Atlantic Coast to Bar Harbor, ME (542 miles)
- start the ACA Northern Tier and follow it until Ticonderoga, NY (401.5 miles)
  (or maybe as an alternative route take the ACA Green Mountains Loop from North Haverhill, NH to Port Kent, NY)
- from there rejoin the NY State Bike Route 9 to Rouses Point on the New York - Quebec border (92 miles)


I've bicycled from New York, where I live, to Bar Harbor, ME, picking up the Atlantic Coast Route. I have also ridden the Norther Tier. I would not do as you plan. You'll be repeating the section in New England where both routes are the same.

I  would avoid Route 9 in New York if you can. It is a very busy road. I would not follow closely NY State Bike Routes. They use too much busy roads.

If you go off and on the Northern Tier, consider including the highlights, Erie Canal bike path in New York, Niagara Falls, Canada (Falls are also in New York, but not as spectacular), Going to the Sun Road, Glacier National Park, Montana, crossing the Continental Divide.

When your plans are more definitive I can give more help bicycling in New York.

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