Recent Posts

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Routes / Re: East Coast Greenway or Atlantic Route
« Last post by BrianW on Today at 08:26:53 am »
I believe true e-bikes, ones where you have to pedal rather than just power along without input, are considered bikes just about everywhere and are allowed on trails, at least on any trail the ECG would use.
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General Discussion / Re: How to transport bike box?
« Last post by staehpj1 on Today at 07:08:32 am »
My preference is to take my bike on the plane with me (on Frontier or Southwest), assemble it in the airport and ride out the door. On the way home, it depends on whether I have a friend with a car who can drive me to a bike shop to get a box, and then the airport. If I do, I'll bring it home the same way. Otherwise I'll ride to a bike shop, have them do the pack and ship, and take public transportation to the airport.
That is my preferred way to get the bike to the start of the tour.

On the way home I have generally found it easier to just drop it at a bike shop and let them pack and ship it like you do as your second option.  That has always cost me around $100 including packing and shipping.  I figure it is worth it at the end of the tour to be able to just drop it off and forget it rather than deal with boxing a bike in a strange city and then getting it to the airport.

The bike shops seem to get a better price on the shipping than I would if dealing directly with the shipper, so some of their packing charge is offset by that.\

BTW, I avoid going to a UPS store and having them ship.  Both times I did that the price was crazy high despite it being the same size and weight as when I paid way less via a bike shop.

I think that since I moved to Florida it may be a little more expensive, because when we shipped our  bikes home from Reno my bike was ~$100 to Baltimore and my daughter's was ~$125 to Tallahassee. That was with same size boxes and about the same weight (actually her's was slightly lighter).
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General Discussion / Re: How to transport bike box?
« Last post by John Nelson on Today at 06:09:14 am »
My preference is to take my bike on the plane with me (on Frontier or Southwest), assemble it in the airport and ride out the door. On the way home, it depends on whether I have a friend with a car who can drive me to a bike shop to get a box, and then the airport. If I do, I'll bring it home the same way. Otherwise I'll ride to a bike shop, have them do the pack and ship, and take public transportation to the airport.
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General Discussion / Re: Lions and tigers and bears oh my!!!
« Last post by Joyride on December 08, 2016, 09:25:10 pm »
Good Stuff Here!
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General Discussion / Re: How to transport bike box?
« Last post by Bclayden on December 08, 2016, 07:22:58 pm »
Some good advice above. I'm often challenged with this sort of thing and have had much luck with cardboard bike boxes and shipping via BikeFlights. No bad experiences so far.

I always begin my touring rides at a hotel near the airport so I ship to the hotel.

What I've found works best for me is packing the bike up myself at home then shipping the bike (via BikeFlights and FedEx Ground) to the hotel at the start of the ride to get there a few days ahead of me. Marriott at least has always been accommodating with this sort of thing. Not sure about other brands. This requires self-assembly after unpacking but if you're up to that then you won't have to coordinate your arrival during bike shop business hours and it will save some $.

If you're cool with some dissembly/re-assembly there are some good YouTube vids showing how to pack a bike properly for shipping. There's more to it than simply throwing the bike into the box but it isn't difficult.

At the other end of the journey I have found it best and easiest to end at a bike shop who can pack and ship the bike for me and I make the BikeFlight arrangements and print shipping label for them (at the hotel) so I'm sure it's done right.

I've never tried to check bike as luggage on the airlines but have heard TSA has been known to pull the bike out of the box and not repack properly. I have avoided checking via airline.
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Pacific Northwest / Re: Walla Walla, WA on the Lewis & Clark Trail
« Last post by AKJeff on December 08, 2016, 03:45:57 pm »
Jennifer,
You bring up an interesting choice, good roads for cyclist or available services.  Most of the route I suggested follows streets that have marked bike lanes or are low traffic.  Local riders avoid Rose St due to a lack of bike lanes and high traffic count.  Services are abundant as you might expect in a downtown area.  Wallula Ave does have the last convenience stores until Touchet, WA, another 15 miles to the west.  As far as services along my suggested route, once you pass the traffic circle at Myra Rd. there are no services except wine tasting rooms until Touchet, WA, however there are separate bike paths and once they end the roads are low traffic with good to excellent shoulders all the way to where Old US 12 Hwy and US 12 Hwy meet.   I often stop at one of these for a friendly chat/taste and to refill my water bottles.  ;) US Hwy 12 is the main artery for all traffic west of Walla Walla, but has good shoulders. I would also mention after Touchet, WA there are no services available until a rider reaches Umitilla, OR. 40 miles away on Map 101.  Pierce's Green Valley RV and Campground mentioned on Map 100 has no store. 

Yes, of course you are welcome to use my RwGPS link.  As I mentioned the city of Walla Walla was just given the bronze level Bicycle Friendly Community award from the League of American Bicyclist.  We are proud of our town.  I will send a copy of the latest Walla Walla Valley Bike Map for your collection.  And if you ever find yourself riding the Lewis & Clark through Walla Walla look me up. 

The photo I have attached is on the Lewis & Clark Bicycle Trail, Sec 7, Map 100, Detail A

Jeffrey 'AKJeff' Fritts
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General Discussion / Re: How to transport bike box?
« Last post by zzzz on December 08, 2016, 02:16:25 pm »
Because I should not assume people can read my mind...

The larger point I was getting at was if you want someone to do you a favor,in this case hold on to my bike box for 4 weeks and then work with me when its time to get it picked up by printing out the shipping ticket etc, it's good to develop a business relationship w them. I do this by becoming a customer when they put the bike back together for me or when they take it apart for shipping home. OP asked how other people handle it, this is how I do it.

I also had in mind but did not comment on in my post that the OP is from Hawaii which has to make shipping cost more.

I had forgotten that REI provides that service, that's a great way to go for towns w an REI. And I see there is a REI in Eugene.
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General Discussion / Re: Lions and tigers and bears oh my!!!
« Last post by indyfabz on December 08, 2016, 01:31:46 pm »
Forgot about bison. Give them a wide berth. This was in Custer Sate Park in SD, but I encountered even worse between W. Yellowstone and Madison Junction. There were a couple lounging in the roadway.
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General Discussion / Re: How to transport bike box?
« Last post by indyfabz on December 08, 2016, 01:22:39 pm »
What does get expensive is the way I do it and described. Shipping your bike to a shop ($150 as I carry more insurance than you do), having the shop put it together (usually $75), if the shop hangs on to the box I normally give them $50 for their trouble, shipping the empty bike box to the new shop ($50), having the shop at the destination take apart my bike and pack it as the box will regularly arrive after I do and in anyway I usually have them clean it after the big trip so thats $75-100, and then ship it home is another $150.


Don't see where the OP was suggesting all that.

BTW...If you ever start in Missoula, check out REI. $40 to reassemble and tune. $40 to pack for shipping. $0 for holding on to your box. Conveniently located 3 miles from the airport and a 5 min. walk from the KOA. Used them twice in the last two years.
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Canada / Re: Bike transport by train
« Last post by jcostanz on December 08, 2016, 11:40:57 am »
I did a trip using Via rail this past summer with a recumbent trike.  It involved taking the train from Toronto to Quebec city(actually Saite-Foy).  It had a train change in Montreal.  I did have to use a train with baggage car and train stations with Checked Baggage service.  In Montreal I didn't have to deal with the bike or checked bags during the layover.  The time it took on the train was near what it would of taken to drive and I didn't need to rent a car/U-haul to transport the trike one way as I rode the bike back home.  Cost was less than rental/drive even with business class from Toronto to Montreal, only economy class or sleeper class avail from Montreal to Quebec City on trains with baggage cars.  I am looking at using the train for next years trip, I just have to figure out where to go.

Jeff
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