Recent Posts

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Gear Talk / Re: Getting bike and gear to start of tour
« Last post by paddleboy17 on Today at 12:19:35 pm »
Just a warning about Amtrak...I've used it twice, once across the country and once up the west coast from LA to Seattle.  Both experiences were disasters. Filthy conditions, WAY late on arrival, unfriendly and uninformed staff.  Etc.  I'll never use them again.  It sounds like others have had much better experiences, so maybe I just hit the wrong train two out of two times.

A few years back, I did the Willamette Valley from one end to the other, and I needed to get to Portland from Eugene.  Amtrak has a train going through there with roll on/off service, but availability and schedules did not work out for me.  Amtrak also has a bus line going through there, with a bike option.  I got one cargo bay to transport my bike and gear.  The staff on both ends were wonderful.  I was personally met in Portland by the station master, who made sure I had a safe route out of Portland. 
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Gear Talk / Re: Getting bike and gear to start of tour
« Last post by johnsondasw on Today at 11:38:25 am »
Yes,  on the Calif to WA route, we had to wait on a side track for a couple of hours for a southbound train to pass. They have allowed to rail infrastructure to deteriorate to the point that there was only one track that way.  Too bad--rail travel would be a good way to combat climate change. 
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Gear Talk / Re: Getting bike and gear to start of tour
« Last post by John Nelson on Today at 11:37:07 am »
The Amtrak web site allows you to check actual arrival times for a station and route for the past week. I suggest you monitor that for a while to get an idea of the range of possibilities. When I went to Chicago on the California Zephyr last summer, I noted that the train typically arrived anywhere from 1 hour to 15 hours late. Armed with that knowledge, it allowed me to plan what I would do if I arrived at 3 in the morning. But, as mentioned, it depends on the route and time of year. I note that right now the California Zephyr has a pretty good track record for the past week. Long-haul passenger service takes a back seat to freight, and many factors are hard to predict and outside of Amtrak's control.

On a positive note, Amtrak is almost certain to get your bike there without damage. Unlike air and bus travel, your bike travels upright with no other stuff stacked on top of it.
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Gear Talk / Re: Getting bike and gear to start of tour
« Last post by indyfabz on Today at 09:47:45 am »
For a variety of reasons, some Amtrak routes are better than others. From an on time perspective, routes that use lines that are heavily congested with freight traffic (e.g., the Capitol Limited, which is popular with GAP riders) tend to have worse on time records, but not always. Necessary maintenance work can also affect on time performance.

A few weeks ago I rode the Vermonter with my bike from Philly to Brattleboro, VT. The Vermonter has roll-on bike service. The staff at the station was very helpful. The woman at the information desk told me to ask a red cap when I needed to report for the elevator ride down to the platform. The red cap was pleasant in letting me know, and everything went smoothly. Before my stop, the conductor let me know which doors would be used to detrain. The train arrived a few minutes early. The services uses lines with little or no freight traffic, some of which are dispatched by Amtrak and commuter agencies, so I should have been more hopeful this would happen then I was.
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Gear Talk / Re: Getting bike and gear to start of tour
« Last post by johnsondasw on Today at 12:19:43 am »
Just a warning about Amtrak...I've used it twice, once across the country and once up the west coast from LA to Seattle.  Both experiences were disasters. Filthy conditions, WAY late on arrival, unfriendly and uninformed staff.  Etc.  I'll never use them again.  It sounds like others have had much better experiences, so maybe I just hit the wrong train two out of two times. 
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Classifieds / FS: 57cm. Trek 520 Disc - upgrades - murdered out
« Last post by radioinactiv on September 26, 2016, 08:49:21 pm »
Up for sale is a my Trek 520 Disc. - all black with non-machined sidewalls and black levers
    • 57cm. Chromoly Frame
      27 speed Shimano Deore with Bar End Shifters
      Bontrager Fenders
      Bontrager Rear Rack [NOT PICTURED]
      Hayes Mechanical Disc Brakes
      Thomson Elite Seatpost
       
    This bike is practically brand new. I've ridden the bike about 60 miles.
    For more detailed pictures please message me or email me.
    Asking $1300
    will ship at expense of buyer
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Gear Talk / Re: Getting bike and gear to start of tour
« Last post by dkoloko on September 26, 2016, 06:40:45 pm »

I don't know what happens if a Greyhound staffer flops the box on its side and pile crap on top of it. 


In my experience, it's what they do.
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Routes / Road 395 south in USA?
« Last post by heravanwillick on September 26, 2016, 05:33:17 pm »
Hi!

I'm on a long bicycle tour, currently heading to Jasper - Banff and then into the States.

Since november/december will be too cold for the Great Divide or the Cascades and the Pacific Coast will be very wet,
someone recommended riding down the 395.

I'm very curious to hear if anyone here has experience with that road or any thoughts about that???

Hope to hear from you!

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Gear Talk / Re: Getting bike and gear to start of tour
« Last post by paddleboy17 on September 26, 2016, 03:16:40 pm »

I have always thought Greyhound Freight was interesting.  They ship from one Greyhound bus depot to another bus depot.  It has been a while, but Greyhound was pretty flexible on box size--it just has to be low enough to fit in a cargo hold.


Just because it is a Greyhound bus station don't count on it being a station that will accept or receive a bike, and if does one, don't count on it doing the other; my experience.

From Greyhound's point of view, the bike box is just freight.  You of course need a box, and I don't know what happens if a Greyhound staffer flops the box on its side and pile crap on top of it.  I think you have to factor in extra time in case the box has to switch buses too.  I got the impression that freight goes stand by, but there is usually room.

The last time I looked into this, I was going from Detroit to Buffalo, with a bus change in Pittsburgh.  Like I said, it is interesting...
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Gear Talk / Re: Getting bike and gear to start of tour
« Last post by dkoloko on September 26, 2016, 03:02:59 pm »

I have always thought Greyhound Freight was interesting.  They ship from one Greyhound bus depot to another bus depot.  It has been a while, but Greyhound was pretty flexible on box size--it just has to be low enough to fit in a cargo hold.


Just because it is a Greyhound bus station don't count on it being a station that will accept or receive a bike, and if does one, don't count on it doing the other; my experience.
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