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Routes / Anyone ride on 101 along Lake Crescent in Washington
« Last post by ellsdemon on September 02, 2015, 06:35:35 pm »
I'm about to ride across the state of Washington leaving from La Push and I was planning on riding all the way to Lake Crescent and then use the CDT trail to go to the north. But CDT is closed for construction so my option is to stay on 101 on the south side of the lake or take Rte. 112. Has anyone done 101 and is it dangerous? I've driven on it several times and it's a tight one even in a car.
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Urban Cycling / Advice for New York city
« Last post by Stringcat on September 02, 2015, 06:03:44 pm »
Hi. I'm finishing a coast to coast ride next week (probably on Tuesday 8 September) in New York. Does anyone have any good tips/suggestions/routes for riding into the city, ending up in Manhattan?

In particular, is there a good way to come through the suburbs from the west or north west?

Many thanks
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Gear Talk / Re: Recommended Temperature Rating for Sleeping Bag on TransAm
« Last post by henry_jackson on September 02, 2015, 12:29:31 pm »
I'm new to bike travel but I've worked full time in outdoor education and adventure travel for the last five years.

WAY MORE IMPORTANT than your bag is your SLEEPING PAD. The bag protects against heat lost through Radiation but the sleeping pad protects against heat loss through Conduction.

Also, KEEP IT CLEAN. Dirt and sweat prevents the fabric and insulation from performing to it's full capacity.

As someone who sleeps very cold, here's my beliefs....
Sleeping pads must be inflatable and have a very high "R value" usually achieved through insulation within the air chambers.
I have 3 bags. 45 degree for warm weather, 0 degree for "this sucks" weather, 20 degree for everything else. I use the same pad year round.
Quilts are a miserable experience made worse by trying to sleep in layers of sweat-smelling clothing.
A sleeping bag (with a good pad) is comfortably warm 10-15 degrees higher than the rating.
Synthetic insulation works well in 45-50 degree bags only!
Any bag for colder temps has to be hydrophobic treated down insulation stored in a Sea to Summit evac compression dry sack for added protection.
Any bag heavier than 2lbs is out of the question.
Snag free zippers are a lie.
Inserts and liners keep the bag clean (major plus!) but do nothing for added warmth.



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Routes / Re: Late summer route options Colorado to West
« Last post by Venchka on September 02, 2015, 12:13:56 pm »
Not sure how fast you're riding (miles per day), so I'll use my time and guesstimate you'll hit Idaho in a month.  It might take another couple weeks to get to central Oregon.

By the first of October, there's a decent chance the cooler weather and some light showers will have suppressed the worst of the wild fires in the northwest, should you choose to take the TransAm.

OTOH, NPS campgrounds start closing down this week in Yellowstone.  It's an easy two or three day trip from Moran Junction to West Yellowstone, and it's all through national parks.  There's a Forest Service campground just east of Moran Junction if Jackson Lake is closed.  I think the next campground on route is at West Thumb, followed by Old Faithful.  What's the closure schedule for those?

Yellowstone facilities closing schedule:

http://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/ocd_locale.htm

The South Entrance remains open until early November. Madison CG is open until October 18. A very long day from the South Entrance.

Grand Teton NP campground closing schedule:

http://www.nps.gov/grte/planyourvisit/camping.htm

Lizard Creek (preferred) closes mid-September & Colter Bay closes late September. I couldn't find any dates for Flagg Ranch/Headwaters Lodge which I would say is the option of last resort.

So, the Tans-Am sounds like it is doable if you get through Yellowstone in the next 2-3 weeks. The Western Express would be most interesting.
Or, you could bypass Teton-Yellowstone parks altogether by heading west from Jackson, WY and then going north through Idaho and picking up the Trans-Am west of West Yellowstone, MT. The back roads just west of Grand Teton NP are lovely. Been there. Liked it.

Wayne


Wayne
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Routes / Re: Late summer route options Colorado to West
« Last post by Pat Lamb on September 02, 2015, 11:35:20 am »
Not sure how fast you're riding (miles per day), so I'll use my time and guesstimate you'll hit Idaho in a month.  It might take another couple weeks to get to central Oregon.

By the first of October, there's a decent chance the cooler weather and some light showers will have suppressed the worst of the wild fires in the northwest, should you choose to take the TransAm.

OTOH, NPS campgrounds start closing down this week in Yellowstone.  It's an easy two or three day trip from Moran Junction to West Yellowstone, and it's all through national parks.  There's a Forest Service campground just east of Moran Junction if Jackson Lake is closed.  I think the next campground on route is at West Thumb, followed by Old Faithful.  What's the closure schedule for those?
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Here is a detour option from Featherville to Hailey, which is directly south of Ketchum (and shown on the IDHS Main Route map):
https://goo.gl/maps/GLRlO

From Featherville, the route departs the Main Route and heads south to Pine on the Pine-Featherville Rd (shown on the map). From Pine, the route heads further south and east but without ever having to ride US 20. The route will eventually hook into Croy Creek Rd. and into Hailey (also on the map), where you could either ride Highway 75 or the Wood River Trail north into Ketchum. Services are available in the town of Fairfield at about the halfway point. And the distance is similar to the Main Route.

If you choose to ride this detour, do so at your own discretion. Check beforehand with IDOT and Sawtooth NF for current condition of the roads.

Nathan Taylor
ACA Cartographer
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Routes / Re: Late summer route options Colorado to West
« Last post by staehpj1 on September 02, 2015, 08:02:33 am »
If it was my trip I think I'd base the choice on personal preference and where the smoke wouldn't be too bad and not worry too much about the snow.  I'd try to make fairly good time and be prepared to possibly take a day or two off to wait for snow to melt.

I don't know what the smoke situation is likely to be at the times you would be passing through the various areas, maybe someone else can comment on that.

When/where it is likely to be cold, I'd try to avoid camping at higher elevations, staying partway down the mountain.

I hate hot weather and had plenty of it on my TA.  I think that fall on the TA would actually be nicer than a hot Summer tour there.

McKenzie Pass was mentioned...  I agree that it is likely to be open unless there is an especially early closing this year, but if it were to close Santiam Pass is plowed year round and would be a fall back option.
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Routes / Re: Late summer route options Colorado to West
« Last post by Patco on September 01, 2015, 09:16:55 pm »
McKenzie Pass 'generally' closes early November, although there have been some earlier closings, but those are usually late October. Early to mid October? I would take the bet that the pass will be open. If it isn't, then you can always take the Santiam Pass route.
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Routes / Re: Late summer route options Colorado to West
« Last post by aggie on September 01, 2015, 07:10:37 pm »
It would be unusual to encounter snow in Nevada at the time you would be going through.  The weather should be just about perfect.  Cool in the morning and nice in the afternoon.  Traveled Hwy 50 many times in Sept and never encountered snow.  Cold and wet yes but no snow.  Make sure to carry enough water to make it between towns between Baker and Middle Gate.  There isn't any available except in towns.   
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Routes / Re: Late summer route options Colorado to West
« Last post by Venchka on September 01, 2015, 06:42:56 pm »
I haven't encountered snow in southern Colorado as late as the second week in October.
Unless you are going to Pueblo for a specific reason, from La Junta angle SW to Walsenburg, CO and then to Alamosa, Pagosa Springs, Durango & the Western Express. If you have time, visit Great Sand Dunes NP northeast of Alamosa.
Wolf Creek Pass is the highest pass you'll encounter before Durango. Early September will not be a problem. Not saying you won't see any snow, but this time of year it's usually light & gone quickly. Keeps the bugs away!
Southern Utah should be fine through October. No way you'll encounter 10 feet of snow. Again, snow in the fall doesn't stay on the ground long.
Good luck!

Wayne
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