Recent Posts

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21
General Discussion / Re: Busiest ACA or other trail intersection?
« Last post by kukula on August 29, 2014, 12:51:43 am »
I too dream of opening a little hostel / cafe / bike shop / bookstore at some nice bike route intersection. And also of riding the Natchez Trace.

How about where the Natchez Trace crosses MS route 25, near Tishomingo. The Underground Railroad route splits/joins there, I think. Looks like there is an ATV shop there.

Yeah, ride through all these places first, then you can make a decision where to plunge in. What fun!
22
General Discussion / Re: Riding on the US Interstates
« Last post by adventurepdx on August 28, 2014, 11:42:36 pm »
Have a look at this page in Crazyguyonabike. http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/2616
Washington most certainly does not allow cyclists on  the interstates except where an alternative  route does not exist

The whole "except where an alternative route does not exist" isn't really true anymore, especially in Washington State. This idea may have lifted prohibitions on bicycles on Interstates way back when. But when you look at the actual prohibitions on cycling on Interstates and other highways in Washington, you see that you can ride on I-5 or I-90 for great distances. With a few exceptions, the prohibitions are in urban areas where there are many on/off ramps and sometimes stretches of highway with no shoulder.

Take a look:
http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/bike/closed.htm
https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=101129574208460913813.00046426e0691fbccc526&ll=47.256864,-120.574951&spn=4.600584,9.887695&z=7&dg=feature


For example, you can ride the shoulder of I-5 for the approx. 100 miles between Olympia and Salmon Creek (outside of Vancouver, Wash.) without having to get off the Interstate. And I know for sure there are "alternative routes" that parallel I-5 here (Old 99, for one), yet you can still legally ride the shoulder of I-5 if you want.
23
General Discussion / Re: Sour clothing - after washing!
« Last post by bogiesan on August 28, 2014, 11:15:00 pm »
I'm beginning to think that the recommendation for washing out at the end of the day and air drying is probably the best solution.  No more plastic bags loaded with unwashed clothes for me.

Oh, yeah, simple wins almost every time. Careful what you use as a soap and how much you use; more is rarely better. A few drop of Bronner's peppermint can do a whole day's laundry.

I don't do self-supported tours so I usually get into the shower truck wearing my bike clothes. If there's a line for the showers, I can soap my jersey and shorts and rinse them in about 90 seconds, strip them off and do another, more complete cycle on skin and hair under 2 minutes. I take much more time if there's no one waiting for a stall.

I have a mesh bag for the wet clothes. I stand where I won't spatter anyone and whirl the bag over my head. This spins out a lot of water. I roll up the wet clothes in a towel and wring it, expelling more water. the towel gives you more leverage. I have some line and a few clothespins. On Cycle Oregon we can have three days of stupid hard and horizontal rain and nothing gets dry.
24
General Discussion / Re: Quick fixes for cyclist's palsy?
« Last post by bogiesan on August 28, 2014, 11:00:08 pm »
Get a recumbent.

The various forms of nerve stress and possible damage are not easily diagnosed, as your research indicated. Far too many individual factors and there's no way for a doctor to see what's going on with your nerves. However, a good sports-specific MD can assess your bike and your riding position and, based on your symptoms, make a pretty good guess about what might prevent it next time.

while I know people who are enamored of bike fit shops, those proprietors usually are working on standard forms. They' generally not physical therapists.

That's where I'd start but the guy I see is a marathoner and tri. He understands bikes. He even understands my recumbent.

25
General Discussion / Re: importance of componentry
« Last post by DaveB on August 28, 2014, 09:54:53 pm »
Quote
Also, those "Dura Ace" barends are intended more for time trial bikes aero bars than for touring use.  Again, Dura Ace isn't bought by tourists.

We have three touring bikes in the house with Shimano SL-BS77 Dura-Ace 7700 Bar End Shifters (9 speed), one of which just got upgraded to 9 speed this year.  Bruce Gordon used them on his bikes for years, I don't know what he is using currently.  The shifters work very well on our touring bikes (22-32-44, 11-32).  I don't have any experience with the 10 speed version.
You are not the main market for Shimano's 9 and 10-speed barends.  Yes they work fine and are suitable for your use but if it had to rely on the touring market, Shimano would have dropped them long ago.
26
General Discussion / Re: importance of componentry
« Last post by tsteven4 on August 28, 2014, 08:17:00 pm »
Quote
Also, those "Dura Ace" barends are intended more for time trial bikes aero bars than for touring use.  Again, Dura Ace isn't bought by tourists.

We have three touring bikes in the house with Shimano SL-BS77 Dura-Ace 7700 Bar End Shifters (9 speed), one of which just got upgraded to 9 speed this year.  Bruce Gordon used them on his bikes for years, I don't know what he is using currently.  The shifters work very well on our touring bikes (22-32-44, 11-32).  I don't have any experience with the 10 speed version.
27
General Discussion / Quick fixes for cyclist's palsy?
« Last post by Jblizard on August 28, 2014, 08:06:21 pm »
I just finished my cross-country tour (also my first tour)! Hurray, feeling accomplished, excited to do more touring in the future, but I'm having hand issues.

On the tour, my left hand pinky and ring finger went numb, and stayed numb for the duration of the tour. I did some research online and found out that people call this cyclist's palsy and that it usually goes away, but sometimes takes weeks to fully fade. This is scaring me, because I study classical guitar at a conservatory, and I need my hands when I go back to school.

Right now, I'm trying to figure out if there are any ways to speed up the recovery and get my fingers back to fully functional. I'm currently wearing a sling, trying not to use the hand/arm unless absolutely necessary, and trying to stretch it regularly, but I don't know if it's better to rest it or try to strengthen the muscles by using it.

As for future tours, I know that I need better padding on my bars, as well as to raise my bars so my hands are above my pelvis, but if anyone has other advice for preventing numbness in the future, that would also be appreciated. This tour made my certain that I want to do other tours in the future, but I can't risk losing feeling in my hands like this again.

Thanks!
28
Gear Talk / Re: trikes
« Last post by TCS on August 28, 2014, 07:02:40 pm »
Yes, I've seen them as parts getters in industrial plants and for shopping transportation in retirement communities but i've never seen on on the road.  A combination of weight and odd handling and limited cornering ability are major disadvantages.

Click on some of the above links for lightweight racing versions.

Trikes 'oddly handlinng and limitedly cornering' at a rainy world championship a few years back.
29
General Discussion / Riding on the US Interstates
« Last post by rogermcd on August 28, 2014, 06:59:00 pm »
Have a look at this page in Crazyguyonabike. http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/2616

Washington most certainly does not allow cyclists on  the interstates except where an alternative  route does not exist


I still maintain that whether to use the interstate or not should be up to the cyclist and not a bureaucrat.
30
General Discussion / Re: importance of componentry
« Last post by DaveB on August 28, 2014, 05:44:28 pm »
Unfortunately Shimano no longer makes triples, but they do make Dura Ace bar end (showing Dura Ace is not only race componentry). So to me that suggests the the newer gear with thinner chains was not up to touring (hopefully just yet), and they will some day. Maybe just a pipe dream, but I may wish to buy another touring bike and sure would like Dura Ace.
Shimano does indeed make triples, they just don't make them in groups their experiences tells them don't sell to tourists.   The 105 FC-5703 is a triple and has a 74 mm BCD for the granny ring so it will take down to a 24T chainring and several of their MTB and Trekking cranks are available as suitable triples.  Also, those "Dura Ace" barends are intended more for time trial bikes aero bars than for touring use.  Again, Dura Ace isn't bought by tourists.

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