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General Discussion / Re: Bicycle tools for a cross country ride
« Last post by staehpj1 on July 27, 2015, 10:18:12 am »
The tools and spare parts you carry will depend on the remoteness and length of the journey. I carry two spare tires, 5 inner tubes,  and Park tire boots. I got about sixty miles on a new tire and ran over A glass bottle bottom at the bottom of a puddle and cut the tire rim to rim. Also after 3000 miles you'll need new tires.
I am curious where you tour that you feel the need to carry all of that.  Do you tour in some really remote places?

I have only toured on road in the lower 48, but have been in some fairly remote places.  How remote the trip is might make a difference how many spare parts you carry, but I figure that anywhere I have been on tour I wouldn't carry a spare tire let alone two.  I have found that a tire that is so bad that I can't boot it somehow and limp along is exceedingly rare (as in never in my something approaching 60 years of cycling).  In that exceedingly rare case, hitching a ride wouldn't be the end of the world, even on low traffic roads.  I have had to hitch now and then for other reasons as have some of my friends and a wait of less than 20 minutes is typical unless you are on roads where there is only a car every hour or two.  The good news on those is that almost every vehicle will stop for you.

As far as carrying tires because I might need them in 3000 miles I'll pass on that too.  I have had to settle for a different tire than I wanted sometimes, but when replacing tires mid tour I and always been able to find something available.  If not I'd order some to be next day shipped or have some one at home send me some.  It has never come to that though.

As far as tools go my suggestion is to take the tools that fit the stuff on your specific bike.  The list will vary with the bike.  I typically make it a point to do most of the set up and maintenance on my bikes at home with my touring tool set for that bike, that way I know that it works OK before I need to rely on it on a tour.
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General Discussion / Re: Bicycle tools for a cross country ride
« Last post by DaveB on July 27, 2015, 08:05:41 am »
Yes, a master link :)  I had no idea what they were called!  I never had a broken chain on tour, but did once when I borrowed a rusty old bike for a day. Resulted in a 9 mile walk back.  Master links are very cheap and take no space at all. Well worth having just in case!
Remember, master links aren't universal.  They come in a variety of widths to match 7/8, 9, 10 and 11-speed chains and you need to have the one that matches your chain.   
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Classifieds / Re: FS: BOB Yak Trailer + accessories
« Last post by giantjim on July 26, 2015, 11:03:22 pm »
We be going thru on 7/29. However, we will be returning on 8/ 4 or 5, we could stop then. We are traveling in a 40' motor home and towing a car. Not sure what are you are, but traversing neighborhood streets is a bit difficult.
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General Discussion / Re: Bicycle tools for a cross country ride
« Last post by andydaoust on July 26, 2015, 10:18:54 pm »
The tools and spare parts you carry will depend on the remoteness and length of the journey. I carry two spare tires, 5 inner tubes,  and Park tire boots. I got about sixty miles on a new tire and ran over A glass bottle bottom at the bottom of a puddle and cut the tire rim to rim. Also after 3000 miles you'll need new tires. I'm using the continental Cyclocross Speed Cross 700C x 35. They are really light but not as bullet proof as some tires. I prefer to carry a little extra weight on the bike and save rotational weight.

Spare Spokes. I've had to repair and true other people's wheels not mine but I've learned from those experiences that having the ability can save your tour. In order to replace the spokes on the cassette side you need to remove the cassette. The best way is with a J.A. Stein tool. It weighs an ounce and makes removing the cassette freakishly easy.

I learned how to true wheels by trying it and it was in the days without YouTube. It easy once you do it and gives you confidence on the road.

I also suggest replacing your cables before you go, and do it yourself so you can feel confident that you can do it on the road. Carry one each spare.

I also carry a couple of spare cleat screws as I learned that one the hard way.

Go over every screw on your bike and be prepared to tighten them. If you plan on using a multi tool try it on every screw. There's nothing more frustrating than having the right size Allen that can't fit into the area to tighten the screw. I carry a multi tool for the spooke wrench and chain break tools. Then I carry which ever Allen key is needed that I can't fit the multi tool into. An example of something that could rattle loose that wouldn't normally cross your mind, pannier screws. I have Ortlieb panniers that have Torx T-15 screws that loosen up so I carry a separate T-15 key and check the screws every few days.

I might go over board but I like to be independent and some of the places I go don't have a LBS readily available.
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Routes / Re: Great Divide: Tour Divide's 2015 reroute around the Great Basin
« Last post by Venchka on July 26, 2015, 07:18:44 pm »
If not permanent, then an approved alternate. Limited reviews from TD 2015 riders said that Wamsutter had everything one needed and several hours shorter than Rawlins.
Thanks for confirming that the Lodge is still on the route.

Wayne


Sent from somewhere around here.
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Classifieds / FS: Waterford brand Adventure Cycle touring bike $475
« Last post by BillR on July 26, 2015, 05:28:54 pm »
I am in the process of moving to Florida and selling everything.  One thing is my beloved touring bike and accessories.  I am selling it at this low price because I am crunched for time and much prefer local pick up (NW suburb of Chicago, Barrington IL)  It is in very good condition, rides wonderfully, is beautiful purple and needs a good home.  Sized to fit man about 5' 10 1/2" tall  I can be reached by email:  wfr2@comcast.net  or by phone at (239) 676-9087 before July 31 or (847) 304-0637 after July 31 until August 12.  If necessary I will have it boxed and shipped at your expense.
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Routes / Finger lakes loop self-guided
« Last post by jmm6382 on July 26, 2015, 04:38:20 pm »
Planning a trip for next year. I see ACA has a guided trip but no maps for sale for a self-guided trip. Anyone have experience doing this trip self-guided?  Where can I get a map(s)?  Thanks.
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General Discussion / Re: Northern Tier or better idea?
« Last post by adventurepdx on July 26, 2015, 01:17:00 pm »
To the OP, another thing to note if you use the Nestucca River Route:
While counter-intuitive, when you finally get to US 101, you want to turn right, i.e. go north for about 3 miles then turn left on Sandlake Road. The section of US 101 from Tillamook to Pacific City is narrow, shoulderless, and busy. Going the alternate gets you onto quieter, scenic roads.
https://goo.gl/maps/YSrIq
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General Discussion / Re: Northern Tier or better idea?
« Last post by adventurepdx on July 26, 2015, 12:57:28 pm »
Are you saying it takes an hour on light rail to Hillsboro?

Yep.

How easy is it to put a loaded touring bike on the train?

Not hard at all. There are four hooks per low-level car to hang bikes. When I've brought a loaded bike, I've taken off the panniers to get it on the hook. There are also a few open spots that a bike can "lean" against, but these spots are priority for wheelchair/mobility device users.
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General Discussion / Re: Northern Tier or better idea?
« Last post by paulsinbc on July 26, 2015, 12:44:59 pm »
I like touring on gravel so that's more appealing than anything but 5 miles of 10% grade sounds tough for the first day of a tour but alas, still better than a good day at work. 

"But why not stay in Portland and then take the light rail out to Hillsboro? It's just about an hour ride from downtown Portland." 
Are you saying it takes an hour on light rail to Hillsborro?  How easy is it to put a loaded touring bike on the train?
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