Recent Posts

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31
Gear Talk / Re: One Bike to Do It All
« Last post by planeguy5 on February 05, 2016, 01:38:07 am »
I have heard that the Surly Crosscheck is one of the best all-round bikes. I'm in a similar position as you, and am giving it serious thought--especially given its price ($1000).
32
Gear Talk / One Bike to Do It All
« Last post by Saburo on February 04, 2016, 09:12:05 pm »
I have two bikes now: an old specialized allez road bike i use for faster rides and a Rivendell Bleriot that I have used for road tours and even GAP and C&O tours.  I love my Bleriot but its limited clearance  made the muddy C&O and off road rides difficult.  I really need to have one bike now as I've had to downsize the house for a new job.

So the question is: What would you consider to be a great do-it-all bike?  Surly LHT? Surly Troll? Trek 920? Specialized AWOL? Or some other bike?  Funds are limited to what I can sell the current bikes for let's say $1000 to 1500.
33
Gear Talk / Re: How to pack my sleeping bag
« Last post by RussSeaton on February 04, 2016, 08:48:11 pm »
No, a true 20 bag is not overkill even in the summer unless you are staying in the deep south and at low altitude.  I've experienced low 30's temperatures in mid-June in Ohio and high altitude can produce low temperatures any time of year.

Because I have nothing better to do, I decided to look up the temperature in Ohio in June.  I picked Columbus since its in the middle of Ohio.  The average low in Columbus is 61 degrees in June.  Average high in June is 82 degrees.  And the record low in Columbus in June is 35 degrees on June 11, 1972.  Cleveland is in the north of Ohio.  Might be colder up there.  Its coldest temp for June was 31 degrees on June 11, 1972.  Not saying it does not get into the low 30s somewhere in Ohio in June once every 20-30-40-50 years.  It might, maybe, possibly.  But its been 44 years since it was in the low 30s in June in Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio.

http://www.usclimatedata.com/climate/ohio/united-states/3205
https://weather.com/weather/monthly/l/43210

I will repeat my suggestion to the person who posted this thread.  For the Trans Am trail in the summer.  Get a DOWN sleeping bag that is rated for about 40-45 degrees or so.  It will be warm enough for everything except sleeping at the top of mountains.  It will be small and light too.  You can always wear tights and socks and a hat if it gets extra cold.  I assume you will carry some warm clothes along on a cross country bike ride.
34
Gear Talk / Re: How to pack my sleeping bag
« Last post by RussSeaton on February 04, 2016, 08:07:04 pm »
But the question of where most people pack their sleeping bag makes more sense to me if most folks buy more expensive bags that require less space.

Down bags have the advantage of packing/squeezing into a smaller space and lighter weight at a temp rating.  Down bags have the disadvantages of being susceptible to failure if they get wet and being more expensive than synthetic.  Down bags also come in 600 and 800 down so that magnifies the advantages or disadvantages too.  Your choice.  Down or synthetic sleeping bag.

Kind of like frame material.  Contrary to some claims, there are pros and cons of each material.  Pick one.
35
Gear Talk / Re: How to pack my sleeping bag
« Last post by Nyimbo on February 04, 2016, 07:38:18 pm »
I am comfortable with the 20en rating of my bag.  I get cold easily and don't mind sleeping on top of the bag for the warm days.  But the question of where most people pack their sleeping bag makes more sense to me if most folks buy more expensive bags that require less space. 
36
Gear Talk / Re: How to pack my sleeping bag
« Last post by staehpj1 on February 04, 2016, 06:00:18 pm »
In my experience, a 20 degree sleeping bag is overkill.
No, a true 20 bag is not overkill even in the summer unless you are staying in the deep south and at low altitude.  I've experienced low 30's temperatures in mid-June in Ohio and high altitude can  produce low temperatures any time of year.

However, there are 20 degree bags and 20 degree bags with expensive ones being a lot lighter and easier to compress than cheap ones.
A lot depends on the bag, the rider, and how the bag is used.  The TA, the ST (winter), half of the SC, and a bunch of other routes with my 40 F bag.  I have also done some high altitude backpacking with it  I have used it comfortably down to the mid to upper teens F with a layer or two of clothing.  Others who camped right next to me were cold in much warmer bags at times I was comfy.  My point is that blanket statements don't work.  So saying something is or isn't overkill would need to take in a few of the specifics of the bag and the person using it.
37
Gear Talk / Re: How to pack my sleeping bag
« Last post by DaveB on February 04, 2016, 05:51:09 pm »
In my experience, a 20 degree sleeping bag is overkill.
No, a true 20 bag is not overkill even in the summer unless you are staying in the deep south and at low altitude.  I've experienced low 30's temperatures in mid-June in Ohio and high altitude can  produce low temperatures any time of year.

However, there are 20 degree bags and 20 degree bags with expensive ones being a lot lighter and easier to compress than cheap ones.
38
Classifieds / Salsa Fargo medium 2012 or older WANTED
« Last post by littlewalter on February 04, 2016, 02:32:50 pm »
Hi,
I am in the market for a Salsa Fargo, size medium.  I would prefer to purchase just a frameset (frame and fork) but would be interested in a complete bike as well, if that's what you have.
I want an older version, because I prefer the mounting position of the brake caliper on the 2012 and earlier versions.
Please let me know if you have a complete bike or frameset for sale.
Thanks!
-Dan
bluesharp@ comcast.net
I live in the San Francisco Bay Area, but will, of course, pay for shipping for an out-of-my-area purchase.
39
Gear Talk / Re: How to pack my sleeping bag
« Last post by Patco on February 04, 2016, 12:03:08 pm »
I use a waterproof compression bag for my sleeping bag (same that I use when backpacking), and I attach it to the rear shelf. With the compression bag it packs very small, and with the compression bag being waterproof, I have been rained, snowed, and hailed on and my sleeping bag has stayed dry.

Just as an aside, I also use compression bags for my tent and fly. 
40
Gear Talk / Re: How to pack my sleeping bag
« Last post by dkoloko on February 04, 2016, 11:46:05 am »
In my experience, a 20 degree sleeping bag is overkill. I pack my bag in an ordinary stuff bag in a waterproof pannier. If you cannot get your bag inside your pannier, I recommend lashing it to your rack in a dry bag (waterproof seal) or two waterproof stuff sacks, with openings facing opposite. I am not much for garbage bags or other disposable plastic bags, except in an emergency.
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