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General Discussion / Re: Wireless computer on touring bike
« Last post by staehpj1 on October 20, 2014, 06:23:20 am »
You can use either. The panniers will not interfere with the wireless signal. Some people complain that wireless is more subject to interference, but this is a small problem. I use a wired computer for touring, just because it's one less battery to worry about. But that's a very small issue too. I use a wireless computer on my daily bike. Flip a coin.

I agree on all of that except interference being a very small issue.  My two companions on the TA found their wireless ones quite annoying.  The biggest culprit was interference from neon signs when parked in front of stores or diners.  The wireless computers would often register miles while the bikes were parked.  The other issue was that like many other wireless models they needed to be turned on before they started working.  Forgetting to turn them on until down the road a ways offset the mileage registered while sitting still :)

They also got crazy readings sometimes when near power lines, electric fences, and broadcast towers.  They might look down and see a 700 mph reading once in a while.

I gave up on wireless long before I started touring so I have never toured with wireless, but I had the same problems with several different brand name models before giving up on wireless ones.

The total miles traveled were not off by much on the Trans America, but my companions were pretty annoyed by the little differences that made it difficult to keep track of things like how far the next turn was.

One of my TA companions, went into Performance after the Trans America and when the sales guy asked how her tour went and how the gear he sold her worked out, she said "Great except this P.O.S wireless computer you sold me".  His response was "I could have told you that, all the wireless ones have those kind of problems".  He then gave her a refund that was used to purchase a wired model.

My recommendation is that if you use the computer to keep track of your turns throughout the day base on mileage from the start, stick with a wired model.  If you are worried about breaking the wire some of the MTB models have a heavier duty wire.
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General Discussion / Re: Wireless computer on touring bike
« Last post by John Nelson on October 20, 2014, 12:04:11 am »
You can use either. The panniers will not interfere with the wireless signal. Some people complain that wireless is more subject to interference, but this is a small problem. I use a wired computer for touring, just because it's one less battery to worry about. But that's a very small issue too. I use a wireless computer on my daily bike. Flip a coin.
33
General Discussion / Re: Bike Question
« Last post by ozroller on October 19, 2014, 11:27:53 pm »
it really depends on how much gear (weight) you plan to carry on your bike.....that is, how many days is your tour?
If more than a few days and you are going self contained....a touring bike might be a better option.......unless you pull a BOB trailer, as suggested before.
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General Discussion / Wireless computer on touring bike
« Last post by ozroller on October 19, 2014, 11:16:03 pm »
I am looking for computer for new touring bike.....i like wireless, but will the panniers  be in the way and cause bad signal transmission??    Is wired computer preferred, in this case??     Mark
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Routes / Re: Southern Tier, highway 78 Glamis to Palo Verde, Ca
« Last post by Catherine on October 19, 2014, 06:02:07 pm »
Thaks, good suggestion.  I have one partially mounted.  Time to finish the job, it's waitig patiently I a pannier.
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General Discussion / Re: 29er tubeless tires for Great Divide
« Last post by newfydog on October 19, 2014, 02:43:51 pm »
Geax Saguaro, hands down the most reliable, best all round mtb touring tire I've used.

I like slightly worn one on the front because it wears to a nice center ridge.

I have not had a flat with tubeless tires in three years, including the Arizona Trail thornfest.  the goatheads in New Mexico destroyed our tubes.
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Routes / Re: Southern Tier, highway 78 Glamis to Palo Verde, Ca
« Last post by johnsondasw on October 19, 2014, 02:19:01 pm »
I've been on such roads so many times.  I'd suggest getting a mirror if you're not already using one.  On tours there are almost always sections like this., and they are sometimes unavoidable  Without a mirror, I feel so at the mercy of random strangers who are sometimes texting, drunk, eating....you get the idea.  I don't want to be at the absolute mercy of these folks.  I have left the road to avoid cars/trucks coming way to close.
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General Discussion / Re: Bike Question
« Last post by johnsondasw on October 19, 2014, 02:14:10 pm »
I've done self supported touring with a bike "too light" for touring.  I towed a Burley Nomad trailer with a Specialized Roubaix CF frame bike and it worked great.  I had to buy the alternative attachment system, which replaces the stock rear skewer.  It's super easy to get the thing hooked and unhooked. 
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General Discussion / Re: Toe clips? Clipless? None of the above?
« Last post by johnsondasw on October 19, 2014, 02:10:27 pm »
I use regular road biking shoes with Crank Brothers "eggbeater" type pedals.  I love 'em. They are much easier to get out of than the old pedals with straps.  They also stick out above what would be the platform area of most other clipons and therefore don't fill with dirt and mud making it hard to get into.  I've been on rides where my partners' system got too muddy/dirty and they had a heck of a time cleaning them out so they could get clipped in. I have never had that happen.

I definitely like being clipped in and will never go back to the old pedals with straps.  Clipped in, you get much more effective pedaling power, especially if you learn to "circle" with each rotation.  Of course, until one learns how to get out of the clips fast, falls are likely.  I took one very soon after getting my new pedals. But that was 11 years ago. 
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General Discussion / Re: Strange sounds from below
« Last post by johnsondasw on October 19, 2014, 01:59:13 pm »
Do you hear it only when pedaling, or also when coasting? I assume it's a pedaling thing. Over the past 60 years or so I've dealt with many knocking/clicking sounds.  The last time, it was more of a clicking one, that seemed to be around only when pedaling under pressure, not under just "maintenance" pedaling.  Of course, it was a slightly loose pedal.  That does not sound like your deal. I have also had the slightly loose rear skewer deal. I once had a much more pronounced knock and it was in the BB.  I had to tighten the lock ring a little more and it fixed the issue. That was on an old 1970s Nishiki.  Great durable bike that died when my son had it in the back  of a pickup, went around a corner too fast and the bike flew onto the pavement. Hmmm, just how fast to you have to turn to throw a bike out of the back of a pickup?
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