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41
Routes / Re: The 101 south of crescent city
« Last post by lkcavanagh on July 02, 2015, 08:58:25 pm »
Thanks for the reply! we think busses aren't the way to go, but if people chimed in pro bus we were going to consider. We know we are going the "wrong" way, but we had some San Francisco visiting to do, and won't be going north more than another 100 miles or so.

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42
Routes / Re: Pacific Coast Highway on a road bike?
« Last post by staehpj1 on July 02, 2015, 06:41:45 pm »
a stove isn't at all necessary if you're trying to pack light. Personally, the last thing I want to do at camp is spend an hour warming a can of beans, then have to clean up etc, although I've seen plenty of tourers that do it.

I'd agree that you can get by without cooking, and if that is what you prefer that is great, but...
I think you overstate the negatives.  My cooking gear weighs 7.1 ounces in its lightest form so it is possible to go light and still cook.  The beans sound kind of bleak, but I don't think I have resorted to a can of beans more than a very few times and when I did I heated them in the can, so almost no clean up.  For me taking the cooking gear is kind of automatic.
43
Routes / Re: Pacific Coast Highway on a road bike?
« Last post by indyfabz on July 02, 2015, 03:40:42 pm »
So that covers the sleeping arrangements. Then you need to add stove, cookware, fuel, food, water and sundry other camping items.
Weight (and volume) can escalate rapidly.

a stove isn't at all necessary if you're trying to pack light. Personally, the last thing I want to do at camp is spend an hour warming a can of beans, then have to clean up etc, although I've seen plenty of tourers that do it.

I can whip up something like this, munch it down and do clean up in about an hour:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/davez2007/9779778496/in/album-72157635548910265/

Just got back from a non-cooking tour of the Black Hills. It was my first trip of more than three days without cooking gear. I will never do that again unless I know I will be in an area where dine out options can regularly provide broad sources of nutrition as opposed to simply calories.
44
Routes / Re: The 101 south of crescent city
« Last post by John Nelson on July 02, 2015, 02:58:10 pm »
Bus? Sacrilege! That's downhill for you. It'll be over before you know it. Like all roads, the 101 is better in some spots than others. But this doesn't stand out as a stretch requiring special treatment. The coast is almost always safer southbound, but it's a bit too late for that advice.
45
Routes / The 101 south of crescent city
« Last post by lkcavanagh on July 02, 2015, 12:46:37 pm »
We met someone near avenue of the giants that suggested taking a bus over the hill just south of crescent city (we are heading north before cutting across Oregon and heading cross country). What do you think about that hill? What's the shoulder like for biking? Is it safe or is the bus a good option? While you're at it, what are the worst parts of the 101? We just did the 101 just south of orick and found it pretty harrowing!  Thanks.

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46
General Discussion / Re: What's an 'average' day?
« Last post by staehpj1 on July 02, 2015, 07:06:24 am »
There has been some mention of mileage vs smelling the roses.  My experience is that it isn't an either or choice.  Some folks manage to chat up the locals, see the sites, and even do some side hikes while doing long miles.  Some do short miles, still miss a lot of the sights, don't talk to the locals, and hole up in their campsite or a motel room for most of their down time.

How well you see the sights and meet the folks has more to do with your openness to it than the mileage you ride unless you are racing RAAM or something.  I know that even on my longest day (142 miles including a mountain pass) I managed to take a lot of pictures, meet interesting local folks, observe the wildlife, enjoy the scenery, and even sit and relax a bit.

There are a lot of hours in the day and I find it more important how you use the time both on and off the bike than how much time you have.  I guess what I am saying is that being open to the experiences is more important than allowing extra time for them.
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General Discussion / Re: What's an 'average' day?
« Last post by RonK on July 01, 2015, 11:09:12 pm »

I am not one to spend my days chatting away with strangers.  I do enjoy a good convo, but this trip is more about me and my need to go solo and get out on my own and explore.  I spend too much time around others currently, which is why this trip came up in the first place.  :)  It's going to be an opportunity for me to strike out on my own, not have to be on anyone else's schedule but my own, and spend some time reflecting.  I realize this is a bit different from what most others strive for (apparently) and this all may change after a few solo days on the road.
I too enjoy the freedom and solitude of solo touring. However my experience has been that I tend to interact more with the people I meet along the way than if I was in company.
To me it makes sense to plan shorter days in the first week while I find my touring legs and settle into the gentler rhythm of touring. Then take an extra day off when I want, ride a double day when I want, take a side trip - whatever.
48
Routes / Re: Pacific Coast Highway on a road bike?
« Last post by bobbys beard on July 01, 2015, 04:09:06 pm »
So that covers the sleeping arrangements. Then you need to add stove, cookware, fuel, food, water and sundry other camping items.
Weight (and volume) can escalate rapidly.

a stove isn't at all necessary if you're trying to pack light. Personally, the last thing I want to do at camp is spend an hour warming a can of beans, then have to clean up etc, although I've seen plenty of tourers that do it.

The PCH isn't remote at all and a decent refuel stop is never far away. snacks and a couple of bottles of water is usually plenty to get you to the next one.
49
General Discussion / Re: What's an 'average' day?
« Last post by indyfabz on July 01, 2015, 02:05:42 pm »
Long days the saddle can be great in theory until you hit days of rain and cold and wind and rough roads, etc. Also, you will see the same scenery between points A and B whether you spend 3 days going from A to B or 5 days. Some would say you will see more if you take 5 days. Since you will only have to answer to your own schedule I wouldn't worry about an average day. My second and third tours were nearly two month solo trips. Only one of the two had a firm deadline, but it was far enough off that I didn't have to worry about it much. I had daily plans for both trips, but they changed drastically depending on external and internal conditions. For example, while touring in Andalucía I planned to spend two nights in Cordoba but spent four because it was dry and warm and convenient, unlike many of the places I had just come from.

I just got back from touring the Black Hills. Winding up not doing as many miles as I had planned, in part because, on the advice of a Nebraskan I trusted, I decided to scrub the planned Nebraska portion of the trip. While I did fewer miles than expected, the flip side was that I had plenty of time to visit the mammoth site in Hot Springs and wasn't so worn out or rushed to take a cave tour at Wind Cave National Park.
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General Discussion / Re: What's an 'average' day?
« Last post by John Nelson on July 01, 2015, 01:19:30 pm »
This trip would be about sight seeing and taking in the scenery, not so much about meeting people along the way.  I have that in my daily life as it is, thankfully!!
Fair enough, but I predict that you will find that the people you meet "out there" are way different than the people you meet in daily life.
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