Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 7 ... 10
41
General Discussion / Re: What type of grades to expect on Northern Tier?
« Last post by indyfabz on May 02, 2016, 07:30:30 am »
Where in northern NJ were you? I have done a little touring up there. Some nasty hill up there. The climb up Millbrook Rd. in the Delaware Water Gap NRA heading towards Blalrstown had me walking.

In any event, 26x36 should be o.k. Heading west, you will have some 8-9% stretches on Loup Loup Pass. Mazama to Washington Pass is about 16 miles, IIRC, but you won't encounter anything in the double digits. If you do the mileage from Cut Bank, MT into Alberta, there is a steep climb of about 5 miles heading back towards the MT border, but it's manageable if you pace yourself. BTW...I highly recommend not skipping that section. Waterton Village makes a great place for a rest day. The town campsite is in a dramatic setting, and there are boat ride and hike options.
42
General Discussion / Re: What type of grades to expect on Northern Tier?
« Last post by jwrushman on May 01, 2016, 10:02:07 pm »
Thanks. That's reassuring.
43
General Discussion / Re: What type of grades to expect on Northern Tier?
« Last post by John Nelson on May 01, 2016, 09:56:08 pm »
I don't remember any 13% grades on the Northern Tier. Going To The Sun Road is the most significant climb, and very little of it is over 6%. Same with the Cascades. Sure, there are some short, steep hills in Wisconsin, but they're only 50 yards long. You'll miss the steepest hills by skipping New England.
44
General Discussion / What type of grades to expect on Northern Tier?
« Last post by jwrushman on May 01, 2016, 08:49:09 pm »
I'm not sure where this question belongs.  It's kind of about Gear, but not really.  It kind of about Routes...


I training for a cross-country ride next summer.  NJ to Niagara Falls, across southern Ontario, Michigan, Wisconsin and pick up Northern Tier.

I have a Surly Disk Trucker with 48-36-26 chainring and 11-36 cassette. 

What kind of grades can I expect on my route?

I had a rude awakening doing a two-day ride in northern NJ last week.  With 50 pounds of gear, food and water,  I had a tough time handling the two 13 to 14% grade climbs I encountered.   I know I need to lose some weight (gear and me both!) and I know I'll get stronger with time, but I'm thinking I better start doing a lot more training on serious hills with full weight.

Comments?

45
Routes / Re: TransAm trail - how fit
« Last post by staehpj1 on May 01, 2016, 03:10:55 pm »
Personally, I thought the mountains in western Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and central Missouri (Ozarks) were the toughest on the TransAm.  By comparison, the passes in Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana were easy grades.  Yes, they were long, but the grades were much easier. 
That was my observation as well.
46
Routes / Re: TransAm trail - how fit
« Last post by Pat Lamb on May 01, 2016, 02:42:20 pm »
I'm not sure how RussSeaton defines "real mountains,"

I don't consider a climb a mountain unless its 6-7-8 miles of climbing up.  Constant or varied grade.  Switchbacks too.  1-2-3 miles and its still a hill.  Maybe a loooong hill, but not a mountain.  The 4-5 mile length I guess you could put in either category depending on how vigorous you were that day.  I also think of mountains as having a pass at the top.  Usually a named pass.  Hills usually don't have pass names and elevation signs at the summit.

All of this is OBE since OP is riding west to east, but...

This incredibly restrictive definition of a "mountain" should probably be adapted for local variances.  In the southern Appalachians, we call them "gaps" instead of "passes."  Further north, the same thing may be a "notch."

Even so, the climb from the Clinch River up to Hayters Gap in Clinch Mountain, two weeks from the east coast, fits Russ' restrictive definition.  Except maybe for the sign; I don't remember one.  But then again, there wasn't a sign when I rode across Togwotee Pass (second highest pass on the TransAm).  Do people riding east get to count it as a mountain after 15 miles of climbing if there's no sign?

Personally, I thought the mountains in western Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and central Missouri (Ozarks) were the toughest on the TransAm.  By comparison, the passes in Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana were easy grades.  Yes, they were long, but the grades were much easier.  Fortunately, the OP will be ready for the tough stuff by the time he gets there coming east.
47
Routes / Re: TransAm trail - how fit
« Last post by John Nelson on May 01, 2016, 02:16:35 pm »
A fit cyclist can comfortably do it in 10 weeks. A reasonably-fit cyclist should have no trouble doing it in 13. You'll be fine.
48
Gear Talk / Re: "Adventure" bike for short rider?
« Last post by Pat Lamb on May 01, 2016, 02:09:09 pm »
I'd like to get a report back after something like 3,000 touring miles.

My father in law (a physical chemist) used to say, "Sometimes 15 minutes in the lab will resolve a question that you've been arguing on the chalkboard for two weeks!"  This might be one of those times.
49
I might be indirectly in this category.  Plan is a 2017 transam with efforts to raise funds to endow a scholarship in memory of my mother who had MS.  Honestly I'm not very good nor comfortable asking for donations so I'm still working through my thoughts/plans on this.

Good luck with your search... mark
50
Routes / Re: TransAm trail - how fit
« Last post by johnhenry on May 01, 2016, 07:48:24 am »
Thank you for the heartening responses!
Feeling better.

If you have more to add please do.
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 7 ... 10