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General Discussion / Re: Riding on the US Interstates
« Last post by JDFlood on August 28, 2014, 05:04:22 pm »
I live in the state of Washington and used to live in Arizona. They both allow riding on the Interstate, and on occasion when I am really in a hurry I do ride on them. But it is miserable with the noise and differential velocity with cars and trucks. I agree is should be legal everywhere. But there are so  many better causes to fight for, doesn't seem to be worth the effort. That is my personal feeling. I guess especially since I don't remember being in a state that prohibited it.
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Routes / Re: Great Divide Rooseville, MT to Helena, MT
« Last post by Iowagriz on August 28, 2014, 02:35:33 pm »
From my recent trip from Roosville to Ovando.

30miles of pave from Roosville, through Eureka and up the pass
54miles of pave from head of Whitefish Lake to just south of Bigfork (headed up Swan Mtn).  A few miles of gravel within this number, but not much.
Another mile or so of Hwy near Holland Lake Lodge

The rest of it was dirt.

I also believe you have a few miles of pave in Ovando, in Lincoln and then as you exit just west of Helena, you will have maybe 10 miles of pave to get into Helena.

Tom
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General Discussion / Re: Riding on the US Interstates
« Last post by indyfabz on August 28, 2014, 02:08:11 pm »
Again, all interstates are not created equal. I have ridden on I-80 in Wyoming, I-94 in North Dakota, I-90 in a couple of places in Montana and I-84 in a couple of places in Oregon.

That's a lot different than, say, trying to cross the Goethels Bridge into Staten Island, NY, which has only two narrow lanes, no shoulder and plenty of big rigs. That's a lot different than riding on the New Jersey Turnpike, where you very well might find the shoulder blocked by a disabled vehicle and a concrete wall preventing you from getting around it on the right and thus having to venture into the travel lane with vehicles flying past at speeds of over 80 mph. I could go on and on.

The blanket suggestion that all interstates should be open to bikes is not supportable from a safety (or any other) perspective.
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Gear Talk / Re: trikes
« Last post by DaveB on August 28, 2014, 01:02:29 pm »
Then there are many, many designs of standard upright trikes,which have been a part of the cycling world for 125 years now.  They sit about the same height as standard upright bicycles.
Yes, I've seen them as parts getters in industrial plants and for shopping transportation in retirement communities but i've never seen on on the road.  A combination of weight and odd handling and limited cornering ability are major disadvantages. 
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Routes / Re: Great Divide Rooseville, MT to Helena, MT
« Last post by rdchristensen on August 28, 2014, 10:35:09 am »
Thanks, it's been years since I've ridden along there, and then only on 83 and 200. Wasn't aware that there were unpaved roads paralleling those routes, so was uncertain about the ACA thumbnail maps.
Royce
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Routes / Re: Great Divide Rooseville, MT to Helena, MT
« Last post by John Nettles on August 28, 2014, 10:29:43 am »
Does your question concern the Flathead Lake area itself?  The GD does not follow the highway (nor Flathead Lake) but is up in the mountains on forest roads that parallel to MT-83. You can ride MT-83 (part of the Great Parks route) but the GD is on MT-83 maybe 2 to 3 miles total on MT-83.  There are other sections of pavement you mentioned that total up to 10% of the overall mileage between Roosville and Helena.  Also, the GD has only a few miles on MT-200 as the route stays on county & forest roads that are close to MT-200.
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Routes / Re: Great Divide Rooseville, MT to Helena, MT
« Last post by CMajernik on August 28, 2014, 09:53:46 am »
I would estimate about 5-10% is on pavement between Roosville and Helena.
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Gear Talk / Re: trikes
« Last post by TCS on August 28, 2014, 09:27:01 am »
Well, who doesn't love trikes, trikes, trikes, trikes, trikes, trikes, trikes, trikes, trikes, trikes, trikes and trikes?


You can check out this

http://youtu.be/qbv0FrfF67U?t=2m20s

video to see how much lower common tadpole recumbent trikes are than a representative recumbent bike.

Some other recumbent trikes sit higher, like the TerraTrike Rover, the Greenspeed Anura and others.

Then there are many, many designs of standard upright trikes,which have been a part of the cycling world for 125 years now.  They sit about the same height as standard upright bicycles.

Trikes make up such a fractional percentage of pedal cycles on the road that I'm skeptical a meaningful empirical analysis could be done on their relative safety.

Best,
tcs
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General Discussion / Re: Riding on the US Interstates
« Last post by Pat Lamb on August 28, 2014, 09:25:16 am »
I do stand by my statement that a truck has never slowed down behind me but mostly because I get off the road when they approach and another vehicle is oncoming. I don't trust truck drivers in this situation


Car drivers are better. Most will slow down

So you jump off the road when a truck comes up behind you unless you have a wide shoulder, but stay on the road if it's a car, and that makes truck drivers more dangerous?

I guess I've seen enough interstates with road construction (and no shoulders), bridges across major rivers (with no shoulders), in mountainous terrain (with little shoulder), or widened to the point that there's little shoulder left, that I can't buy your assertion at interstate riding is going to be safer.  For SOME rural interstates that may be the case, but remember that the speeds are typically going to be higher on an interstate than a road or surface street.  Look at the skid marks and tire tracks in the median or off the side of an interstate's traffic lane, and ask if you want to be there when somebody ran off the road doing way over the speed limit.  Add in having to navigate entrance and exit ramps in more settled areas, and I'd prefer to skip the interstate even if I could ride on it.

For the most part, I've found the AC routes to be well planned.  There's a few areas where you have to be on that road to get there, but they've done a good job of identifying low traffic roads, with generally good sight lines, and if there's not good sight lines the road twists enough that most traffic won't be flying low.
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General Discussion / Re: importance of componentry
« Last post by jrswenberger on August 28, 2014, 08:17:33 am »
I'm looking for a decent endurance or touring type drop bar bike.  I want to do a tour.  I also want my bike to be a good commuter and everyday rider.  I have absolutely no intention of racing or much of anything involving speed.  More interested in miles.  I have myself somewhat locked into Tiagra at a minimum and 105 at best.  Is this really necessary?  I know the lower I go, the less crisp the shifting will be.  A local dealer told me I wouldn't notice much difference between Sora and Tiagra, but that I would from Sora to 105.  I thought Tiagra was essentially the same thing as 105, with 105 being a cleaner and prettier look.  Would Sora or Claris suffice for a budget bike?  How much more often will the budget Claris or Sora go out of adjustment as compared to Tiagra/105?      THANKS

Keep in mind that all components are easily replaceable. Over time, you will wear them out or they will break at some point.

Recommendation - buy the middle of the pack parts for best value, upgrade later if the performance doesn't match your expectations/needs. Spend more time riding and figuring out what works for you than worrying about the pieces. For the type of riding you've described, properly setup components of any price range will make little to no difference.

Enjoy the ride,
Jay
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