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61
Routes / Re: Southern Tier Ride - September 2015
« Last post by mikelev82 on March 24, 2015, 01:54:07 am »
Hi Ian,

I'm currently riding the Southern Tier solo and will happily try to answer any questions you have. Also check out my blog at www.mikebybike.com

I also ran into the official ACA tour group yesterday. They have a Facebook group you may be interested in following. Search for 'southern tier II 2015'

Best wishes

Mike
62
Classifieds / Re: Free Pacific Coast and Great Rivers Maps
« Last post by aesopafd@hotmail.com on March 24, 2015, 12:16:28 am »
I'll take the Great Rivers.  Thanks, Bryan


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
63
GPS Discussion / Re: USBR 50 Through Indiana
« Last post by jim51 on March 23, 2015, 10:27:37 pm »
Thank You Saara Snow
64
Routes / Re: Need additional Rider or Riders ASAP.
« Last post by John Nettles on March 23, 2015, 07:32:15 pm »
Lars,

While this trip is not for me (I have already done it), I am curious as to why you "must" have 3 people to go?  I did it solo and many more cyclists do it solo or with just 1 other person than with 2+ persons.

Hope you can find a buddy, John
65
Gear Talk / Re: New Adventure Bike...from Trek!
« Last post by TwoWheeledExplorer on March 23, 2015, 06:21:24 pm »

Nope, you missed the point again.

These bikes use a geometry with a high front and short reach. The drop bars used are typically Salsa Woodchippers, but there are other similar bends which have flared drops which are intended to be ridden at the normal height of flat bars.

Actually, the Trek 920 has a Bontrager Race VR-C handlebar, which like most Bontrager drops, are not flared. It is the same handlebars as on the venerable Trek 520, which, BTW is now also available with disc brakes for $200 more than the canti version.

The Trek website (http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/city/touring/920/920/) surmises what the bike is built for: "When the pavement ends, 920 is just getting started. This rugged adventure tourer sports 29er wheels and an off-road drivetrain, giving you endless room to roam. Don’t let a little bit of gravel dissuade you. 920 is equipped to handle whatever lies on or off the beaten path, while carrying the cargo that matters most."

Salsa, on the Fargo page, says it even better; "The Fargo is our drop-bar, off-road adventure bike. A unique creature with a special set of skills, it is always willing to fulfill the most imaginative endeavor. It has developed a cult status as an off-road touring and bikepacking machine, and fuels our passion for long days in the saddle in distant lands."

I'm just happy as a clam the thing is finally actually on the market!

Ride safe,
Hans
66
Routes / Need additional Rider or Riders ASAP.
« Last post by lars714 on March 23, 2015, 06:19:03 pm »
Hello people of the forum.

This summer starting at the end of June me and two of my close friends were going to ride from NYC to FL, following the Atlantic Coast route. Recently our third man dropped out, we need three or more people to make this trip happen. And right now the trip is off.

Not many people are willing to take time out of their jobs and summers to ride a bike over 1300 miles. Thats why I have reached out to the forum, everyone here shares the same love and passion for bicycle touring. We have spent countless hours preparing and planning for this trip and now it might not happen.

Anybody considering or willing to join us contact me at larsenhawk17@gmail.com. If you need more information contact me as well.

There is no work to be done except buy your own gear and ride with us. We have done all the heavy lifting and desperately need someone to make this trip happen for us.   

All the best,
      Lars714
67
GPS Discussion / Re: USBR 50 Through Indiana
« Last post by Saara Snow on March 23, 2015, 06:12:16 pm »
Hi Jim51,

Open Street Maps would be your best bet for understanding where USBR 50 is planned in Indiana; however, it looks like the proposed route has only been partially mapped (dotted lines on the west-central side of the state): http://www.adventurecycling.org/routes-and-maps/us-bicycle-route-system/use-a-us-bicycle-route/. In our conversations with the Indiana Dept of Transportation, they have mentioned putting up a webpage for public comment, but we haven't seen this happen yet so I would recommend getting in touch with their Bicycle and Pedestrian department if you have concerns about the proposed routing and they may have more updated information on what is being planned. GPX data may become available for the route after it is designated, but to our knowledge there is none available yet.
68
Gear Talk / New Adventure Bike...from Trek!
« Last post by RonK on March 23, 2015, 04:31:42 pm »
OK, I get the point.  This may be a genre of bike - and of cycling - I haven't encountered before. Not sure about the degrees of difference between 'Adventure bike' or tourer. Isn't it all an adventure?  As for drop bars, it's like a lot of things, everyone has their favorites.
Nope, you missed the point again.

These bikes use a geometry with a high front and short reach. The drop bars used are typically Salsa Woodchippers, but there are other similar bends which have flared drops which are intended to be ridden at the normal height of flat bars.
69
GPS Discussion / Re: Best GPS for touring
« Last post by froze on March 23, 2015, 12:50:37 pm »
Can that 2000 limit waypoint problem be enlarged with a larger memory card?

I also just now found out that Garmin makes a model called the GPSMAP 64 Worldwide.  This unit has 5,000 waypoints of storage, and the cost is reasonable at around $255, and you can buy an optional bike mount kit.

I have to do more investigating into the the GPSMAP 64 vs the Etrex 30 to figure out which is more suited for cycling, someone can beat me to it that would be great.
70
Gear Talk / Re: New Adventure Bike...from Trek!
« Last post by TwoWheeledExplorer on March 23, 2015, 11:58:55 am »
In reply to what are the differences between "touring" and "adventure", I would answer that while all bicycle travel is an adventure, I believe what Trek, Salsa and Co-Motion (among others) have in mind is primarily "off-pavement" or "gravel-grinding". Adventure-themed bikes have heavier frames, wider tires, and more MTB-like gearing than touring standards, but also have the drop bars, long wheel-base and frame geometry for long-distance travel. In Europe they have called them "trekking" bikes for years. The Co-Motion Pangea and Divide and the original pre-2010 Novara Safari were the first American bikes to enter this niche of the market, followed by the Fargo from Salsa.

I see that for 2015, Novara has brought back the disk brakes and 1.9 inch (48mm) x 700 tires on the Safari, making it a new (or re-new) entry in the adventure bike niche, and although it is now just over $1000, it is still half the price of the Trek 920 or Salsa Fargo. BTW, it still retains the signature "butterfly" handlebars, too. Clearly a bike to consider if you are looking for an-entry level bike for "adventure".

I like, actually love, that the 920 has SRAM gearing. Although I have bikes with Shimano and SRAM, and one has a mix of both, I have always been a SRAM guy, but it is a matter of personal preference. I am going to wait until one shows up at a nearby Penn Cycle to make a more defined judgment, but the Trek 920 still tops my list for the bike to take the place of my venerable '06 Bianchi Volpe.

My big trip this year will be on my Cogburn CB4 fat-bike, across the western Adirondacks, where I grew up and where I was a licensed guide in the 1980s before we moved to MN.

Ride safe,
Hans
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