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General Discussion / Re: One piece earphone while riding
« Last post by Nyimbo on September 14, 2016, 11:19:44 pm »
I think it works well with one earphone in fact in California where I am it's the law that you use one ear only.
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General Discussion / Re: southern tier
« Last post by RussSeaton on September 14, 2016, 10:55:27 pm »
I have been cycling a lot, 550 mile trips, over 1700 miles this year.  I will also be supported most of the time (daughter, wife).  I will have to self-support for a bit.

My experience is that riding every day reduces insulin needs, but can increase frequency of changing infusion sites.  Carrying lots of cliff bars and fig newtons to deal with hypoglycemia has been effective.

Resupplying insulin should be possible.  My endocrinologist will give me written prescriptions to carry and even if I can't get Medicare to cover it, I'll just pay for it.

I'd still like to know which regime you are on now.  Manual injections with regular bolus, Lantus/Levemir/NPH basal?  Or pump?  CGMS too?  You mention infusion sites so assuming pump.  CGMS too?  Having support will make things easier.  Your support can drive to a pharmacy 50 miles away while you are riding that day.  There will still be issues with ordering supplies each month and getting them delivered to you.  Assuming you do not fill a new prescription at a pharmacy every time you run out of something.  But get an old prescription refilled at home and shipped to you on the road.  But probably less critical if you have mobile support along.  And can resupply for an entire month before you start the unsupported sections.  Assume the unsupported sections will be one month or less in duration.  Guessing a "support-no-support-no-support" pattern.

Yes riding does reduce insulin quantity.  Maybe one fourth to one half less basal and less bolus too during the rides.  Same bolus amounts after the rides in the evening.  But you will want to increase the amount of blood tests during the day.  Glucose can change quickly.  A blood test every hour during the ride would not be out of line.  So you will be using more blood test strips during this trip than at home.  And with more frequent infusion site changes, then more cannula changes.
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General Discussion / One piece earphone while riding
« Last post by FerdieM on September 14, 2016, 10:39:43 pm »
Hi guys!

Anybody use an iPod or any other mp3 players while on the road? I personally believe that listening to music helps during my workout.

Though I haven't tried cycling on the road while using my iPod, would it be dangerous to wear headphones or earphones while riding as you will not hear traffic or cars approaching? But how about if i just use 1 ear piece instead of 2?? I was just curious if anybody else do this.

Thanks for the tips in advance!
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General Discussion / Re: southern tier
« Last post by staehpj1 on September 14, 2016, 04:17:23 pm »
I guess my worry is how my body will cope with riding day in and day out for so long.  In October, we are riding across North Carolina --7 days, 550 miles-- with real mountains so  I  should  get an idea what that will feel like.. My sense is that if I can do this, more will be possible
I think that if you ride sensible for you daily distances you will be fine.  Do be careful with managing your diabetes though as there are some pretty remote places where getting in trouble has higher penalties.  On the other hand in the more remote sections of the Southwest most people will stop to assist if they see someone in trouble.
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General Discussion / Re: southern tier
« Last post by hip on September 14, 2016, 03:59:24 pm »
Thank you both for your thoughts.  I have been cycling a lot, 550 mile trips, over 1700 miles this year so far so I feel like I'm in good enough condition to do this.  I will also be supported most of the time (daughter, wife) so I shouldn't have to carry much.  I will have to self-support for a bit, but having done lots of backpacking, I have all  the equipment except for a light tent or bivy.

 My experience is that riding every day reduces insulin needs, but can increase frequency of changing infusion sites.  Carrying lots of cliff bars and fig newtons to deal with hypoglycemia has been effective.
Resupplying insulin should be possible.  My endocrinologist will  give me written prescriptions to carry and even if I can't get Medicare to cover it, I'll just pay for it.

I guess my worry is how my body will cope with riding day in and day out for so long.  In October, we are riding across North Carolina --7 days, 550 miles-- with real mountains so  I  should  get an idea what that will feel like.. My sense is that if I can do this, more will be possible
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I am kind of a minimalist packing as little as 12 pounds of gear for a camping and cooking trip.  So keep that in mind when reading my suggestions.

For a rain/wind jacket I usually go with a light DWR wind shirt and don't use a real rain coat.  I tend to be soaked either way, whether it is from the rain or sweat, so I just need to keep the wind chill off.  I have used a Stoic Wraith windshirt and more recently a Northface one.  They are in the 3-4 ounce range.  I didn't find either for sale just now when I did a google search though.  If I am somewhere that I expect a lot of rain I have carried a Dri Ducks emergency poncho (2.8 oz.) for in camp.

I have carried a 12 oz. down vest as a pillow, but I have grown attached to my Exped UL pillow (2 oz.) so I have not taken it the last few trips.  I do take a puffy down sweater sometimes but do not usually wear it while riding.  It is a Outdoor Research Filament Down Pullover and weighs 7.3 oz.

I really like my Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad.  It is super comfy, packs tiny and weighs only 12 oz.
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I've tried many rain jacket materials over the years, and keep coming back to genuine Gore-Tex. It's not perfect, but I find it is still the best thing going (they have made constant improvements over the years). The DWR coatings work ok for a while, but must be renewed occasionally and tend not to stand up to all-day rain. I w tried Marmot's PreCip jacket, Patagonia's version, etc. All are pretty good for the price, but not as waterproof as I'd like.

Biking-specific raincoats often leave off the hood, as yin don't need it when wearing a helmet (side note: waterproof helmet covers are useful). But for off-bike use in the rain you'll want a hood. They are harder to find nowadays, but a good Gore-Tex jacket with a zip-off or rollable hood works well.

For the past year or so I've had good luck with the Marmot Minimalist GTX jacket, which is unlined, fairly lightweight, packable, and looks pretty decent. REI just had them on sale for $139, and I think normally they are around $170 or so. LL Bean also makes a decent GTX jacket called the "Traveler," which I have also, but it's a bit heavier and is a lined jacket. Also check out Cabela's lower-priced GTX jackets, which I think are very good values.
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Routes / Re: Seattle to Anacortes--First time touring
« Last post by erniegrillo on September 13, 2016, 08:21:37 pm »
If you are not opposed to taking a bus for a part of your journey,
Put your bike on the bus and take the bus to Mukilteo or Lynnwood.
Highway 525 is busy but has shoulders or bike lanes. Whidbey is
very hilly but the side roads on the east and west of the main road
are lightly traveled and the scenery is spectacular.
 Whidbey has some of the best scenery and best riding I've found.
A fee map of the island is available at the ferry terminal or from any real estate office.
Ft Ebby and Deception Pass have great camping. 
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I might be an outlier but on my TransAmerica trip going W-E I was cold much more than anything. Especially at night when it often got into 30's and almost always down to the 40's at night - and a few times in the daytime.  I survived by layering but I hated to layer up in the night and mornings with my riding clothes. I could stay warm by adding to my off bike clothes my long sleeve jersey and regular  jersey and REI showers pass clone jacket as needed, but it wasn't all that comfortable for me.  When I got to Dillion MT I discovered a Patagonia outlet and they were having a great sale on everything.   Bought a puff jacket with hood, filled with primaloft (because as Pat said down is not recommended in case it gets wet).  The rest of my trip I wore it on cold evenings, slept in it on the coldest nights and wore it every morning until I got to eastern Colorado and the weather changed dramatically.

It would work fine folded up in the pocket for a small pillow.  I had that covered with a small foam travel pillow, my best luxury - I won't travel in the mountains without the jacket from now on.  BTW Pat mentioned he didn't see people wearing them - perhaps because I bought one in route I was noticing - but I saw several people over the several weeks with similar (thin-down-like) jackets.  Saw three people in one Yellowstone campground that had these type jackets on a cold evening. Well two plus me, but we were all warm.
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Routes / Re: Pacific Coast - Seattle to SF - Fall 2016
« Last post by PhilPub on September 13, 2016, 05:26:42 pm »
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