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81
General Discussion / Re: southern tier
« Last post by hip on September 15, 2016, 08:35:30 am »
Yes, I'm on a medtonic pump with Novalog.  My normal pattern with a long ride is to bolus covering my meal, then after an hour of riding, turn the pump off.  I do not use a CGM because of constant false  readings when riding.   CGMs don't work well with exercise -- interstitial levels don't match well with blood glucose when levels are changing rapidly.  I have learned to check manually frequently and I have pretty good awareness.  I know this is important and dangerous so I pay attention.

My daughter be supporting me for the first 3 weeks, and my wife for the last  3.  Its up to me to get from one to the other and I have only 8 weeks before I have to be back at work.  If I don't finish, then I  won't.  Might have to go back and finish some time later in the year, but I don't  want to start with that attitude.
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General Discussion / Re: One piece earphone while riding
« Last post by staehpj1 on September 15, 2016, 08:16:31 am »
I do not often wear earbuds while riding, but will say that I have not found them to block my hearing much if the volume isn't cranked too high.  My rule of thumb is that if I can't hear the tires of passing cars well before they reach me on a low traffic road I wouldn't take the chance or would look for different ear buds.  I have worn them for many hours of trail running and always found that I could hear a faster runner approaching quietly behind me.

Most of the time I just play music in my head or even sing out loud when on tour if I want music, but there have been times when an audio book was a nice thing.  Crossing the emptiness of West Texas or Kansas I think that sometimes listening to something actually kept me more awake and alert.

People tend to have pretty strong opinions on this topic.  I do not other than to say that if it makes you oblivious to your surroundings you shouldn't do it.  If you are still alert and can hear cars approaching from behind I wouldn't consider it a bad thing.
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General Discussion / Re: One piece earphone while riding
« Last post by briwasson on September 15, 2016, 08:10:53 am »
Some people use those tiny Bluetooth external speakers while biking.
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General Discussion / Re: One piece earphone while riding
« Last post by John Nelson on September 15, 2016, 12:07:34 am »
Whether or not it's safe to ride with music is a debate that goes on forever and has no answer.
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General Discussion / Re: One piece earphone while riding
« Last post by Nyimbo on September 14, 2016, 11:19:44 pm »
I think it works well with one earphone in fact in California where I am it's the law that you use one ear only.
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General Discussion / Re: southern tier
« Last post by RussSeaton on September 14, 2016, 10:55:27 pm »
I have been cycling a lot, 550 mile trips, over 1700 miles this year.  I will also be supported most of the time (daughter, wife).  I will have to self-support for a bit.

My experience is that riding every day reduces insulin needs, but can increase frequency of changing infusion sites.  Carrying lots of cliff bars and fig newtons to deal with hypoglycemia has been effective.

Resupplying insulin should be possible.  My endocrinologist will give me written prescriptions to carry and even if I can't get Medicare to cover it, I'll just pay for it.

I'd still like to know which regime you are on now.  Manual injections with regular bolus, Lantus/Levemir/NPH basal?  Or pump?  CGMS too?  You mention infusion sites so assuming pump.  CGMS too?  Having support will make things easier.  Your support can drive to a pharmacy 50 miles away while you are riding that day.  There will still be issues with ordering supplies each month and getting them delivered to you.  Assuming you do not fill a new prescription at a pharmacy every time you run out of something.  But get an old prescription refilled at home and shipped to you on the road.  But probably less critical if you have mobile support along.  And can resupply for an entire month before you start the unsupported sections.  Assume the unsupported sections will be one month or less in duration.  Guessing a "support-no-support-no-support" pattern.

Yes riding does reduce insulin quantity.  Maybe one fourth to one half less basal and less bolus too during the rides.  Same bolus amounts after the rides in the evening.  But you will want to increase the amount of blood tests during the day.  Glucose can change quickly.  A blood test every hour during the ride would not be out of line.  So you will be using more blood test strips during this trip than at home.  And with more frequent infusion site changes, then more cannula changes.
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General Discussion / One piece earphone while riding
« Last post by FerdieM on September 14, 2016, 10:39:43 pm »
Hi guys!

Anybody use an iPod or any other mp3 players while on the road? I personally believe that listening to music helps during my workout.

Though I haven't tried cycling on the road while using my iPod, would it be dangerous to wear headphones or earphones while riding as you will not hear traffic or cars approaching? But how about if i just use 1 ear piece instead of 2?? I was just curious if anybody else do this.

Thanks for the tips in advance!
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General Discussion / Re: southern tier
« Last post by staehpj1 on September 14, 2016, 04:17:23 pm »
I guess my worry is how my body will cope with riding day in and day out for so long.  In October, we are riding across North Carolina --7 days, 550 miles-- with real mountains so  I  should  get an idea what that will feel like.. My sense is that if I can do this, more will be possible
I think that if you ride sensible for you daily distances you will be fine.  Do be careful with managing your diabetes though as there are some pretty remote places where getting in trouble has higher penalties.  On the other hand in the more remote sections of the Southwest most people will stop to assist if they see someone in trouble.
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General Discussion / Re: southern tier
« Last post by hip on September 14, 2016, 03:59:24 pm »
Thank you both for your thoughts.  I have been cycling a lot, 550 mile trips, over 1700 miles this year so far so I feel like I'm in good enough condition to do this.  I will also be supported most of the time (daughter, wife) so I shouldn't have to carry much.  I will have to self-support for a bit, but having done lots of backpacking, I have all  the equipment except for a light tent or bivy.

 My experience is that riding every day reduces insulin needs, but can increase frequency of changing infusion sites.  Carrying lots of cliff bars and fig newtons to deal with hypoglycemia has been effective.
Resupplying insulin should be possible.  My endocrinologist will  give me written prescriptions to carry and even if I can't get Medicare to cover it, I'll just pay for it.

I guess my worry is how my body will cope with riding day in and day out for so long.  In October, we are riding across North Carolina --7 days, 550 miles-- with real mountains so  I  should  get an idea what that will feel like.. My sense is that if I can do this, more will be possible
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I am kind of a minimalist packing as little as 12 pounds of gear for a camping and cooking trip.  So keep that in mind when reading my suggestions.

For a rain/wind jacket I usually go with a light DWR wind shirt and don't use a real rain coat.  I tend to be soaked either way, whether it is from the rain or sweat, so I just need to keep the wind chill off.  I have used a Stoic Wraith windshirt and more recently a Northface one.  They are in the 3-4 ounce range.  I didn't find either for sale just now when I did a google search though.  If I am somewhere that I expect a lot of rain I have carried a Dri Ducks emergency poncho (2.8 oz.) for in camp.

I have carried a 12 oz. down vest as a pillow, but I have grown attached to my Exped UL pillow (2 oz.) so I have not taken it the last few trips.  I do take a puffy down sweater sometimes but do not usually wear it while riding.  It is a Outdoor Research Filament Down Pullover and weighs 7.3 oz.

I really like my Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XLite Sleeping Pad.  It is super comfy, packs tiny and weighs only 12 oz.
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