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81
General Discussion / Re: Bicycle tools for a cross country ride
« Last post by Patco on June 25, 2015, 07:35:07 pm »
As John stated, there is no clear answer. For me, it is what will make me comfortable while minimizing weight. My packing is usually a result of what happened on a previous trip. For that reason I generally take too may tubes (five) because on one trip I ran out of tubes (I had two) and found myself in a land of mountain bike tubes, but no road bike tubes (I ride 28's on tour). Like John, I will take a fiberfix, and I will also have two extra spokes. I have the necessary tools to tighten nuts and adjust cables and brakes. I have a spoke tightening tool. I do not take a cassette removal tool. I have a small container of extra nuts and bolts. I take a small amount of duct tape. I have two zip ties. I have two flat repair kits (again, overkill, but there is always a story). I do not take new cables, but I do ensure that all cables are in great shape before I begin a tour. I take extra brake pads (four). I replace my tires with new tires before the start of any lengthy tour so I do not carry a foldable spare. I have an emergency Park Tool tire boot. I take an extra battery for my cycle computer. I have a small bottle of Dumonde Tech (lite) lube. I have a chain removal tool and extra links. I am sure there may be one or two items that I carry that I am unable to recall, but as I stated earlier, some of what I carry is based on something that happened on a tour and I vowed, not again. Different strokes.
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General Discussion / What can towns offer cyclists?
« Last post by PittsburgCommunityDevelop on June 25, 2015, 06:45:50 pm »
Greetings cyclists,

I am the Community Development Director for the City of Pittsburg, Kansas, which is on the Transamerica route.  We would like to be more welcoming to cyclists as they come through town.  Not being an adventure cyclist myself, I have no idea what ya'll need or want from the communities you're trekking through.

We currently have an RV park, with a covered shelter and restrooms, where cyclists are able to pitch tents (it's in a shady spot!) and stay overnight.  What other things could we offer?

Thanks in advance for your input!

Becky Gray
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Routes / Re: Ideas for a Musical Route
« Last post by JasmineReeseII on June 25, 2015, 06:15:26 pm »
Yeah, me too. The road taught me so much, and I can't wait to see what it teaches me about music and the people behind it.

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Routes / Re: Ideas for a Musical Route
« Last post by staehpj1 on June 25, 2015, 05:59:32 pm »
I am doing world travel this time around,  so just trying to figure out the U.S portion.

That sounds exciting.  I love the idea of a music themed tour.
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Routes / Re: Ideas for a Musical Route
« Last post by JasmineReeseII on June 25, 2015, 05:56:49 pm »
I am doing world travel this time around,  so just trying to figure out the U.S portion.

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87
Routes / Re: Ideas for a Musical Route
« Last post by JasmineReeseII on June 25, 2015, 05:53:36 pm »
What is route that does not get too secluded?
How long of a route are you looking for?

All the typical coast to coast routes have a lot of fairly remote country.  Still even on those you meet some really nice folks in the tiny towns they pass through and you could choose to go into bigger towns and cities more often if you want.  Both the Atlantic and Pacific coast routes will be more populated, but will still have more remote feeling sections than you might think.

The Crooked Road in rural Virginia has a music theme.  It would involve some difficult climbing though.  It is 333 miles long.  The Blues Highway runs from Chicago to New Orleans.  I have heard varying opinions on how suitable either might be for a bike tour, but at a glance both looked interesting to me.  You would need to do some research to see that they were suitable routes.

Either of those have a music theme that would likely make it easier to meet other musicians, neither is established as a bike touring route as far as I know.
That is all great! I will do my research. We are going for 4 or 5 years,  so time is not an issue.

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88
Routes / Re: Ideas for a Musical Route
« Last post by staehpj1 on June 25, 2015, 05:43:59 pm »
What is route that does not get too secluded?
How long of a route are you looking for?

All the typical coast to coast routes have a lot of fairly remote country.  Still even on those you meet some really nice folks in the tiny towns they pass through and you could choose to go into bigger towns and cities more often if you want.  Both the Atlantic and Pacific coast routes will be more populated, but will still have more remote feeling sections than you might think.

The Crooked Road in rural Virginia has a music theme.  It would involve some difficult climbing though.  It is 333 miles long.  The Blues Highway runs from Chicago to New Orleans.  I have heard varying opinions on how suitable either might be for a bike tour, but at a glance both looked interesting to me.  You would need to do some research to see that they were suitable routes.

Either of those have a music theme that would likely make it easier to meet other musicians, neither is established as a bike touring route as far as I know.
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Routes / Ideas for a Musical Route
« Last post by JasmineReeseII on June 25, 2015, 03:02:55 pm »
Hey everyone!

Some of you may remember. I was the crazy girl with no touring experiencing who wanted to bicycle across the U.S. with my doggy back in 2013.

Well, I did it, and I loved it so much.  So, I am planning on departing again. This time, however,  I am hoping to take a route that, while beautiful, does not take me away from people. I am taking my violin this time around in hopes to collaborate with musicians from all backgrounds,  cultures and so on.

What is route that does not get too secluded?

Thanks!

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General Discussion / Re: Bicycle tools for a cross country ride
« Last post by John Nelson on June 25, 2015, 08:54:19 am »
There is no clear answer. Being able to fix a flat is essential, but everything else is optional. How do you feel about hitching a ride? How much extra time do you have to deal with problems?

If the tour is long enough, you will probably need to adjust and replace brakes. You may need a new chain along the way, but you can probably acquire it en route. You may need new tires, and good ones are harder to find en route. You may need new cables. Carry an extra tube or two as not all flats are patchable. A FiberFix can fix a broken spoke until you get to the next bike shop.

I carry a cassette removal tool, but have never used it on tour. I carry chain repair tools and parts, but have never used them on tour. I'm sure many others have needed them. It's just a probability game. Everyone gets to make their own trade offs of weight and risk. And there is always anxiety involved in making the choices. When touring with others you can share the load, so you can take more.
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