Recent Posts

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91
Gear Talk / Re: Recommendation for front light?
« Last post by paddleboy17 on November 30, 2016, 12:44:08 pm »
I have used the Paul stem cap light mount as I do a lot of night riding over the winter.   I have picture of mine down below.  I have something called a Moose Mit on my winter bike that I need to raise the light above.  Moose Mits are a pogie that gives you a nice pocket over your handle bars to keep your hands warm.

I have also used the Minouri T mount.  I find it a little light duty for this, but it is nice in that you can fine tune the rise.

Paul Components makes another thingy similar to the Gino light might.
I think it is intended for mounting a light off the wheel axis (it replaces one end of a wheel skewer).   I got creative and fabbed this up, to mount mid fork, but I have not used it yet.  It based on a Tubus fork mounting kit that I bought from the Touring Store (http://thetouringstore.com/thetouringstore/tubus-bicycle-racks-for-touring-and-commuting/tubus-fit-solutions/), and the Gino like Paul Components thingy.

I also have a Planet Bike Blaze light that I take on tour.  I have had it long enough that the lettering is rubbed off.  It takes two AA batteries, but I think it has to be brighter than the 45 lumen Blaze 1/2 Watt that it resembles.  If you are serious about night riding, it pays to take two lights:  one on your handle bars and one on your helmet.  For touring, I might mount a Blackburn Voyager 3.3 on my helmet.  I don't know if the Voyager 3.3 is still in production, but it is small, light, runs on 4 AAA batteries, and most import for a helmet light--it has a really tight beam.  I try not to tax night riding when on tour, but "things do happen".
92
Gear Talk / Re: Recommendation for front light?
« Last post by paddleboy17 on November 30, 2016, 12:26:46 pm »
Paddleboy17 - I think your idea could work for me.  Please post a picture.  I think I have a pretty good idea of what you're talking about.

Here is the light mount that I fabricated up for my Tubus Tara front rack.

Some things that might not be apparent...

There is some rubber stripping from an old inner tube between the PVC pipe and the rack hoop.  This increased the contact point and allowed the hose clamp to get a stronger grip.  It also protects the paint on the rack.  PVC can be a little slippery for some bike light mounts, so I wrapped the PVC with rubber stripping and secured it with tie wraps.  A better implementation might be to take a small inner tube, say a 700x23, and stretch it over the whole pipe.  With all the inner tubes I have butchered for rubber strips I was feeling too miserly that day to butcher a brand new 700x23 tube.
93
Canada / Re: Bike transport by train
« Last post by canalligators on November 30, 2016, 12:03:30 pm »
Have you looked at the Via Rail Canada site?
94
Gear Talk / Re: Long distance tour bike for small lady
« Last post by canalligators on November 30, 2016, 12:01:36 pm »
If your mind is open, my wife is 5'2" and a Lightning P38 fit her well.
95
Gear Talk / Re: Recommendation for front light?
« Last post by driftlessregion on November 30, 2016, 11:06:15 am »
The Minoura T shaped mount clamps to the stem between the cap and the handlebar and has room for two items. It might have room for the light on one side and the phone on the other. Good luck.
96
General Discussion / Re: Which Route Would You Suggest?
« Last post by capnjammer on November 30, 2016, 08:16:16 am »
Hi All,

Many thanks to you all for your replies..

It's taken me so long to reply as there have been some changes to my plans!

Not long after I posted on this forum my friend who lives near Seattle told me he was getting married in August. So as it looks like I'll be heading that way this summer anyway, it makes sense to plan a route in that area, so I've decided on the following. I'd love some of your opinions on it..

So from my friend's place in Kingston, WA I'll follow the Washington Parks route anti-clockwise around the Olympic National Park to Yakima, then take the 82 (or similar) down (S/E) until I reach the Lewis & Clark Trail which I'll follow to Missoula. From there I'll follow the Great Parks North route up to Eureka where I'll follow the Northern Tier route west until I pick up the Washington Parks route which takes me back to Kingston.

Altogether it's around 1670 miles, over about 42 days including 12 zero (or near enough) mileage days. Rest days scheduled for Whitaker's Bunkhouse, Kennewick, Missoula, Sandpoint, Winthrop and Mt. Vernon. Average daily mileage is around 55 miles, with a max mileage day topping out at around 70 miles. Daily miles are dictated by the campsite options.

I appreciate that the best laid plans can very easily change when you're on the road, that's part of why I love it.. But at the same time I just can't resist planning a trip!

I chose against taking the Pacific Coast route as I've seen a lot of the West Coast already from top to bottom, so decided on something a little different this time.

As I say, I'd much appreciate any opinions and views you might have on this planned route. One thing in particular I've not planned for is the contours of the land and any climbs I might have to do. I appreciate that they will affect my daily mileage and that a mountainous area will be a lot slower than a flat one!

Thanks for all input..


97
General Discussion / Re: best sleeping bag for bike packing?
« Last post by johnsondasw on November 30, 2016, 01:20:02 am »
Just about every outdoor clothing company make a down puffy jacket that packs into its own pocket,which makes it smaller than a loaf of bread.  They are also super light.  Put that on for the night and it changes the formula for which sleeping bag you need. 
98
Gear Talk / Re: trailers vs panniers
« Last post by fastrog on November 29, 2016, 07:07:30 pm »
thanks to all.
99
General Discussion / Re: trikes
« Last post by fastrog on November 29, 2016, 06:47:18 pm »
thanks, everybody. i DID own a 2-wheel recumbent (bachetta) and tried it off and on for a year. hated it. could not keep my balance. starting and stopping were hell. at speed it was doable, but still squirrely. i cannot imagine it loaded for a tour. i was hoping a trike would have the advantages of recumbent without balance issues. the two brands that seem the most common are rated for 275-300 pounds, and i do not need nearly that much gear. so, next question: i've got a dutch dog 2-wheel trailer rated to 50 pounds. any comments for that over two big panniers over the rear wheel of the trike?
100
Gear Talk / Re: trailers vs panniers
« Last post by aggie on November 29, 2016, 06:30:10 pm »
As you can see there are various opinions on the topic.  I've tried both and I prefer a trailer for a longer tour.  I don't like the way my bike handles with loaded panniers and I've never had a problem packing the trailer.  By the time you add the racks and the panniers they aren't that much lighter than a trailer unless you count ounces like a racer.  You will have to just try them both and see what works for you.
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