Author Topic: A question for the more mature on which bike to tour >>>>  (Read 2084 times)

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Offline tonythomson

A question for the more mature on which bike to tour >>>>
« on: November 20, 2011, 11:44:09 am »
Check out my web site http://www.tonystravels.com/ and you'll see I've done several long distant rides using up to date technology.  As a collector of vintage bikes I have an idea to combine touring using an oldie.  What vintage bike would you recommend? (mine in USA are mainly the fat tyre with fake tanks on - not really suitable for long distance)

Looking for something a bit different but would do the job. 

One idea I have is to use a WW2 paratroopers folding bike, which if they would let me at my local parachute club in Florida, and start the ride by jumping with it and then heading off.  (It's the one featured in a Discovery Channel recent film and I have here in UK now) There are no gears on it so Florida touring would suit or up the Atlantic Coast and onto C&O Canal.  All pretty flat I think.

Look forward to your views even if it's a tour of fancy or in the case of the para bike maybe a flight of fancy  ;)

Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline csykes

Re: A question for the more mature on which bike to tour >>>>
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2011, 12:05:47 pm »
I have often thought of finding a nice Peugeot, Raleigh, or similar bike from the 1960s and using it for touring after making a few modifications.  I saw a really nice Austro-Daimler with a granny chain ring for sale in my LBS, but it was 3 frame sizes too small. 

Offline Mark Manley

Re: A question for the more mature on which bike to tour >>>>
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2011, 03:47:22 pm »
How about a Raleigh Chopper? Although more suited to a journey back to your childhood than anywhere else, you will need deep pockets given what they fetch now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Raleigh_Chopper-001.jpg

Offline ducnut

Re: A question for the more mature on which bike to tour >>>>
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2011, 04:39:20 pm »
Given that you're in the UK, I'd fancy something English, as they'd be easy to find.

I don't exactly know when Raleigh-Nottingham started/stopped making cassette-geared bikes. I've seen some early 70's stuff that'd probably work. I've been watching eBay for something to use as a project and find out what exactly will work for derailluers and cassette. I've been messing with early 60's stuff. I currently have a '63 BSA, '63 Phillips Ranger, and '64 Armstrong. I, also, have a couple '79 10-speed models, but, they're made in Thailand and not near the quality of the Nottingham stuff (too nice to see go to the scrapyard). Anyway, my 60's bikes are all 26", 3-speed Raleigh Industries (RI) bikes. Everything I've seen, except for race bikes, have dropout eyelets and are lugged (not high-end cast). They easily can be upgraded with modern components. The 3-speed frames have 120mm rear and 90mm front spacing (my Thai 10-speed bikes are 130/100, respectively) and no derailluer provision, so 3-speed frames are out. The BB and headset are 26TPI, but, that's no problem. The steerer can be re-threaded to 24TPI by any bike shop. That'll allow you to run any modern 1"X24TPI headset. The BB is the same diameter as Campy and can be re-threaded, too. That'll allow you to run any Campy-dimensioned BB. Modern 700c wheelsets fit, using standard dual-pivot brakes. A 25mm tire is all that will fit with 35mm fenders. Otherwise, you can run up to 32mm, depending on actual dimension. The seatpost is 25.4mm and the stem is, also, 25.4mm. That means you can run a modern seatpost and quill or adapter stem. So, with all that, I'd try to find an early 70's, Nottingham-built, 26", 10 speed Raleigh Industries bike. They ride super-nice and are compliant.

To get ideas started, this is my BSA single-speed project. The bar and seat position are just slipped together. It's actually on the road, but, awaiting decals. Maybe, I'll update this thread, when it's done.



Offline Mark Manley

Re: A question for the more mature on which bike to tour >>>>
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2011, 01:45:59 am »
Your BSA looks like the bike me and many of my friends had in the early to mid 1970's, I think they were the same bike produced by Raleigh in Nottingham but badged up as BSA, Triumph and possibly Sun, fitted with single speed or Sturmey Archer three speed. Mine was a Raleigh three speed in black with old fashioned pull back bars which I changed quickly. It was made for the US market with the guarantee label addressed to its US headquarters but it has somehow found its way into the UK market.
 

Offline ducnut

Re: A question for the more mature on which bike to tour >>>>
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2011, 11:02:07 am »
Your BSA looks like the bike me and many of my friends had in the early to mid 1970's, I think they were the same bike produced by Raleigh in Nottingham but badged up as BSA, Triumph and possibly Sun, fitted with single speed or Sturmey Archer three speed.

Triumph, Humber, Raleigh, Rudge, Sunbeam, Norman, Three Spires, Hercules, New Hudson, Sun, Phillips, Carlton, and Moulton(?) are the nameplates I know of. Most of the differences were just badge engineering and a brand-specific chainwheel. I watch nearly all those nameplates on eBay for parts, as one never knows what'll pop up.

One's bicycling history has caused several people to stop me and ask about the bike. I've had three take spins on it and two have solicited buildups. I'm in the midst of gathering parts for one and still planning components and powder for the other. These English lightweights ride really nice and offer a lot of function, with modern components.