Author Topic: Brooks Mud Flaps  (Read 3936 times)

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Offline eddiefromohio

Brooks Mud Flaps
« on: November 27, 2011, 09:31:44 pm »
Brooks Mud Flaps:

I have SKS fenders on the front and back of my Surly Long Haul Trucker.  I want to put on Brooks leather mud flaps.

1. Is it a good idea to have one on the back fender as well as the front fender?  What purpose would the rear mud flap serve?

2. Do the leather mud flaps need treated with Proofide ever?  (Before installing / annually / when dry ? )

3. Is a drill the best way to make the holes in the fender? 

I welcome any other suggestions on caring for and installing the Brooks Leather Mud Flaps.

Joe B

  • Guest
Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2011, 10:51:33 pm »
What material are the SKS fenders made of ? Plastic, carbon, and some aluminum may not be suitable for the mounting hole stress points. Stainless is the preferred material for flaps.

In regards to the questions...

1) The rear flap is completely optional, if you ride with others in a pace line or in close formations, your following riders will appreciate the thoughtfulness of a rear flap. In my opinion a pair of flaps looks better and more elegant.

2) I believe that the flaps are oil impregnated due to the abuse they are designed to withstand, I am certain if any maintenance is required the directions will be included with them. The Brooks site has a comment on the review page that states to just Proofhide them if they look dry.

3) Use a center punch  or nail to create a small dimple where you want to drill the metal. This will keep the drill from skittering about untill it takes purchase in the material. De-burr the hole on both sides and use a nylon insert locknut to secure. Or if your feeling decorative, brass rivets.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 10:58:58 pm by Joe B »

Offline driftlessregion

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2011, 11:14:59 pm »
I wish all my friends would have a nice long fender and flap on the rear! Many a ride lacked conversation or drafting because of the plume of water coming off a short fender in the rear.

Offline bogiesan

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2011, 08:51:42 am »
I wish all my friends would have a nice long fender and flap on the rear! Many a ride lacked conversation or drafting because of the plume of water coming off a short fender in the rear.

Never thought of that! Thanks.

Never thought of mudflaps as a style statement, either. Leather mudflaps? sheesh.
My first mudflaps were cut from plastic milk jugs and held in place with zipties.
I like the rubber flaps from that outfit that makes all the retro doodads because they have a chrome strip along the bottom edge that keeps the thing from flapping up at speeds. You must drill two holes in your fenders to mount these flaps. I've had mine mounted on my carbon fiber fenders for more than ten years.
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2011, 10:13:44 am »
I drilled holes to mount a flap on my SKS fender a dozen years ago.  No problems with the drilling, and the fenders have held up fine.  Mine's cheap and light (piece of a shampoo bottle), so I don't know how the extra weight of leather would affect longevity.

Offline ducnut

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2011, 12:36:26 pm »
1. Yes. As mentioned, it helps keep down spray and debris for following riders. My GF regularly drafts me and appreciates the fender and flap. And, a rear flaps looks nicer.
2. Yes. I use neatsfoot oil on my saddle and flaps, as it soaks right in and works brilliantly. It helps to protect and keep them pliable. I've never used Proofride.
3. Yes. I used a drill and took my time. I put a piece of masking tape across the fender, to help with marking hole locations.

Also, ditch the included nuts. Go to the hardware store and buy nyloc nuts. Install them with threadlocker. I noticed the included nuts loosening, with every ride, and kept tightening them. Eventually, the rear flap fell off, along a busy highway. I didn't notice until I stopped for a break. I had to backtrack to find it. Fortunately, it was only a few miles back.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2011, 03:06:56 pm »
Also, ditch the included nuts. Go to the hardware store and buy nyloc nuts. Install them with threadlocker.

If you (or a friend) have a rivet gun, stainless rivets work well for this application.  If you don't have one, this is a great excuse to get one!

Offline ducnut

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2011, 03:31:55 pm »
Also, ditch the included nuts. Go to the hardware store and buy nyloc nuts. Install them with threadlocker.

If you (or a friend) have a rivet gun, stainless rivets work well for this application.  If you don't have one, this is a great excuse to get one!

I've got one. Just never thought of it. Thanks!

Offline eddiefromohio

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2011, 11:25:32 pm »
The fenders I have are SKS Plastic fenders.  Here is a response I got from Brooks England through their facebook page about installing their leather mudflaps on plastic fenders.
With plastic fenders, we recommend using a heavy tape on both sides of the fender where you are going to drill to keep the plastic from splitting.

Offline eddiefromohio

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2011, 02:52:00 pm »
The following three questions/answers are a response I received from Brooks England in an e-mail on Novmber 29, 2011 regarding their leather mud flaps.

1.  Do I need to put Proofide on the mud flap before putting it on my fender?
1.  You do not need to apply Proofide to it before you put it on your bike.

2.  Is there a time when I will need to put Proofide on the mud flap?
2.  We recommend that you treat the mud flaps as you would a saddle and apply a   small amount of Proofide to the surface of the mud flaps     
     every 6 months or so.

3.  What size drill bit (inches) do you recommend using to put holes in the fender? Or is there a better way to put the holes in the fender other     
     than drilling?
3.  The holes are 6mm in diameter, so the nearest fractional inch is 15/64 and we do not know of a better way to put the holes in.

Offline pptouring

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2011, 07:24:09 pm »
My daughter, wife, a family friend, and myself all have SKS fenders and we all have mud flaps. For the front, we each installed a Cascadia Road Mudflap. For the rear we bought some stock rubber about 1/8" thick and made our own flaps. Each one hangs down 10.5" from the end of the fender and are 5" wide at the base. In the end we spent less than $5 per set for each bike and they work great!

Front mud flaps are nice and help with keeping your feet dry! Rear mud flaps are a must if plan on riding with others! Both are better the longer they are.

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Brooks Mud Flaps
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2011, 03:11:45 pm »
3.  What size drill bit (inches) do you recommend using to put holes in the fender? Or is there a better way to put the holes in the fender other     
     than drilling?
3.  The holes are 6mm in diameter, so the nearest fractional inch is 15/64 and we do not know of a better way to put the holes in.

There is a time and a place for a trashed soldering iron, and this is that time.  With a pencil tip soldering iron, you can melt a hole through plastic.  This is the best way I know to work with Cordura, and it should be an excellent way to put a hole in a plastic fender.  Getting 1/16" (just slightly larger than 15/64") will take a delicate touch, but I am sure that you can do it.  Once you use a soldering iron to melt plastic, it won't be any good for soldering, hence the moniker or a "trashed soldering iron".
Danno