Author Topic: Lewis & Clark  (Read 1673 times)

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Offline easy

Lewis & Clark
« on: December 16, 2011, 02:48:57 pm »
Just trying to decide on Northern tier or L&C this summer, both ways take me into Williston,ND. On the L&C, is there a bypass route, looks like I could veer west and cut cross and pick up the trail in Montana, has anyone done this? I will send for a state bicycle map, just curious if anyone knows a way around. Have heard bad things about the traffic in the Williston area. Thanks

Offline CMajernik

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2011, 02:54:36 pm »
We are in the process of making major changes on both the Northern Tier and Lewis & Clark routes and remapping a new route through North Dakota to avoid Williston and the area between Williston and Minot. The new Northern Tier section3 and 4 maps will be available in early May and the new Lewis & Clark section 3 and 4 maps will be available in late June.
Carla Majernik
Routes and Mapping Program Director

Adventure Cycling Association
Inspiring people of all ages to travel by bicycle.
800/755-2453, 406/721-1776 x218, 406/721-8754 fax
www.adventurecycling.org

Follow Routes & Mapping on Twitter: @acaroutes

Offline jamawani

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2011, 07:02:41 pm »
There is a MAJOR oil and gas play going on in the Williston Basin based on reserves in the Bakken geologic formation.  Gophers driving stuff to camps in pick-ups are making $25 an hour.  Skilled workers are making $50 an hour and more.  Big money everywhere - drugs, hookers, you name it.  Motels easily go for $200 a night - if you can find one.  Campgrounds are filled with semi-permanent workers.  Roads are clogged with trucks in a hurry to get to various job sites. Not ideal.

Also, Minot got hit bad by flooding last year and lacks housing, some businesses, and overall services.

The boom is centered in Williston - but stretches over much of western North Dakota and easternmost Montana.  People are commuting from as far away as Bismarck and sleeping in man camps.  (The name says it all.)

I've always disagreed with the Northern Tier route in North Dakota anyway.  It should have been vis Hwy 200 through the Knife River Indian Villages and Mandan Villages historic sites - crossing the Missouri at Washburn.  There will be some traffic on Hwy 200 related to the energy boom - just not as much as around Williston.  The only other alternative (Not using I-94) is way south on US 12 crossing th Missouri at Mobridge, SD.

Here's a map of drilling activity:
http://seekingalpha.com/instablog/1084056-richard-worley/242743-strong-production-growth-of-bakken-shale-plays

Offline jamawani

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2011, 07:23:51 pm »

Offline indyfabz

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2011, 10:36:10 am »
It should have been vis Hwy 200 through the Knife River Indian Villages and Mandan Villages historic sites - crossing the Missouri at Washburn.

Stayed in Washburn and visited Fort Mandan in '06 during CANDISC. Neat place.

Offline hem

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2011, 12:52:21 pm »
jamawani

How about through Theodore Roosevelt National Park and out the "backdoor." Is this a viable option for getting around Williston?

Offline jamawani

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2011, 11:49:25 pm »
The "backdoor" of Theodore Roosevelt N.P. (North Unit) is a great option if you are willing to do 10 miles of dirt roads.  (From ND 68 eastbound stay straight onto county road 7 miles; turn right/south 4 miles on paved county road; then left 3 miles with zigs to park) It's easier to find heading east to west than vice versa.  Also the gate is usually locked - which means lifting your bike over - usually easier to remove panniers, first.  Most importantly, you better have a map and know your directions - esp. in hot or cold weather.

Offline John Nettles

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2011, 12:15:53 am »
The "backdoor" of Theodore Roosevelt N.P. (North Unit) is a great option if you are willing to do 10 miles of dirt roads.  (From ND 68 eastbound stay straight onto county road 7 miles; turn right/south 4 miles on paved county road; then left 3 miles with zigs to park) It's easier to find heading east to west than vice versa.  Also the gate is usually locked - which means lifting your bike over - usually easier to remove panniers, first.  Most importantly, you better have a map and know your directions - esp. in hot or cold weather.

Could you be a little more specific to the directions, i.e. the starting and ending intersections or towns?  I was looking on Google and MapQuest and couldn't find the paved CR that is 7 miles east of anywhere on ND-68.  I was thinking you meant east on MT-23, south on Bennie Pierre Road/CR-202 which becomes CR-38 in ND, weaving thru the park and coming out near Grassy Butte, ND but couldn't be sure as at no point was "my" route on ND-68.

Thanks, John

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!
John

Offline jamawani

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2011, 02:45:01 am »
John -

From Sydney, MT - MT 23 becomes ND 68.
The first dirt segment begins when ND 68 turns north.
I would advise you to check with TRNP staff to see
if it is still legit to use this gate.
NPS is increasingly iffy with such things.

Offline easy

Re: Lewis & Clark
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2011, 07:03:51 pm »
Thanks for the reply's. Got to do some research, don't mind hardpacked dirt or gravel, don't like sand. Still in early planning stages. Wife and I will be going East to west on Lewis and Clark. Hope they hurry up on those new maps, want to leave mid June.