Author Topic: Rain Gear (yet again...)  (Read 3197 times)

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Offline oldgroundhog

Rain Gear (yet again...)
« on: December 20, 2011, 07:16:17 am »
A search of 'Rain Gear' provided a pletheria of ideas again for this subject.  Some prefer a basic poncho.  Others like high end GoreTex.  I've cycled with both.   Has anyone toured with 'Frogg Toggs'?

They seem cheap enough but lack of ventilation is a concern.  Summer travels will find me back in Alaska and NW Canada.  Good rain gear is a requirement there.

If I must shell out the big bucks for GoreTex, does anyone have a 'top shell' they'd recommend?   Something that has held up for several tours.

Groundhog

Offline staehpj1

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2011, 07:48:39 am »
My only comment would be that I personally do not find breathable fabrics like goretex to pass vapor anywhere near fast enough to really help much while exercising.  I sweat like crazy though, so I personally just resign myself to the fact that I will be either wet from rain or from sweat.  I just use non breathable coated nylon.  I ventilate by using the zippers to regulate temperature.  That said you and the conditions you ride in may vary greatly from me and mine.

on the Frogg Toggs...  No personal experience, but I have a friend who swears by the DriDucks® Ultra-Lite2™ Rain Suit.

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2011, 12:12:19 pm »
Like Pete, "breathable" fabrics only work for me when built with lots of vents.  Unfortunately, it seems you have to spend the money for better cycling gear to get pit zips, adjustable wrist bands, back vent, and two-way front zippers.  Showers Pass touring jacket has worked well for me for a few years' commuting, if that helps.

Offline bogiesan

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2011, 08:43:47 am »
Frogg Toggs have been a favorite inexpensive water barrier for ultralight backpackers for decades. They are usually worn in camp, though, since they are waterproof the wearer may overheat or just get soaked from the inside out.

Your OP suggests you like to ride with a poncho or, as I've seen them rigged, a riding cape. Basically a poncho that has wrist loops to hold the garment securely at the handlebars. Plenty of ventilation.

I remember when GoreTex was invented and it hit the market with a flourish; a cruel and expensive joke played upon gullible gear freaks looking for miracles. Breathable/waterproof fabrics have never performed for me at all in any sport. Save your money. It simply does not work as advertised.

You can invest in breathables if you can find suitable garments at deep, deep discounts only.

I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Joe B

  • Guest
Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2011, 10:57:05 am »
I'll second the vote for Showers Pass gear. I use the Showers Pass Touring Jacket and the Club Convertible pants with touring shoe covers when really wet.  I'll also second the vote on needing more than just breathable fabric, I find them fine in camp and actually use my touring jacket as my year round shell whether touring or not. When riding however, the pit zips, and adjustable cuffs are the most important features to me. By opening the cuffs to scoop in air  I can exit the air through the pit zips and ride comfortably all day in all but the nastiest deluge. As a slight bonus the pants don't look too "bikey" so with a nice shirt they can pass as "normal" attire.

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2011, 12:24:07 am »


I remember when GoreTex was invented and it hit the market with a flourish; a cruel and expensive joke played upon gullible gear freaks looking for miracles. Breathable/waterproof fabrics have never performed for me at all in any sport. Save your money. It simply does not work as advertised.



GoreTex has worked famously for me biking, hiking and climbing  for literally hundreds of days.   It has also worked for me in boots.  Last summer I hiked and climbed in slushy wet snow for hours in goretex boots and gaiters and had dry feet at the end of a 15 hour  20 mile day.  Anyway, as I said, GoreTex has worked for me in jackets, pants, and boots.  I have read other reports from people who said it did not work for them. Maybe it depends on the individual.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline bogiesan

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2011, 09:46:16 am »
johnson, thanks for posting your results. That's the value of resources such as these. Perhpas I need to give breathables another try, maybe the technologies have advanced. Fortunately I do not need any new gear!

I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline dkoloko

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2011, 01:05:45 pm »
I have used a number of breathable waterproof jackets with different fabrics, including Gore-Tex. I cannot say any were a waste of money. If I was buying now, I'd try eVent from good reports I've  read. If durability is paramount, consider waxed cotton, garments made for hunting and camping, where lightweight is not a consideration, and garments made for mountain climbing. Gore-Tex garments for mountaineering are apt to be made for extreme conditions, perhaps a plus to you. In conversation, Gore-Tex told me their bicycling garments are made with the expectation bicyclists will not be cycling in heavy rain (yes, I know, I have been caught in heavy rain, too). Gore-Tex also said they guarantee their garments; if a garment fails to meet your expectations, and the dealer will not refund your money or substitute a garment to your satisfaction, Gore-Tex will.

Offline PeteJack

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2011, 06:16:59 pm »
Quote
Gore-Tex also said they guarantee their garments; if a garment fails to meet your expectations, and the dealer will not refund your money or substitute a garment to your satisfaction, Gore-Tex will.

I can attest to that. I bought a GoreTex Bike Wear jacket in the UK that ended up leaking like a sieve after about a year. I sent it back (in the US) and they let me pick any jacket in their line to replace it.

Offline dkoloko

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2012, 04:47:31 pm »
In tests of waterproof shells last spring in Climbing Magazine, Sierra Designs Jive came in first for durability.

Offline pptouring

Re: Rain Gear (yet again...)
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2012, 08:56:45 pm »
I just got (yesterday) a Waterproof Breathable jacket from J&G. Initial impression out of the box is, "Wow! Very nice looking jacket!" and the label reads, "Made In Oregon" How cool is that? We'll see how well it works when I'm commuting or touring with it the next time it rains. Stay tuned!