Author Topic: UK Rider. Recommendations.  (Read 3896 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Fred Hiltz

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2012, 08:43:19 pm »
Local cyclists, sure, but definitely not local motorists. We all have stories of "just a coupla miles, on the level" that turn out to be a one-hour push with 300 meters climbed.

Fred

Offline simplicity

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2012, 05:25:18 am »
Quote
ha, the one thing i would wholeheartedly recommend NOT doing in the states, is following the locals directions and recommendations!!!  You'll see........ :D

Fair point  :D. Does the community have any basic tips for developing a route along the way (rough route will be in mind)? Recommended maps (enough detail to distinguish smaller, cycle friendly roads)? Useful websites? Are the local tourism posts worth visiting for information?

I am intending to buy ACA maps for portions of my trip, but for the first leg; south from Charleston, SC; I will probably just look to cycle in a northern direction, staying away from heavily urbanized areas. Again, can anybody recommend a way for me to box up my bike and ship to LAX a few weeks early, if I did decide to explore portions of the southwest (north rim) on foot. This would allow me to then bus it back to LAX, pick up my boxed bike and fly home from there?










 
« Last Edit: January 17, 2012, 05:32:47 am by simplicity »

Offline DanE

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2012, 08:30:48 am »
If you are up to the challenge, I would recommend riding through North Carolina and Virginia on the Blue Ridge Parkway and Skyline Drive. These are maintained by the National Park Service and run continuously for about 575 miles and cover almost the entire distance of the two states when  traveling north to south. No navigation is really needed and campgrounds are spaced just about the right distance apart. The terrain is difficult and takes you over the highest mountains on the east coast. It's as good as you will find for bicycle touring I believe anywhere.

Offline JMilyko

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2012, 08:50:33 am »
Quote
ha, the one thing i would wholeheartedly recommend NOT doing in the states, is following the locals directions and recommendations!!!  You'll see........ :D

Fair point  :D. Does the community have any basic tips for developing a route along the way (rough route will be in mind)? Recommended maps (enough detail to distinguish smaller, cycle friendly roads)? Useful websites? Are the local tourism posts worth visiting for information?

I am intending to buy ACA maps for portions of my trip, but for the first leg; south from Charleston, SC; I will probably just look to cycle in a northern direction, staying away from heavily urbanized areas. Again, can anybody recommend a way for me to box up my bike and ship to LAX a few weeks early, if I did decide to explore portions of the southwest (north rim) on foot. This would allow me to then bus it back to LAX, pick up my boxed bike and fly home from there?

To determine routes off the Adventure Cycling Route Network, check with the state bicycle and pedestrian coordinators. You can find contact info and links to their web resources here:

http://www.walkinginfo.org/assistance/contacts.cfm

.Jennifer.
*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*_*

Jennifer H. Milyko
Adventure Cycling Association
Inspiring and empowering people to travel by bicycle.
800/755-2453, 406/721-1776 x205
www.adventurecycling.org

Follow Routes & Mapping on Twitter: @acaroutes

Offline simplicity

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2012, 12:09:34 pm »
Thanks for the link Jennifer, I will get onto emailing the desired states within the next few weeks.

Just to get your final opinions on my route...

Route: (12th April - 3rd August)
Flying into Charleston, SC
North through NC, VA and PA.
Northern Route across IL, IA, NE (OR) MO, KN
Trans Am route CO, WY, MO... onwards.
Northwest Coast to Santa Cruz.
Travel inland and explore Southwest (Hike the North Rim).
Bus/Train to LAX to fly out.

Can the community see any major issues with the proposed route? Weather permitting; I am hoping to achieve this in 112 days:-\

Thanks in advance

Online staehpj1

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2012, 01:07:03 pm »
"but keeping it open enough to improvise and follow locals recommendations and directions. "

ha, the one thing i would wholeheartedly recommend NOT doing in the states, is following the locals directions and recommendations!!!  You'll see........ :D
+1 on that except for truck drivers.  We found professional truckers to usually be very reliable sources of detailed and accurate route info.  Other drivers, definitely take with a grain of salt.

Offline jamawani

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2012, 10:05:17 pm »
Just a quick note about the Carolinas and Virginia. 
(Used to live in Chapel Hill - The Southern part of heaven.)
Althought the Blue Ridge Parkway is lovely, April may be a bit early.
Also, it goes southwest to northeast and you will be trending southeast to northwest.

Much of the immediate coastal area has been built up - condos and golf courses.
To find traditional coastal environments and communities, you have to be inland a bit.
One exception to this is the part of ther Outer Banks protected as National Seashore.
Also, azaleas and other spring flowers will be in bloom.

Some places to consider:
Georgetown, SC - historic with colonial architecture

Okracoke Island, NC on the Outer Banks.
Lovely rides out to ferry at Cedar Island and back to Swan Quarter.
Somerset Plantation on Phelps Lake right next to Pettigrew State Park - camping.
(One of the finest examples of antebellum plantation with preserved slave quarters.)
(Many plantations ignore the rather significant contribution of slaves.)
Edenton is a lovely colonial town on the water - much quieter than Williamsburg.
Merchant's Millpond State Park has rental canoes - can canoe thru cypress swamps.

The Southside of Virginia has great back roads - usually numbered in the 600s and 700s.
Most have very light traffic - although services may be scant.
I would avoid the Norfolk and Richmond areas - really tough to ride thru.
High Bridge State Trail is a possibility - the bridge itself is supposed to open soon.
Maybe head west of there - roughly Courtland to Charlottesville.
If you want to hit a Civil War site - Appomattox is close.
Charlottesville is home to Unive of Va and Monticello - Jefferson's home.

Ocracoke Island, Somerset, and Edenton would give you an excellent feel for the coastal South.
And some of the routes are surprisingly remote for the East Coast.
A few older people on the Outer Banks still speak Hoi Toider - due to former isolation.
Video on this page - http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/4811

Feel free to send me any direct questions.

Best - J

Offline mcmoonter

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2012, 04:18:34 pm »
I'm a Scot who rode the TransAm last summer, I think the route will be right up your street. I would say that leaving in April you will need to be prepared for poor weather starting on the east coast that early. There may well still be snow on the Colorado and Oregon high passes. Dont ditch tour cold weather gear in Kansas!

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/8912
« Last Edit: January 22, 2012, 04:21:35 pm by mcmoonter »

Offline VeloVeg

Re: UK Rider. Recommendations.
« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2012, 11:06:21 am »
Just a couple thoughts on your proposed route. In Wyoming, Lander is a great little town. You can camp at the town park along the river (free). It is home to the National Outdoor Leadership School and there's a vibrant feel to the town. Good food at the Gannet Grill.

Good homemade pie at Dubois.

When you descend Togwotee Pass and catch your first glimpse of the Teton Mts., don't be tempted to blow past them in a rush to get to Yellowstone. Spend at least an extra day. Camp a couple nights at Signal Mtn. (hiker/biker sites $5.00). Good food at nearby lodge/restaurant. Next morning ride your unloaded bike 10-miles down to Jenny Lake and hike up to Inspiration Point or beyond. Ride back to Signal Mtn. Enjoy more good food. Walk along Jackson Lake and stare at the mountains in amazement. Next morning--now you can ride up to Yellowstone.

You'd need a week to see Yellowstone by bike. The Trans Am route gives you a little taste around the southwest portion of the park. At least you'll see Old Faithful.

Now, when riding down the Pacific coast, I would definitely recommend riding further south than Santa Cruz. After all, how can one read Steinbeck and not visit Monterey and Cannery Row, not to mention the gorgeous views along Big Sur? I might suggest riding south to Santa Barbara (or even as far as Santa Monica). There is a convenient hostel in Santa Barbara across from the Amtrak station. SB is a great town to walk around or by bike. (There is also a good hostel in San Luis Obispo and Santa Monica--just up from the beach.)

You said "hike the North Rim". Although the North Rim is my favorite side of the canyon, I don't think there is public transport there. The South Rim is the touristy side, with train and bus service. You will still get a nice taste of the canyon on the South Rim. Just make sure you hike down into the canyon. Awesome!

If you are planning to hike the North Rim, then I would highly recommend that you also visit nearby Zion NP. (There is public transportation in and out of St. George, Utah.) Zion park is very bike friendly, with a free shuttle from the nearby town and throughout the park. Also, cars aren't allowed in the park except for the campground and lodge. If you have the opportunity, be sure to hike Angel's Landing and The Narrows. Excellent!

I think you're gong to have an amazing adventure!

Many safe journeys,

Ted
www.bikewithamission.org