Author Topic: Couple of Questions re dates of change  (Read 804 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline tonythomson

Couple of Questions re dates of change
« on: January 10, 2012, 02:28:30 pm »
Just curious but does anyone know
1. when 700c wheel size was first introduced
2. when did manufacturers stop putting the gear changers on the tube from the head tube to the bottom bracket

Just wondered as these things seem to happen without me noticing  ???
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline DaveB

Re: Couple of Questions re dates of change
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2012, 05:54:21 pm »
1.  700c dates back to the early 20th century French wheels sizing when there were 700A, 700B and 700C size wheels and tires, all different.   In the late 1950's and early 1960's the European Tire and Rim Technical Organization (ETRTO) finally rationalized a huge range of inconsistant tire and rim designations by defining rims by their bead seat diameter in mm and tires by their bead seat diameter and section width.  ETRTO defined the 700c rim as 622 mm bsd and matching tires as 622xXX where XX was the width in mm.   ERTRO definitions later were adopted by the International Standards Organization (ISO) and you will see tires and rims by their ISO definition these days. 

2.  Downtube shifters have never completely gone away but are increasing rare since combined brake/shifter (aka brifters) appeared in the late 1980's.  Barend shifters have been around well before that. 

Offline indyfabz

Re: Couple of Questions re dates of change
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2012, 01:30:57 pm »
the European Tire and Rim Technical Organization (ETRTO)

Heh. I'll bet their annual convention is off the hook. And it brings to mind the review of a book tracing the history of the spoke nipple that appeared in an April edition of "Adventure Cyclist" many years ago. It was a joke, but I and, according to AC, numerous others fell for it.

Offline DaveB

Re: Couple of Questions re dates of change
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2012, 02:30:57 pm »
Yeah,  I remember a couple of AC's April issue "Product" descriptions that did indeed fool some people.  Sheldon Brown's web site also had an annual April 1 article describing some outrageous new product and, i believe Harris Cyclery has continued the tradition.

That said, ETRTO (and later ISO) is no joke and did a wonderful job of bringing order and uniformity to the chaos that used to be bicycle rim and tire sizes and nomenclature.  Every time you buy a bike tire and it fits the rim you have, be grateful for what they did.