Author Topic: Long distance trip alone?  (Read 11227 times)

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Offline DaveB

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #30 on: March 08, 2012, 10:37:23 am »
The benefit of the metal chain is that it's not going to get cut and lost if the EMS people have to cut off your shirt or jersey after an accident. 
A close friend of mine is an EMT and he stated that they are explicitly trained to check for medical alert items, be they dog tags, wrist straps, ankle straps, or shoe tags. It seems excessively remote that an EMS/EMT would cut off my RoadID. Dog tags, even with silencers make noise and are pretty annoying when in the drops. A RoadID is pretty inert and inconspicuous.
My point about the metal bead chain was that it is cut resistant where a dog tag on a piece of string would not be.  I do know of a rider hurt in a bike crash whose dog tag was on a ribbon around her neck and was lost when the EMTs cut off her jersey to treat a shoulder injury so they never saw it. 


Offline Shane

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #31 on: March 09, 2012, 03:20:52 pm »
Dont travel alone for too long, strange things happen  8)

http://vimeo.com/34943524

Offline tonythomson

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #32 on: March 10, 2012, 04:56:29 am »
Dont travel alone for too long, strange things happen  8)

http://vimeo.com/34943524

Wonderful. Know where your coming from, I have the most out of tune singing voice ever, so I can do my X factor bit as loud as I like o those wonderful empty stretches.  :-X
Just starting to record my trips  www.tonystravels.com

Offline Shane

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #33 on: March 10, 2012, 09:15:43 am »
Dont travel alone for too long, strange things happen  8)

http://vimeo.com/34943524

Wonderful. Know where your coming from, I have the most out of tune singing voice ever, so I can do my X factor bit as loud as I like o those wonderful empty stretches.  :-X

Something like this? 

http://vimeo.com/38267462a

 8)

Offline WesternFlyer

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #34 on: March 10, 2012, 10:53:01 pm »
My point about the metal bead chain was that it is cut resistant where a dog tag on a piece of string would not be.  I do know of a rider hurt in a bike crash whose dog tag was on a ribbon around her neck and was lost when the EMTs cut off her jersey to treat a shoulder injury so they never saw it.


I have a little true story to relate that relates to long distance solo riding and most any other of life’s activities.  Last year I made a trip to the ER related to a chronic heart problem (not bike related). After four hours of tests and being stripped down to a flimsy hospital gown I was wheeled into MRI room.  Of course I was asked if I was wearing any metal.  I pulled out my medic alert tag on its stainless steel chain.  The charge nurse turned a ghostly shade of pale.  I had been wearing this tag around my neck day and night for over ten years just for this day and it failed.

When I was discharged and got home, I decided at this point in my life it was appropriate to wear my heart on my sleeve.  I ordered a bright red Road ID wristband and have worn it every day since both on and off the road.

And I pretty much ride exclusively solo, often in remote places, up to six weeks at a time and love it.

Western Flyer


Western Flyer

We must ride light and swift.  It is a long road ahead.

King Theoden

Offline RussSeaton

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #35 on: March 11, 2012, 03:45:44 pm »
I pulled out my medic alert tag on its stainless steel chain.  The charge nurse turned a ghostly shade of pale.  I had been wearing this tag around my neck day and night for over ten years just for this day and it failed.

When I was discharged and got home, I decided at this point in my life it was appropriate to wear my heart on my sleeve.  I ordered a bright red Road ID wristband and have worn it every day since both on and off the road.

Not saying it did not happen as you describe it.  But based on my numerous experiences, I have a hard time believing it did happen as you describe it.  I've had Medic Alert necklaces and bracelets on for about 30+ years now.  Dozens upon dozens of times they have been used.  I don't recall them ever not being found by the treating paramedic or policeman or even citizens/passersby.  When you are lieing unconscious, people automatically look for the Medic Alert necklace and bracelet.  The necklace is found more often than the bracelet and the necklace is the first thing they look for.  Medic Alert stainless steel necklaces and bracelets are known/recognized by everyone, everyone, everyone.  Whereas the Road ID thing is unknown by everyone.  Its just a piece of costume jewelry.  Looks like one of those decorative Armstrong wrist bands.

Offline WesternFlyer

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #36 on: March 12, 2012, 01:30:27 pm »
Russ

It did happen as I wrote, but not exactly as you have assumed.  I was not picked up unconscious on the street by EMTs.  I was driven conscious to the hospital by my daughter.  The ER had access to all my medical records without accessing my medic tag.  I suppose this bit of information proves your point to you, but just a certainly it proves my point to me.  Just doing a quick search I noticed American Medical ID now offers bright colorful wristbands quite similar in style and function to the Road ID.

http://www.americanmedical-id.com/marketplace/category_viewall.php?bbmetalgroup=&filter_price=&scrollcat=brac_siliconeflex&mastercategory=bracelets

May we all be safe on the road.

Western Flyer
Western Flyer

We must ride light and swift.  It is a long road ahead.

King Theoden

Offline RussSeaton

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #37 on: March 12, 2012, 01:55:35 pm »
The extra information changes it quite a bit.  I can't imagine why any emergency room personnel would search a conscious person for a Medic Alert or Road ID or anything else if they were conscious and you could just talk to them and ask them what was wrong and why they were there.  As you orignally described it the emergency room personnel did not seem to know why they were treating you.  That is a case of bad diagnosis or not looking at the medical records they had on you.  100% unrelated to you wearing an emergency ID.  Why look for an emergency ID on your body if they can just talk to you and ask you to pull out your drivers license and insurance card?  The medical ID is for identification and making people aware of a medical condition when the person is unable to provide that information.  The colorful pretty Road ID is not going to be used/found/looked for if the police/ambulance can talk to you.

Offline John Nelson

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #38 on: March 12, 2012, 03:51:30 pm »
I use MEDS. Various bicycle events give them away for free.

http://www.meds.org/bikehelmet.php

I understand that medical personnel are trained to look for them.

Offline mucknort

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #39 on: March 12, 2012, 05:16:21 pm »
I know this isn't advancing the discussion, but I read the thread title and shuddered. I love long distance touring, but have absolutely 0 interest in EVER doing it alone. To me, sharing the experience with one or more humans is an absolute essential and pleasure and makes the journey all the better. To me, bike touring solo would be the perfect mix of heaven and hell: bike touring (heaven) and doing it solo (hell). I wish those of you that are hard-wired to do it solo all the best!
« Last Edit: March 12, 2012, 05:18:34 pm by mucknort »

Offline jrswenberger

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #40 on: March 12, 2012, 08:26:54 pm »
I use MEDS. Various bicycle events give them away for free.

http://www.meds.org/bikehelmet.php

I understand that medical personnel are trained to look for them.

Not to get too far off the topic, but...as a registered nurse and a first responder, I've never even heard of this.

Jay
ACA Life Member 368

Offline WesternFlyer

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #41 on: March 14, 2012, 07:08:53 pm »
The extra information changes it quite a bit.

Your conclusions are rational, logical and well stated.  Please allow that for a few of us life does not appear entirely rational and logical, especially in emergencies.  So perhaps you can wear your stainless steel amulet draped around your neck and I my polyurethane talisman clasped to my wrist and we can both ride with some degree of providential protection. 

Western Flyer
Western Flyer

We must ride light and swift.  It is a long road ahead.

King Theoden

Offline Ike

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #42 on: March 15, 2012, 11:43:38 am »
It is very interesting to read about why some people would never tour alone, because this contrasts completely with my own preference--I always tour alone.

Solo bicycle tours and backpacking trips, for me, are an important means to recharge my mental batteries. My chosen career often brings me in contact with many, many people and I need time away from humans. However, on a bike tour, unless I was riding in an extremely remote area, I have never really been completely alone. There are always people around and many are interested in the journey. Finding people to talk to isn't difficult if you are a normally social person.

I tend to be fairly introverted anyway, so my conversations with strangers normally don't go very far. Feelings of loneliness will happen if you are traveling solo, so it can be important to make sure your mind is occupied. Keeping a detailed journal, reading, and nature observation are all vital activities that help keep my solo tours enjoyable. Without those activities, my evenings could easily become boring and lonely.

Touring alone is safe and fun. I wouldn't do it if my experiences told me otherwise.

Offline sonssu

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #43 on: March 16, 2012, 01:59:27 am »
It's never a stupid idea. I would send you the props and shout out a good luck for you. Just make sure your muscle won't get injured during a long distance ride because if you get injured that's where real saga starts.

Offline tjse25

Re: Long distance trip alone?
« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2012, 08:55:11 pm »
I been planning a 800+ trip this July, from South Dakota to Michigan. It never crossed my mind about finding a partner, the plan was to start alone if I find a riding buddie it will be bonus.