Author Topic: Pacing on a long distance ride  (Read 3545 times)

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Offline mikefm58

Pacing on a long distance ride
« on: February 05, 2012, 06:21:49 am »
What kind of pacing do you folks use on your long rides?  I realize everyone is different.  On my weekend rides I never am on the bike more than 2 hours without a 15-30 minutes rest.

Offline Ed_in_Maine

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2012, 07:17:36 am »
I've found monitoring my heart rate does the trick for me.

Offline DaveB

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2012, 09:04:19 am »
On century rides, the food stops are typically at about 25 mile intervals and those are the logical breaks.  On my own 30 - 40 mile rides I tend to do the whole thing straight through with nothing but  fast "Porta Potty" stops as required.

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2012, 09:21:23 am »
For long rides (which for me is 60-100 miles) I go out at a comfortable pace, draft with a partner as much as we can, and drink a lot of water.  Eating a lot during the ride does not help, but I eat small amounts when hungry.  The key for me is not trying to go too fast, especially early in the ride.  I'm 63 and have adjusted the pace (slower) in the past 10 years.  I love riding around all day, but don't really care how far I go. 
May the wind be at your back!

Offline mikefm58

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2012, 06:23:18 am »
We're at about the same level John, I'm 53 so I know how important it is to pace yourself.  I did back to back 40 mile rides this past weekend, with a 15-20 minute rest and snack at the 27 mile mark.  The legs felt really strong from start to finish, even stronger on Sunday, so that is promising.  I'm going to work up to back to back 80 mile rides, just to see if my body can handle it without too much difficulty.  My typical weekend ride is a non-stop 25-35 mile ride, so anything over 40 is pushing my usual boundaries.

Did you have any days that were a complete rest?  My plans are to start out within my limits and then go as much as I feel my body can take it.  But I'd love to be able to get up a 100 mile daily ride.

Offline bogiesan

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2012, 06:42:13 am »
What kind of pacing do you folks use on your long rides?  I realize everyone is different.  On my weekend rides I never am on the bike more than 2 hours without a 15-30 minutes rest.

That may be comfortble for you because you are different. Are you happy with that ratio of time in the saddle/time on your feet? ONe of the better things about touring on a bike is being able to get off whenever it pleases to rest, take pictures, look over the edge, stretch, visit, fuel up.
My recumbent is comfotable enough to ride much longer between rest and recovery pauses but my riding partner was always stopping for something and, as much in his honor as almost hearing him, I stop a lot more often than I think is necessary.

I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline johnsondasw

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2012, 12:48:39 pm »


Did you have any days that were a complete rest?  My plans are to start out within my limits and then go as much as I feel my body can take it.  But I'd love to be able to get up a 100 mile daily ride.
7 years ago I rode the Pacific Coast, average 72 mpd for 20 days straight.  We took a "kind of " rest day in Santa Cruz and rode around town some.  Our longest day was 116 miles.  We were hauling gear in Burley Nomad trailers.  A year later i rode the STP group ride Seattle to Portland in one day and did 208 miles.  In both of these cases, I think I did a little more than I should have.  I did not feel good for some time afterwards.  However, it turned out I had a heart rhythm problem then and did not know it.  I now have a pacemaker.  In any case, I think I wouold enjoy long distance touring more at a 50-60 mpd pace now and take take a day a week or so completely off.  Despite always staying in great shape, when I go on climbing or biking trips with my sons and nephews (half my age) I realize how much I've lost.  But  for me the key is to still be out there doing it!  I actually enjoy these activities more now than I ever did--not competitive any more, enjoy the social nature of exercise as much as the physical part.
May the wind be at your back!

Offline Gif4445

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2012, 03:32:03 pm »
Everybody is different, but for me, I have to resist the temptation to go from point A to point B as fast as possible.  My most enjoyable days touring are when I stop more frequently than I feel I should, and talk with locals, see the sights, smell the roses etc.  And actually those turn out to be my most productive days mileage wise.  It probably holds me back a little and I don't burn out too early in the day.

Offline VeloVeg

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2012, 12:58:45 pm »
+1. What Gif4445 said. It's not about the destination - it's about the journey.

I could fairly easily ride 100+ miles everyday, but I don't. I usually ride 50 to 75 per day and take time to meet and greet locals, walk around quaint towns, stop for pie, take plenty of photos, and stop for pie. I always take (at least) one day off the bike per week. I take time to hike the national parks, visit local museums and historical sites, wildlife preserves, etc. If the weather forecast is for all-day-rain, then I'll stay put and enjoy a good book (Kindle/Nook), poke around the campsite, walk around town, visit the library, etc. Of course, if I get caught in an afternoon shower, then that's just part of the journey! Anyway, you'll relish your trip much more if you aren't destination orientated, but instead, enjoy the journey one stroke of the pedals at a time.

Many safe journeys,

Ted

Offline MrBent

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2012, 06:40:38 pm »
I'm with VeloVeg on this one.  For me, too many miles per day turns the tour into a job, although some people seem to love the huge miles.  I'm right in Velo's range when I tour.  My typical day riding across the country was 65 miles.  On a few occasions I had 75--85 mile days but only when I had really high energy and just want to put on the miles.  It felt good to hammer.  Maybe some people feel this way all the time, but not me.  Hanging out, talking to people, long easy lunches to dig the scene, slow mornings with coffee when it's cold, these are absolutely part of the joy of bicycle travel.  Most people I talk to who did big rides with big miles think it was a mistake and would slow down next time.  Some on this board never take rest days.   Again, to me bike touring is not always about riding.   I had so many great layover days!  Usually about once a week.  My longest  push during my cross country ride was about eleven or twelve days.  That felt LONG.  But I was pushing for a big layover spot at a family member's house where I stayed for three days.  Sweet.

Scott

Offline Shane

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2012, 01:27:57 pm »
If I'm hungry, thirsty, tired, have a sore arse or want to take a photo I stop. If not then I dont  ;D

I doubt this is something that can be compared. During cycle touring I've cycled between 3 and 125 miles in one day and anything up to 14 hours to do it :) And sometimes i just stop after an hour and go back to bed if it isn't my day :)

Offline awbikes

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2012, 06:51:47 pm »
As can be seen from the variety of responses this is a popular topic. I have found the primary consideration is your level of fitness. It always amazes me how as a trip wears on you become noticeably stronger and how quickly your body adapts. I think the best rule of thumb is to allow your body to tell you what it can endure and put out. Mind over matter will work in the short run but then reality kicks in. One rule that seems to work for me as far as distance or time in the saddle is, whatever distance you normally ride day to day you can add 1/3 to it without pushing your limits. It is interesting how dead on this seems for my wife and I.

Offline MrBent

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2012, 04:11:09 pm »
Tim Travis once said something like: "I'm not going to let riding the bike get in the way of this tour!"  That's a rough paraphrase but spot on with his sentiment. 

Words of wisdom, Lloyd, words of wisdom.

Scott

Offline Ron Scott

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2012, 04:56:38 am »
Whether I'm riding 20 miles or a century I stop for 2-3 minutes every 10 miles for a drink and a quick stretch. On longer rides I try not to stop for more than 15 minutes or so for lunch. Long stops can be hurt since restarting is like starting from scratch.

Offline staehpj1

Re: Pacing on a long distance ride
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2012, 08:18:19 am »
My most enjoyable days touring are when I stop more frequently than I feel I should, and talk with locals, see the sights, smell the roses etc.  And actually those turn out to be my most productive days mileage wise.
That has been my experience as well.  I really do not get the notion that riding high-ish mileage precludes "smelling the roses".