Author Topic: Chain repair  (Read 3988 times)

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Offline HONDO

Chain repair
« on: September 06, 2012, 02:24:56 pm »
Novice question: I have a 9 speed shimano cassett. If my chain breaks can I replace that link with a master link or do I need a replacement link ? Any special specs? 3/32 ?  Advice welcomed.

Offline cgarch

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2012, 02:39:57 pm »
Is it a Shimano chain or ? Need that info. If it's a Shimano 9 speed, then you can use a spare link and new link pins - PITA. If it's a SRAM then you can probably use a master link, but then it depends what breaks. My preference is for the SRAM chains as it is fairly straightforward to replace links. And I always carry spare chunks of chain for this reason.

Craig

Offline John Nelson

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2012, 04:35:54 pm »
Carry two master link pairs (ones compatible with your chain), a chain breaker tool and a short length of chain (perhaps 3 to 6 links). This should enable you to fix most problems. If the chain gets mangled bad enough, you'll need the extra links.

In the last 60,000 miles, I've never had a chain break.

Offline briwasson

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2012, 07:06:08 pm »
I've used SRAM master links with Shimano 9-speed chains for several years with no problems. Officially you are supposed to use the Shimano one-time use pins when rejoining a chain, but I never use them.

By the way, I use the setup above on both my single touring bikes as well as my tandem and triplet, all run with wide-range gearing and a lot of stress, especially on the tandem and triplet.

Offline DaveB

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2012, 09:34:44 pm »
With Shimano 9-speed chains you can use either SRAM, KMC or Wippermann master links in the matching width.  The other brands I mention all come with master links anyway.

Like John Nelson, I've never broken a chain in over 165,000 road miles but it can happen and I've repaired a couple of other rider's chains after a mishap.  Always carry a couple of master links or Shimano joining pins and a small chain tool. 

Offline RussSeaton

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2012, 10:49:35 pm »
On Labor Day I replaced a master link in a guy's chain.  I always carry a chain tool and 9 spd and 10 spd master links.  Did not need the chain tool on Labor Day.  Apparently just the master link came out.  I've broken a rear derailleur hanger and had to turn the bike into a single speed with the chain tool.  Any 9 speed master links will work in any 9 speed chain.  Any 10 speed master links will work in any 10 speed chains.  Brand of chain and master link is unimportant.  Any new modern chain tool (Park for example) will break any 9 or 10 speed chains.

Offline DaveB

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2012, 08:22:35 am »
Any 9 speed master links will work in any 9 speed chain.  Any 10 speed master links will work in any 10 speed chains.  Brand of chain and master link is unimportant.  Any new modern chain tool (Park for example) will break any 9 or 10 speed chains.
The first sentence is correct, any make 9-speed link will work on any make 9-speed chain.  The second isn't quite.  KMC and Wippermann 10-speed  links will work on 10-speed Shimano chains but are a bit loose on 10-speed SRAM and Campy chains.  SRAM 10-speed links are a too snug fit on other makes except for SRAM and Campy chains. 

Offline briwasson

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2012, 09:37:48 am »
For anyone who uses master links, I highly recommend getting  a Park MLP-1C tool for home use. It makes removal so much easier than doing it with just your hands.

http://www.parktool.com/product/master-link-pliers-mlp-1

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2012, 10:41:42 am »
For anyone who uses master links, I highly recommend getting  a Park MLP-1C tool for home use. It makes removal so much easier than doing it with just your hands.

http://www.parktool.com/product/master-link-pliers-mlp-1

I've never needed anything more than a pair of normal pliers, even for cruddy chains and links.  Grab some slack, arrange the master link to stand proud with 90 degree angles, open the pliers to grab opposing corners of the master link (not the corners with the enlarged holes), and squeeze.  Takes longer to get the pliers out of the toolbox than it does to open the link (and longer still to describe the process!).

Offline tsteven4

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2012, 06:16:37 pm »
A piece of string works pretty well, although it may take 3 hands, one for each end of the string and one to squeeze.  This chain was clean, but in my experience it works well with old dirty chains as well.


Offline PeteJack

Re: Chain repair
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2012, 08:16:17 am »
Here's a trick for removing Quicklinks that appeared in the CTC magazine some time ago that works a treat and requires no tools. Put the chain on your big ring with the Quicklink at the 2 o' clock position. Move the chain below the link up one tooth so the Quicklink and the next link make a Vee. Tap the side of the poking up Quicklink nearest you with something hard (e.g. a wrench, a stone) The link will instantly separate no matter how grungy it is. I've done this a bunch of times and it always works.

I'd send a picture but my camera was stolen on my last tour.