Author Topic: Tire Pressure  (Read 2418 times)

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Offline Bob Guercio

Tire Pressure
« on: October 22, 2012, 02:36:45 pm »
Hi All,

I just purchased a Schwinn bicycle from the Voyageur 2 series and the tire pressure noted on the tires should be 44 to 73 psi.  All my riding is done on paved streets.  Considering that, could you please recommend a more exact pressure for my tires?

Thanks in advance,

Bob

Offline adventurepdx

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Re: Tire Pressure
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2012, 02:40:32 pm »
I'm no expert, but my advice would be to keep the pressure on the high side of that range if you're riding on paved streets.

If you want something more exact, check this out:
http://www.biketinker.com/tire-pressure-calculator/

Offline rifleman3353

Re: Tire Pressure
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2012, 06:57:28 pm »
I've got Continental  Travel contacts max psi is 85.I go 90

Offline driftlessregion

Re: Tire Pressure
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2012, 09:26:53 pm »
Here is one expert's take on tire pressure: http://www.bikequarterly.com/images/BQTireDrop.pdf

Offline Bike Hermit

Re: Tire Pressure
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2012, 11:20:02 am »
Here is one expert's take on tire pressure: http://www.bikequarterly.com/images/BQTireDrop.pdf
hmmmm, I just re-read that article and realized that front tire pressure and rear tire pressure can/should be different. My linear way of thinking made me miss that. I've always been careful to have equal pressure in both tires. Must experiment.

Offline MNRider

Re: Tire Pressure
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2012, 06:03:49 am »
Yes, tire pressure can be different front and back and can/should reflect weight distribution. What you want to shoot for is roughly equal tire drop while riding so that your traction characteristics are about even or slightly favor the front. If you fill the tires equally within their recommended range and then load the back more heavily, the rear contact patch will be larger than the front which will affect handling and could contribute to a dangerous front wheel slideout on a wet corner. Granted the difference wouldn't be huge but when you are pushing your luck on a wet downhill corner, every little bit helps.

OP
The exact tire pressure you want will depend on a number of factors; your weight, riding style, load, and your preferred balance between rolling resistance and traction/comfort. Higher pressures allow a tire to roll easier at the cost of some traction and ability to absorb road vibration and small bumps. Excessively low pressures increase the chance of pinch flats.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2012, 06:17:56 am by MNRider »
Those who say it can't be done should stand aside for those who are doing it

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Tire Pressure
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2012, 11:48:11 am »
If you fill the tires equally within their recommended range and then load the back more heavily, the rear contact patch will be larger than the front which will affect handling and could contribute to a dangerous front wheel slideout on a wet corner. Granted the difference wouldn't be huge but when you are pushing your luck on a wet downhill corner, every little bit helps.

No doubt I'm an old fuddy-duddy who's a chicken, but I really, really try not to do such things when touring.  I'll admit some of that's based on experience, when I was stupid going downhill from Haysi, VA, around a corner in the rain.  When I got the bike under control, I was fully aware of the traffic density, housing density, and distance to a medical facility.  Since then, I've tried to take the downhills easy enough that I felt like I could slow or stop well before I was in the danger zone.  At least while touring.

Offline MNRider

Re: Tire Pressure
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2012, 09:14:04 pm »
Quote
Since then, I've tried to take the downhills easy enough that I felt like I could slow or stop well before I was in the danger zone.  At least while touring.

Very wise but sometimes you don't get a choice, like when an inexperienced rider swerves in front of you or you have to dodge an unforseen obstacle.  Even when you are trying to be careful, circumstances will occasionally arise that make you glad for every bit of traction and handling you have. 
Those who say it can't be done should stand aside for those who are doing it

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: Tire Pressure
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2012, 08:52:29 am »
Very wise but sometimes you don't get a choice, like when an inexperienced rider swerves in front of you or you have to dodge an unforseen obstacle.

I'll have to take your word for it, as I've never experienced tire traction as the limiting factor when dodging something -- it's always been my reflexes and bike handling skills.