Bicycle Travel > Gear Talk

shifters

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Rick.in.AZ:
Interesting, but pricey.  My 7 speed STI level died so i just bought some NOS shimano 105 down tube levers for about $30.  Franly, i adapted back in minutes.  I doubt i'll bother with STI again.

johnsondasw:

--- Quote from: staehpj1 on November 29, 2012, 06:18:22 am ---
--- Quote from: johnsondasw on November 28, 2012, 10:33:08 pm ---I had STI type Campy shifters partially break on the first day of a 3 week tour on the Pacific Coast.  Guess what--no one carries Campy stuff along the route.  I rode with this hassle from Olympia WA to Santa Cruz Calif and was able to get them fixed there because we had parts mailed ahead and my partner was a mechanic.  I vowed never to go with Campy stuff again.  Had it been Shimano, I could have had it up and running in the first town I came to.

--- End quote ---
Why didn't you just mount a down tube shifter or even a stem shifter temporarily.  If you have a frame that won't accomodate a down tube shifter you could probably mount one somewhere (bar, stem, or even seat post).  Most shops would have something cheap that would allow you to get along for the rest of the tour.  It could even be something from their junk bin.

--- End quote ---

Well that was the plan, mount one on the down tube.  The partially broken ones were stil "kinda" working--the gears would slip sometimes, especially going up hills.  We were all ready to do the mount and were planning to do it in camp one evening.  That day my partner's shifter broke completely, so he needed it more than I did.  We were then able to get my real fix done two days later.

DaveB:

--- Quote from: Rick.in.AZ on November 29, 2012, 09:14:18 pm ---Interesting, but pricey.  My 7 speed STI level died so i just bought some NOS shimano 105 down tube levers for about $30.  Franly, i adapted back in minutes.  I doubt i'll bother with STI again.
--- End quote ---
How "necessary" STI/Ergo levers (and Retroshifts) are depends on the terrain you ride in.  In flat to moderately rolling areas where shifting is infrequent and you have plenty of warning when a shift is needed, downtube or barends are no problem at all.  In very hilly areas, the ability to shift quickly and without taking your hands off the hoods can be priceless.   .   

Yes, high line STIs and Ergos are expensive but a lot of worthwhile things are expensive.  If cost is a big factor, Retroshifts are less expensive than brifters and a one time purchase since the any downtube or barend lever can be installed on the same base.  Worn out levers or if you want to "upgrade" to a different number of speeds only requires replacing the shift levers, not the entire unit.   

Sure, we got by with downtube shifters and barends in the past when there was nothing else available but there are good reasons why brifters now dominate the market and it's not just marketing hype.     

staehpj1:

--- Quote from: DaveB on November 30, 2012, 07:27:19 am ---How "necessary" STI/Ergo levers (and Retroshifts) are depends on the terrain you ride in.  In flat to moderately rolling areas where shifting is infrequent and you have plenty of warning when a shift is needed, downtube or barends are no problem at all.  In very hilly areas, the ability to shift quickly and without taking your hands off the hoods can be priceless.   .   

Yes, high line STIs and Ergos are expensive but a lot of worthwhile things are expensive.  If cost is a big factor, Retroshifts are less expensive than brifters and a one time purchase since the any downtube or barend lever can be installed on the same base.  Worn out levers or if you want to "upgrade" to a different number of speeds only requires replacing the shift levers, not the entire unit.   

Sure, we got by with downtube shifters and barends in the past when there was nothing else available but there are good reasons why brifters now dominate the market and it's not just marketing hype.     

--- End quote ---

I generally agree with that and like brifters a lot, but on the other hand I will say that I rather enjoyed using down tube shifters on my Southern Tier ride.  The simpler approach just seemed to fit with the minimalist approach I took for the trip in general.

DaveB:

--- Quote from: staehpj1 on November 30, 2012, 08:22:23 am --- I will say that I rather enjoyed using down tube shifters on my Southern Tier ride.  The simpler approach just seemed to fit with the minimalist approach I took for the trip in general.
--- End quote ---
OK, but isn't the Southern Tier about the flattest cross country route available?  The relative inaccessibility of downtube shifters isn't a handicap under those riding conditions.

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