Author Topic: Cross Country on a recumbent bike  (Read 3768 times)

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Offline privatesoldier13

Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« on: December 10, 2012, 01:39:26 pm »

Hey everyone I am about to ship out the Army January 22 of 2013. I am planning on taking a trip around the US  on a recumbent bike with a trailer and a tent and a solar powered generator (and also the necessary items)  Depending where I am after I finish the Army I will start there and make my way around the US. I would really like it if there were other riders with me. So please if you have anything to add or say please do and I would really like to hear from everyone their thoughts and ideas. Thank you and hope to hear from you all soon. 

Offline bogiesan

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2012, 08:42:02 am »
You're out of the serivce in January or you begin your service in January? Affects everyone else's potential planning. Wherever you begin your tour, you can probably hook up with someone going your  way. 
YOu may wish to examine the riding partners section of the site.

Thank you for your career in the Army in your service to America. BEst of luck on your discharge, whenever it occurs.
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline privatesoldier13

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2012, 10:31:38 am »
Well I start the ARMY in January and this is a 4 year plan that's how long I'll be in the army for. If my folks are still in Fl by the time I get out I'll have all my gear shipped to their house. My starting point would be in Orlando and IF  anyone is coming with me we'll go to st Augustine fl and jump on the southern tier and then go on the outside of the us.

Offline dminden1

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2012, 10:21:34 pm »
I've done over 10 years self-supported touring with recumbents. Here's what's important to know. Trailers are better than panniers: less bulk than underseat panniers, more balanced than a rear-heavy rear panniers, and overall less weight on the bike. Two-wheeled trailers are vital, essential, and one-wheeled trailers are unsafe and dangerous and will take you down. I was taken down by one (a friend on his recumbent had one and I switched with him to help him out!). I was going downhill in Acadia National Park in Maine at 35 mph and the trailer went into a wild shimmy and took me down. This is not a matter of inexperience or poor handling - I've gone 50 mph downhill. Two wheeled trailers are inherently much more stable, and also take all the weight off the bike. So, please be safe. Several good two wheeled trailers are out there, from the commonly found Burleys to the less common Wike (Canadian) and others.
On another note, recumbents are great for touring - comfortable, good power on flats and downhills. You will work much harder on uphills, but I do it anyway!
Enjoy the ride.
Dave from Madison, WI

Offline Iceman

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2012, 03:58:09 pm »
Maybe you can gleen some ideas/wisdom from my journal; www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/rayandruby. I rode cross country this year on a recumbent trike pulling a trailer most of the way. For me, alone time was fine but I also enjoyed having a riding partner later in the trip. Try not to keep to tight a schedule so you can take time off as needed to enjoy interesting areas and the people you meet. Thanks for your service, be safe and good luck with your trip.

Offline Gilou

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2013, 07:25:58 am »
I just enter this forum on Adventure Cycling,I'm a French biker,my english  writing is difficult to understand but I can give you some advice because I have ridden a recumbent bike for 3 years .For my opinion I really like paniers it had stability to the bike.
If you want to visit my Blog : remy.terrier.free.fr   you will find all kind of details on the type of bike & equipements.
Gilou

Offline ms1jojo

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2013, 09:18:32 am »
Hi all,
This piqued my interest as I am planning a cross country trip via recumbent in 2014. Actually I desire to circumnavigate the lower 48 but my husband/sag support driver has suggested Key West to San Diego for starters to see how it goes. I checked the mileage for what I desire and it turns out to be about 12,000 miles. I desire to travel via bike paths whenever possible.
My background is a Navy retiree and long distance backpacker for the past ten years or so. Just finished the Continental Divide Trail last summer. This summer is my husband's choice of location for the summer and its back to Alaska.  One of my hikes in 2002 was from Key West, FL to Newfoundland, about 5800 miles  in about 11 months so I figure by bike my hiking partner and I should be able to bike the 12,000 miles in a few months. Any comments, suggestions? Have traveled some 1000 miles via recumbent back in 2003 from Hornell, NY to Richmond, VA.

Offline John Nelson

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2013, 12:51:49 pm »
I desire to travel via bike paths whenever possible.
It's a popular goal, but you'll be lucky if 3% of your trip is on bike paths. You can increase this somewhat if you go out of your way to pick up trails such as the Katy in Missouri or Mickelson in South Dakota. Here and there you might find a bike path that will take you from 3 to 30 miles, but most of your riding will be on roads. Try to decide if you prefer busy roads with good shoulders, or sleepy roads with no shoulder. You usually can't get both a sleepy road and a good shoulder at the same time. The sleepy backroads are scenic and peaceful, but typically longer and hillier.

Have a great time.

Offline bogiesan

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2013, 02:10:03 pm »
Hi all,This piqued my interest as I am planning a cross country trip via recumbent in 2014.
...Any comments, suggestions? Have traveled some 1000 miles via recumbent back in 2003 from Hornell, NY to Richmond, VA.

Welcome to the group.
Your long trail experience will help you with packing and fitness but you'll be riding highways and some backcountry roads. This beautiful country's road systems were not designed for bicycle travel.
There are dozens of great bike touring books and websites. Start your research now. Almost every possible route has been done and documented online at least once. You can connect them easily with some effort and time. Join Adventure Cycling.
Your plans to start your trip in 2014 allow you plenty of time this season to get your recumbent long-distance legs and learn to pack. I strongly urge you to sign up for at least one multi-day, supported tour, 300-500 miles over 5-8 days.

I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline mucknort

Re: Cross Country on a recumbent bike
« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2013, 03:44:16 pm »

  Depending where I am after I finish the Army I will start there and make my way around the US. I would really like it if there were other riders with me. So please if you have anything to add or say please do and I would really like to hear from everyone their thoughts and ideas.
3 thoughts:
1. Thanks for your service to our Country.
2. You should post your plan and check for other's plans in the "Companions Wanted" section of this forum: http://www.adventurecycling.org/mag/companions.cfm
3. You're choice to tour on a recumbent bike is most excellent! I did many tours on a traditional touring bike and have now toured 1000's of miles on a recumbent. Either way I have loved touring, but the recumbent allows me to tour w/o butt/back/wrist/hand pain and gives me a better view of the scenery. I'd never-ever go back to an upright bike for touring.
Good Luck!