Bicycle Travel > General Discussion

Question: Highway Troubles?

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John Nelson:

--- Quote from: Charlie Parker on March 02, 2013, 05:42:32 pm ---Could I avoid limited access highways for the majority of the trip?

--- End quote ---
The TransAm uses 13 miles of interstate. The Northern Tier uses 47 miles. Not everybody has the same preferences, but for me, interstates are the worst possible roads to ride on--all that truck traffic making all that noise. Lonely country back roads are so much more enjoyable (albeit hillier and longer).

DaveB:
In most places bicycles are forbidden to use Interstate and other limited access highways.  The only places that allow bicycles on them are where alternative roads either don't exist or are considered so far away they are impractical.  When you have to be on an Interstate it's because there is no good alternative.

Pat Lamb:

--- Quote from: John Nelson on March 02, 2013, 09:01:30 pm ---The TransAm uses 13 miles of interstate. The Northern Tier uses 47 miles. Not everybody has the same preferences, but for me, interstates are the worst possible roads to ride on--all that truck traffic making all that noise. Lonely country back roads are so much more enjoyable (albeit hillier and longer).

--- End quote ---

I kind of enjoyed that hour on the TransAm from Walcott to Sinclair.  Easy grades, way wide shoulders, little trash that was hard to avoid.  The only trucks that didn't move into the left lane for us were the few who passed when they were being passed, and the two Sams/Walmart trucks.  Of course we were excited to be heading for the big town of Rawlins (snicker, chuckle, once you get there you'll understand!).

adventurepdx:

--- Quote from: DaveB on March 03, 2013, 10:26:25 am ---In most places bicycles are forbidden to use Interstate and other limited access highways.  The only places that allow bicycles on them are where alternative roads either don't exist or are considered so far away they are impractical.  When you have to be on an Interstate it's because there is no good alternative.

--- End quote ---

Not always so. In a lot of western states, bicycle riding on Interstates anywhere outside of urban areas is perfectly legal. In Oregon, for example, I can legally ride the length of I-5 from near the junction of I-205 south of Portland all the way south to the California line (with the exception of a section through Medford). And I can ride 84 east of the Portland Metro area east to Idaho.

But I agree with everyone else who says try to ride on the Interstates as little as possible.

johnsondasw:
A lot of I-90 in WA is legal for bikes even though there are lots of alternative routes.

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