Author Topic: Cycling partner(s)  (Read 2579 times)

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Offline Westinghouse

Cycling partner(s)
« on: March 28, 2013, 05:50:55 am »
I know there is a section for this elsewhere. However, here I go. I am looking at the strong possibility of doing a transcontinental tour beginning in or just after June this summer. I have cycled 37,000 miles (59,000 kilometers) through 19 countries, including several crossings of the USA. I am knowledgeable and experienced in the matter under discussion. Right now I am thinking the ST, E to W. I am also considering the Atlantic coast. There is also the possibility of the PCBR. I have thought about the US, Mexico, Central America, and South America. Then there's Western Europe. These are all possibilities, but for now the most likely route would be the ST.

I am not a spring chicken anymore. I am 63 and I work out regularly at a gym. My first choice of a cycling companion would be a woman with some cycling experience, but not necessarily with cycling experience.

I do a lot of stealth camping, with motels perhaps twice a week. Sometimes more than twice a week. I completed my last 3400 miles crossing in 54 days total and 43 days actually on the road. That is an example of my daily average. Of course, I am more than willing to compromise on mileage. I cannot expect anyone else to go my way. I usually eat in restaurants or out of food stores. The way I tour is inexpensive compared to what others pay for a tour of similar range and time.  I have bike toured in the USA, Canada, Mexico, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, China, and elsewhere. I have done the ST a number of times, the atlantic coast three times and more, 2600 miles of the NT, the pacific coast, and several other areas of the USA.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2013, 04:04:51 am »
Not even a nibble on this yet, much less a bite.

Offline BikeFreak

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2013, 01:57:18 am »
I have done the ST a number of times, the atlantic coast three times and more, 2600 miles of the NT, the pacific coast, and several other areas of the USA.

I have a more "mental" question: How do do manage to do (for instance) the Atlantic Coast 3 times? When I have ridden a route myself (it might be a very short one), riding it again becomes just plain boring to me. My first grand tour was the Northern Tier, which was the most memorable one. I would love to do it again, but I am afraid that a lot of adventure has gone because I will remember the road ahead of me.

Lucas

Offline staehpj1

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2013, 06:52:08 am »
I have done the ST a number of times, the atlantic coast three times and more, 2600 miles of the NT, the pacific coast, and several other areas of the USA.

I have a more "mental" question: How do do manage to do (for instance) the Atlantic Coast 3 times? When I have ridden a route myself (it might be a very short one), riding it again becomes just plain boring to me. My first grand tour was the Northern Tier, which was the most memorable one. I would love to do it again, but I am afraid that a lot of adventure has gone because I will remember the road ahead of me.

Just me, but...
The ST is pretty boring, scenery wise, the first time so it wouldn't make so much difference.  It is more about the people and the food for me, otherwise I wouldn't do the ST the first time.  Then there is the fact that in the winter route choices are limited if you want to stay in the continental US.  Also Westinghouse may not literally mean the AC ST route the whole way, so he might have ridden different roads much of the way on each trip.  At least that would have been an option, and on the east coast it would be even easier to vary the route.

Some routes like the Pacific Coast are more about the vibe than being an "adventure", so they would be nice to do again and again.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2013, 04:15:59 am »
Exactly! The ST to me is the southern tier of states. One time I did it using 90 all the way past New Orleans from FL. Then I went across TX following roads that took me through Odessa and midland, etc etc.

Another crossing went on 19-98 out of FL along the gulf waters. Another followed 20 out of FL between90 and 19-98. Another followed 90 again. In LA I have followed ACA's route, 90, 190, and various roads. Another crossing of TX took me along the gulf to Post Isabel and Brownsville and north along the border road to Van Horn. Another crossing took me into Marfa, etc. On one crossing I went north at the Salton Sea and cycled into Los Angeles instead of San Diego.

I tend to agree the same roads can get boring. We want something new. Highway 90 and the FL pandandle are always pretty good. But getting out of the eastern US tends to be a bit --ho hum I've seen it all thousands of times. When will the scenery start to change? I like the changing scenery to rugged western mountains, cactus, plains, prairies, and gunfights at the OK corral.

ACA's mapped ST is just fine. I often take the interstate across TX, NM, and AZ. It seems more direct. The scenery is comparable. Services are more than adequate. However, road surfaces often are not really good for cycling.

A great many people use interstates which might increase the likelihood of running into some maniac. The FBI have a special team investigating serial killers operating along the interstates. Check it out on google. It's scary. Ladies, I advise you not to cycle the interstates alone, and if you do, it might be a good idea to avoid truck stops. Look at the FBI's map where bodies have been found. Almost all were women, and those are only the ones who have been found. A great many more are missing, and you know that means. They might never be found. There are some extremely nasty characters running around just looking for women to murder. It's a terrible thing but true. I would advise women to avoid the interstates.

I have used interstates alone a number of times through Sentinel, AZ, Tucson, AZ, Yuma and into Winterhaven, CA on the Colorado River. The ST to me means only FL, AL, MS, LA, TX, NM, AZ, and CA. The roads are any roads and the towns any towns.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2013, 04:21:31 am »
As for the AC three times: Well, the times were spaced out quite a bit, and it was kind of like a sentimental journey, or one for nostalgia.

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2013, 04:26:50 am »
I would definitely like to do the pacific coast again. The scenery is out of this world. There is plenty of good fresh air off the ocean. There are many many hills, but so what? If you're a cyclist, you do the hills. The PCBR IMO is the premiere cycling route in the USA. It is Americana writ large. It is the route 66 of cycling.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2013, 01:13:00 pm by Westinghouse »

Offline edmilkman

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2013, 04:32:20 am »
hi Westinghouse,

I just checked in after posting a new dream tour of mine in the "Companions Wanted" section. Then I came over to search the forum for the word "Russia" with no luck, and then "eastern Europe" where I am browsing now.  You mentioned cycling there so I kept reading and was just wondering about your warning to cyclists on interstate highways?   How could a solo woman be in more danger on an interstate than on a backroad where the chance of undetected abduction would be in the "perps" favor?

Look for my request about a tour in Russia in a few days after it has posted if you care to reply to that.

Offline dwboca

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2013, 08:28:50 pm »
Hi Westinghouse,

Not a full hijack but a partial - sorry - but it's on topic.

I am not signing up for your tour (timing bad) but would like to see if there is interest on your part or any other people reading this post for joining me for any part or all of my modified Southern Tier tour. 
This is my basic route https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=213731278210051813731.0004c3e119ef9df5c7235&msa=0

I want to do this in 29 or 30 days, self-supported, camping most nights and a motel once a week.  The average daily mileage would be 92 miles to complete in 29 days.  The route is 2,600 miles and I "borrowed" it from two other cyclists who did it and said the route was pretty good.  I will be 55 years old and am into endurance activities.  I have never cycle toured before but have bought all the right equipment and am training/experimenting right now.  I will earnestly start training in October 2013 and be ready by March 2014 for my trip.

Check out my website:  www.paddleacrossflorida.com and navigate to the training section where I have started to post my bicycle exploits.


I have decided to do this alone but want to consider having someone join me.  The only two people I know whom I would invite cannot make it due to the time constraint (like me, they have jobs).

Let me know if any interest.

dave

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2013, 11:50:34 am »
I averaged over 90 miles a day from SE coastal Florida to Bangor, Maine. That was twenty-three years ago. I don't think I would want to try and do that kind of mileage now,

Offline Westinghouse

Re: Cycling partner(s)
« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2013, 09:20:30 am »
Edmilkman. The FBI say the majority of women seem to have been abducted from truck stops on interstates. They suspect longhaul truckers in many cases. Many trucks are equipped with GPS by their companies. If a serial killer is driving and stopping at interstate truck stops, it is normal for him to be there with a great many others. If he drives away from his appointed route, he can be traced. If a woman suddenly disappears, and he is traced there where he is not expected to be at the time of the disappearance, and he can be located at points of other disappearances at truck stops, he will be seen.  As long as he stays on his route, and operates at truck stops where many other truckers are normally expected to be, there are no detectable anomalies in his route, and no reason for suspicion. That's one reason. That way he is anonymous. The killings have been happening at an alarming degree of frequency. And keep in mind, the numberof those murdered are only for those whose remains have been found. There are a great many more who  disappared, perhaps never to be heard from or seen again.

Just a word of caution. Cross country cycling is great, but the bears you really have to watch out for walk on two feet and drive trucks and cars.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2013, 09:29:02 am by Westinghouse »