Author Topic: Getting hungry too fast while riding  (Read 3471 times)

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Offline paddleboy17

Re: Getting hungry too fast while riding
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2013, 01:01:10 pm »
I am in hunger mode on day 2, consistently. 

I would not worry too much about getting caught in a vicious protein cycle.  Note that I said add more protein to your diet, not go caveman.  :)
I usually try and use the protein enhanced pastas and oatmeal.  Whole grain stuff if pretty good too, and I try to use alternatives to white rice and white flour.

I also find it helpful to tear down camp and pack before I eat breakfast.  On day 2, I will be ravenous 2 hours after breakfast, so I prefer to get 2 hours of riding in before stopping for my first snack.

Count your blessing that you don't get muscle cramps.  I usually go through 2 small bottles of G2 a day, and that seems to be enough for me.  I only mentioned it in case you are a water only guy.   
Danno

Offline matthewjsteger

Re: Getting hungry too fast while riding
« Reply #16 on: April 10, 2013, 07:20:30 pm »
No I don't drink pure olive oil, but I do enjoy a tub of Duncan Heinz cake frosting each day I ride.  Just kidding! 

In all honesty, I have the same riding style as you do and have experienced the very same issues.  I've resigned myself to simply accepting that if a Snickers (or your favorite candy bar) can't fix it, then nothing can.   

 

Offline paddleboy17

Re: Getting hungry too fast while riding
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2013, 12:47:15 pm »
No I don't drink pure olive oil, but I do enjoy a tub of Duncan Heinz cake frosting each day I ride.  Just kidding! 

In all honesty, I have the same riding style as you do and have experienced the very same issues.  I've resigned myself to simply accepting that if a Snickers (or your favorite candy bar) can't fix it, then nothing can.

You need to set your standards higher.  I find a cold beer with a pretty girl really fixes it all. ;)
Danno

Offline bogiesan

Re: Getting hungry too fast while riding
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2013, 08:33:10 am »
Thanks for all your answers.

Concerning proteins: As already suggested plenty of times, this is the way to go. However as paddleboy mentions, they take more time to digest: I read somewhere on the internet that proteins need to broken down to carbs in order to fuel the muscles. This break down process (break down before they get available as fuel) requires energy. And that energy is taken from 1st hand carbs (like pasta, potatoes etc). Thus, it should be an "evil" cycle where valuable carbs are used for processing protein instead of being used as "fuel" right away.
I was always told that Tour de France racing (and alike) cyclists eat carbs alone.
I do drink Gatorade, however cannot remember if it is the G2 version - I just pick whats in the fridge. Or Powerrade. I like the stuff and could easily spend 10 dollars each day on "gas station Gatorade/Powerade". Alternatively I tried buying Gatorade powder (which is more economic) but that is a bit messy and tastes more chemial.
I never experience muscle cramps.
Lucas

Umm, digestion is far more complicated and everything you read on the interwebz is doubtful at best, dead wrong at worst. And there is a huge difference between these three states: hungry, depleted and empty. Hunger is often about satiety. Depletion is dangerous. An empty stomach is not necessarilly associated with either of the previous states. To be satisfied, you need to eat what you like and what you know works for you under the stress of touring. To avoid depleting your system, you must know what supplements and micronutrients you must maintain. The feeling of an empty stomach can just mean your last meal is successfully moving along.
You cannot make a direct comparision between yourself and a TdF racer unless you are a professional athlete. If that were the case, you'd have a nutrition specialist on your staff. Their diets are designed for their metabolisms and their riding requirements.

You can start with any of the several bicyclist nutrition books that are on the market. Adventure Cycling sells a great book written by their former nutrition columnist. Then you start the long process of experimentation, trying to find what foods and consumption schedules work for you.

Cramps are different from muscle spasms and they are caused by many factors including muscle strain, dehydration and trace element depletion.
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent