Author Topic: North Teir  (Read 1104 times)

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Offline r1pearce

North Teir
« on: July 15, 2013, 07:24:17 am »
I was originally planing on riding this route going east, starting in May. But Plans have changed and now the only chance I'm going to have is to start out in September and still going east, hoping to do it in about 80 days. Is this leaving it to late in the year? will it be possible to beat the weather or would I be better off taking a route further to the south?
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks

Offline indyfabz

Re: North Teir
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2013, 07:48:20 am »
Starting when in September?

Even if at the beginning of the month, you should at least expect cold and possibly snow in the Adirondack Mountains. September 22 will the be the last day you will be allowed to ride the entire length of Going to the Sun Road in Glacier National Park due to an ongoing road rehabilitation project:

http://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/gttsrfaq.htm

Sounds like you might be able to ride up and back down the west side. After that, you would have to take the Marias Pass detour.

Average nightly lows for Bismarck, ND in October are around freezing. Same is true for Lake Itasca, MN and Woodstock, VT. November is even colder.


Offline dkoloko

Re: North Teir
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2013, 08:16:55 am »
First question if you can get over the pass in Glacier Nat. Park if you follow Going to the Sun Rd. As to the East, I rode Northern Tier New England section in Oct. I encountered torrential rain, hail, snow flurries, hurricane winds, and temperatures down to the 20s.

Offline indyfabz

Re: North Teir
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2013, 08:33:57 am »
First question if you can get over the pass in Glacier Nat. Park if you follow Going to the Sun Rd. As to the East, I rode Northern Tier New England section in Oct. I encountered torrential rain, hail, snow flurries, hurricane winds, and temperatures down to the 20s.

Was that due to Hurricane Sandy, which is not the norm?

Offline dkoloko

Re: North Teir
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2013, 10:22:17 am »
First question if you can get over the pass in Glacier Nat. Park if you follow Going to the Sun Rd. As to the East, I rode Northern Tier New England section in Oct. I encountered torrential rain, hail, snow flurries, hurricane winds, and temperatures down to the 20s.

Was that due to Hurricane Sandy, which is not the norm?

Irene. Which says could be another storm in future.

In addition to my previous comments, add campgrounds closed.

Offline r1pearce

Re: North Teir
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2013, 12:49:02 pm »
Starting when in September?

Even if at the beginning of the month, you should at least expect cold and possibly snow in the Adirondack Mountains. September 22 will the be the last day you will be allowed to ride the entire length of Going to the Sun Road in Glacier National Park due to an ongoing road rehabilitation project:

http://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/gttsrfaq.htm

Sounds like you might be able to ride up and back down the west side. After that, you would have to take the Marias Pass detour.

Average nightly lows for Bismarck, ND in October are around freezing. Same is true for Lake Itasca, MN and Woodstock, VT. November is even colder.


I would be starting about the 10th of September. I will take the Marias Pass detour, which was my original plan anyway, and now the alternative is going to be closed by the time I get there its probably good that was the plan.

Offline indyfabz

Re: North Teir
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2013, 01:50:59 pm »
If you don't dally and don't take days off, you could make GTS leaving Anacortes on 9/10, or maybe a few days earlier. Marias vs. GTS is like Budweiser vs. prosecco. Long, not particularly scenic and has trucks. If the goal is to skip Canada, it's only about 64 miles from St. Mary to Cut Bank. From W. Glacier, the most you save is a day by riding Marias assuming you do a 102 mile day to Cut Bank. That gain is wiped out if you stop in E. Glacier on the way to Cut Bank.

As noted, many campgrounds, especially in the east, will be closed. In the Adirondacks, some start closing soon after Labor Day.

DK: Irene was late August of 2011. Sandy was October of last year.

Offline dkoloko

Re: North Teir
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2013, 02:05:45 pm »

DK: Irene was late August of 2011. Sandy was October of last year.

You posted correction before I had a chance to. It was an earlier hurricane. I did hole up during tropical storm Irene in NH doing another bicycle trip.

Offline indyfabz

Re: North Teir
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2013, 08:05:57 am »
Another consideration is hours of daylight. The further north you are, the shorter the days will be. Daylight savings time ends on Nov. 3 this year.