Author Topic: Sierra Cascades Question  (Read 676 times)

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Offline zzzz

Sierra Cascades Question
« on: November 06, 2013, 10:08:21 am »
Hi:

Recently got my maps  for next years trip, I'll be doing the Sierra Cascades route from Suma, Wa. to a little south of Giant Sequoia NP in Ca. (or maps 1-4). I've been in that area of California and I feel I know what to expect there. It looks like in Washington and Oregon there are a lot of days that will be dominated by long (15 to 35 mile) climbs at 3-4% grades.

The two benchmarks I hear regularly for tough climbing routes are eastern Kentucky on the TransAm and days w/ multiple big climbs in Colorado and I've done both of those as part of 100 mile days and I was tired but not toasted at the end of the day.

I realize I am asking for a "apples to oranges " comparison but....My question is to anyone who has done the Sierra Cascades route in Wa. & Oregon and also ridden the TransAm in Ky or Great Parks South. How does the difficulty compare?

I don't camp on these trips so every night I need to stop in towns w/ a hotel so I like to book rooms ahead of time.  In my first 2 long trips I just blocked out days in 80 -110 mile increments and that worked out fine but I'm seeing a lot comment about the difficulty of the route and it has me thinking maybe I should scale back the milage. I got on CGOB and read some journals but they have varied too much between them to settle it for me.

Pete

Offline mbattisti

Re: Sierra Cascades Question
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2013, 10:18:36 pm »
My wife and I rode the TransAm east to west on a fully-loaded tandem, then veered off the route in Missoula to intercept the Northern Tier (coincides with the Sierra Cascade route from Twisp westward).  We found the relentless roller-coaster and steeper graded hills of KY to be tougher than Washington Pass.  Of course by the time we reached the Cascades, we were in the shape of our lives! The lower humidity made it more bearable too. Two other variables to try and factor in.

Offline Cyclesafe

Re: Sierra Cascades Question
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2013, 01:24:11 am »
On the Sierra Cascades the toughest part of the route IMHO is the last third, in So. Cal.  The Sierras and the last day or two before Tecate.
Hoping to do the North Star with ACA in 2014.

Offline zzzz

Re: Sierra Cascades Question
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2013, 09:51:58 am »
to mbattista: Thanks for the reply. I don't know what's more impressive, that you did 4500± mile trip on a tandem, or that you did 4500± mile trip on a tandem and you're still married. Well Done! Whenever I have come across two people riding on a long tour together they are never riding two up, there has always been 50 to 200 yds between them. Like after 15 or 30 days they are desperate to get some space. Not a option on a tandem.

to cyclesafe: California looks like it's got some tough climbs. One in particular south of Yosemite is 6000 ft in 20 miles. Like 2 continuous Monarch Passes. As the saying goes, "Whatever doesn't kill you....."

I found PeteJack's (a commenter on this forum) journal from his trip down the SC last night on CGOAB. I think we have a different approach to these trips, but he was very descriptive of the terrain and I felt it was very helpful to read. I'm feeling much more confident on what I'm in for and can plan accordingly.

Thanks,
Pete

Offline canalligators

Re: Sierra Cascades Question
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2013, 12:59:04 pm »
Whenever I have come across two people riding on a long tour together they are never riding two up, there has always been 50 to 200 yds between them. Like after 15 or 30 days they are desperate to get some space. Not a option on a tandem.

If Capt. doesn't feel like talking, it's easy to pretend you're alone.  If Stoker doesn't feel like talking, she looks at the scenery.  But yes, you have to have these sorts of agreements, stated or not.