Author Topic: Tools for adventure  (Read 2373 times)

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Offline PeteJack

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2014, 12:05:46 am »
pick up our new Novara Safaris
My wife got a new Safari a few weeks ago. People have complained about the rack screws coming loose, I think I found the reason. The cheesy looking hex head cap screws that that retain the bottom of the rack only engage for a couple of threads and will strip out very easily if you overtighten them. The screws REI put in are M6 X 40. If you replace them with M6 X 50, the next length up,to get full thread engagement it interferes with the chain on the RHS if screwed in all the way so I shimmed it out with three washers. So, take a couple of M6 X 50 stainless socket head screws with you and a few washers when you pick up the bike. Then you will be able to tighten all the rack screws with a multi-tool and not have to faff with an adjustable wrench.

Other than that the Safari is a splendid machine. We are setting off for the Natchez Trace next month with one and my Trek 520 with 42K miles on it.

And yes you can fit an Ortlieb bar bag to those bars.

Offline BikePacker

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2014, 09:23:02 pm »
We are flying to Boston on April 15 to pick up our new Novara Safaris
Ken and Jules
Simply an fyi note of encouragement on your new rides ~  I have had the good fortune of owning/touring on and off road my 2001 Novara Safari since 2001 and found that its durability has met all of my expectations.  Would buy it all over again/would unhestitatingly recommend the rig to friends.
I wish you both a glorious expedition.
Your original Q was w/ regard to tools:
My best guess is that you have probably heard this before (& of course I request your forgiveness if it has already been posted above and I missed it), but there is a lot of value in the notion of only taking the tools that you really know how to use.... otherwise, you are simply adding to the weight/bulk of your load, not to mention the same for your false expectations.

Offline travellingfoxes

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #17 on: April 10, 2014, 05:25:26 am »
Thanks for the further advice guys! We are heading off to Boston on the 15 April, awaiting appropriate weather to commence our Epic Journey. Very excited.

Thanks again everyone!

Ken and Jules
Travellingfoxes

Offline Mauleskinner

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2014, 07:17:02 pm »
Fiber-fix replacement spoke
I'm a little late to the party, but...

I saw the Fiber-Fix a few years ago, and being the cheap-o that I am, I made an imitation that has served me quite well. You can see my Instructable here:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Emergency-Bicycle-Spoke-Repair-Kit/

I've also had my chain separate a few times, so a chain tool is a must...plus a "third hand" to hold the ends of the chain in close enough proximity to work easily. A 4-inch chunk of broken spoke bent at the ends to hook around the chain rollers works quite well.

Offline John Nelson

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #19 on: April 13, 2014, 09:06:49 pm »
I've also had my chain separate a few times
Wow, how is that happening? You're not putting pins back in, are you?

Offline Mauleskinner

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2014, 11:10:43 pm »
I've also had my chain separate a few times
Wow, how is that happening? You're not putting pins back in, are you?

Actually I do on occasion, but those aren't the ones separating. It's the two-piece connector links that I've had trouble with.

Offline PeteJack

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2014, 11:12:36 pm »
I've also had my chain separate a few times
Wow, how is that happening? You're not putting pins back in, are you?
On tour last summer my SRAM 9 spd chain had about 1000 miles on it. I was climbing a steep hill using the 24T front ring when just before the summit I shifted up to the 38T middle ring. There was a rattle like a can of marbles and the bike stopped, the chain had broken. At least it looked that way. What had happened was that the Quicklink had separated. I had a spare so I was off again in short order. I asked around about this and the only explanation anybody came up with was that I was just unlucky in where the Quicklink was when I shifted. The quite a large jump from 24T to 38T may have contributed. I rarely use the 24T ring, it's my 'get out of jail free' card.

Offline zerodish

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2014, 09:16:38 am »
Here it is refined by 100000 miles of touring. I also carry two valve core removal caps metal not the ones that come with slime. https://www.flickr.com/photos/63373992@N07/7122658997/

Offline PeteJack

Re: Tools for adventure
« Reply #23 on: April 15, 2014, 11:15:06 am »
Take some electrical tape (the good 3M stuff) for when your Safari bar tape comes undone as it surely will.