Author Topic: dogs and security  (Read 1473 times)

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Offline 30milespersandwich

dogs and security
« on: June 12, 2014, 02:08:14 am »
Does anyone have troubles with chasing biting dogs and how do you deal with it? I'm looking for ideas to take with me this summer. I don't want to hurt the dog but all I have now is a form of acrobatics to keep the bike between me and the dog. Thanks

Offline Pat Lamb

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2014, 09:23:25 am »
Browse (or search) through the archives.  Dogs are a popular topic for discussion -- right behind gearing, I suspect.

My preferred defense is Halt!, a pepper spray.  If you can find the handlebar holster, you can grab and squirt while riding.

Offline indyfabz

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2014, 09:27:21 am »
Yes. Go to the fourm index:

http://forums.adventurecycling.org/index.php#c1

In the upper right hand corner search for "dogs".

Plenty of threads on the issue.

A good, loud yell or a squirt to the face with a water bottle has never failed me. Show them you are top dog.

Offline rondickinson

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2014, 09:43:10 pm »
We are on the Trans Am and have went from Yorktown VA to the middle of Missouri.  First I would say we have had little problems with dogs.  Only 4 in Va and believe it or not only 3 in KY.  We had a few vicious encounters early and the three of us all had whistles.  Mine is a regular ref. whistle and the others are rescue whistles.  We all three blasted as loud as possible once the dog gets within 20 yards.  Some stop instantaneous and look confused.  Some run along side you but not come within 6 feet.  I think it is something they are not accustomed to hearing and don't know how to deal with it.

Offline Cyclesafe

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2014, 09:34:12 am »
The most dangerous aspect of being attacked by dogs is them having you swerve into traffic.  Forget the acrobatics and forget about not hurting them.  Rather an injured (or dead) dog then an injured (or dead) cyclist.
Hoping to do the North Star with ACA in 2014.

Offline bogiesan

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2014, 08:50:10 pm »
Does anyone have troubles with chasing biting dogs and how do you deal with it? I'm looking for ideas to take with me this summer. I don't want to hurt the dog but all I have now is a form of acrobatics to keep the bike between me and the dog. Thanks

To heck with the dog. A dog that attacks might freakin' maim you or much worse. You owe the dog nothing. Your choice of defense depends on your need to survive. Sprays are dangerous because they deploy at the push of a button and  often end up hitting everyone and everything except the attacking animal but they're popular. Super loud whistles or horns can confuse, stun and deflect an attacking animal long enough for you to escape. Airzounds is a popular device, so are electronic horns, so are little freon horns for boating. The business end of these devices must be mounted where the blast will not hit your own ears.

Some folks carry firearms ostensibly for this kind of protection but that's another rather touchy topic and I'm not touching it.
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline windrath

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2014, 04:04:11 pm »
I agree with bogiesan.  When I see a dog, my first action is to unclip and be ready to kick.  I yell first, kick second.  I never get off my bike.

My uncle used a spray bottle and then graduated to a 2' long stick (wood dowling) that he kept on his handlebars.  He would whack the dog on the snoot.

Now, if you are riding through Alaska and bears cross your path - none of this works if they come at you.  :)

Offline RandomGuyOnABike

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2014, 12:20:43 pm »
I've never had an issue with animals, even a pack of wild dogs that decided to "try" me.. the trick with is to control your fear (not easy, adrenaline is a !@#$ to control), realize that YOU are higher in the food chain, and stand your ground. If they attack, then kill them, it's that simple.

I've never been around bear country, so not sure if that tactic would work on them, but it does work on dogs. The only thing is though is that it might not work if the dog has rabies, since rabies makes the animal "not right in the head".

Animals have the uncanny ability to sense fear in others, and also when they should be afraid.

edit: I should also add that I do NOT condone senseless killing of any animal and I truly abhor "sport hunting". However, if it comes down to either me or an animal, I will choose myself every time.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 12:26:22 pm by RandomGuyOnABike »

Offline hyegeek

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2014, 12:52:02 pm »
If they attack, then kill them, it's that simple.

That's the way I look at it. While I start with non-lethal non-harmful whistles and yelling, by the time I'm yelling, I am directing any fear into anger/determination that if you bite me you die. So far, the dogs have sensed this and backed off. If I see the owner, I'm very vocal with my threat to the dog. I want the owner to see the downside of their dog harassing people on public roads. Fortunately, I've never had to follow through with the determination to harm a vicious dog, I really don't have any desire to harm them, but a vicious loose dog is just not something that will end well.

Offline 30milespersandwich

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2014, 03:48:57 pm »
A lot of good ideas, I bought a whistle and some mace. I think I'll keep the mace for humans in the city. lol  I like the stick idea too. I doesn't have to be big and heavy, just needs to sting.   Thanks   8)

Offline RandomGuyOnABike

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2014, 03:51:36 pm »
I have seen collapesable baton sticks that are electrified; however, they are pretty much illegal everywhere.

Offline BikeFreak

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2014, 12:41:45 pm »
I have ridden the Northern Tier, Pacific Coast, TransAm, Western Express and parts of Atlantic Coast. I would say that the Transam alone has the dog issue. In VA, KY, MO ... bible belt, hill billy country, confederate-flag-on-the-porch-countryside or whatever you could call it, have all the aggressive dogs. I think when I did the Northern Tier I had 2 dog encounters for the entire length. On the Transam maybe 20 - and I never get used to it and I hate it.

I yell and usually pedal faster - it has worked so far. But also having a squeezable water bottle ready should help.

Does anybody know what these ultrasonic dog whistles could do in such a situation? I mean the whistle that most humans cannot hear, but dogs hear them very well.

Lucas

Offline Westinghouse

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2014, 10:33:06 pm »
For some dogs in eastern Europe, I would suggest at least a 38. U.S. dogs will not try to tear you apart. They are out for a romp and that is all.  But, yes, there could be that one or a few that are radicalized and thirsty for your blood. Stop. Yell. Go. Stop. Yell. And so forth. If by that time its keeper is not outside in the yard yelling for the dog to come back, just keep going, stopping, and yelling "Hut!" It will soon turn and leave. That is for the normal ones having a friendly chase.

The crazy bloodlust dogs are another matter. If it is really going for you in a vicious and serious way, anything should be allowed. A squirt gun of ammonia would be appropriate. Just about anything. Shoot it if you must.

Offline geniuswh

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2014, 07:39:39 pm »
If they attack, then kill them, it's that simple.

That's the way I look at it. While I start with non-lethal non-harmful whistles and yelling, by the time I'm yelling, I am directing any fear into anger/determination that if you bite me you die. I believe this is a good method. So far, the dogs have sensed this and backed off. If I see the owner, I'm very vocal with my threat to the dog. I want the owner to see the downside of their dog harassing people on public roads. Fortunately, I've never had to follow through with the determination to harm a vicious dog, I really don't have any desire to harm them, but a vicious loose dog is just not something that will end well.

Good, but I think by the time you start yelling and whistling, the angry dog will have already done his job (biting). So in my opinion, it's better to act quickly and resort to lethal measure.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2014, 05:25:06 pm by geniuswh »

Offline Westinghouse

Re: dogs and security
« Reply #14 on: July 21, 2014, 07:52:02 pm »
I have bicycle toured about 39,000 miles through 19 countries. Only a few times have I encountered extremely vicious dogs, I mean dogs that would really kill you, and two of those were in east Europe in 1994. And I assure you those dogs deserved being shot. You had to be there to see it. It was like something out of a horror movie. If there is a serious attack, animal or man, you have the right to use lethal force if you fear for your life, in Florida anyway.