Author Topic: sequoia for loaded touring  (Read 3806 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ksbkrgrl

sequoia for loaded touring
« on: July 02, 2004, 08:26:14 pm »
Hi,  I just bought a specialized sequoia sport and I was wondering if it could be used for loaded touring if it pulled a BOB or similar trailer?  I know it is great for light touring.  thanks for your help.

Erin


Offline cidhandyman

sequoia for loaded touring
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2004, 12:56:44 am »
Greetings,

I dont know firsthand if the Sequoia would be ideal for loaded touring.  My main concern is the lighweight wheelset that the bike comes with.  Even if you chose to pull your gear in a Bob trailer you may want to update the rear wheel at a minimum and also check into tires with more flat resistant tread. Otherwise if you feel the gearing is low enough to get you up and over hills okay you may be able to use it for some mid duty touring.  I have a Novara Randonee and although it is still more of an entry level touring rig, I feel its worth a look to get a frame with a longer rear triangle.  This gives you more clearance for the back of your feet and prevents kicking your rear panniers if you chose to use them at a later date.  
I would also check the following as they compare to more touring specific bicycles:
handlebar height in relation to seat height, try to level off both to prevent major leaning to reach brake and shiftlevers and also save your back in the process.
Make sure the gearing is low enough to climb hills.
consider a wider seat for more support

Feel free to write if you have more questions.



Keep pedaling

Julian H.
Keep pedaling

Julian H.

Offline ksbkrgrl

sequoia for loaded touring
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2004, 10:50:19 am »
thanks for replying.  I know after having cycled for a couple hundred miles on it that the gearing is way to high for hills.  I live in Kansas and I have am in the lowest granny gear and still could use more.  I think  I will just use this bike as an event bike and light touring/credit card touring for awhile.  then I want to get a Bruce Gordon BLT for my touring bike.  First I want to see if I can do and like touring.  I also asked specialized about using the sequouia for touring and they were concerned about the brake system not being strong enough.  So I definitely agree with you.  How much was your touring bike, where did you get it?  and would you buy it again or do you have another recommendation.  Thanks again for the tips.

ERin


Offline cidhandyman

sequoia for loaded touring
« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2004, 04:42:06 pm »
Hello again,

I'm glad my tips were of some help.  I have a Novara Randonee touring bike.  It retails for $839.00 for the basic bike.  I got a steal of a deal by purchasing a 2001 model in early 2002.  REI was selling them at $550.00.  I was able to have one shipped in my size from Colorado at the same low sale price.  This saved me tons of money off the bat.  I have fairly cheap blackburn racks but I want to upgrade to thicker tubular racks.  I'm looking into Old Man Mountain racks due to the increased tubing diameter and heavy duty construction.  
The important considerations for me were the following: an aheadset stem for quick stem changes and adjustments, low gearing, a non descript color, eyelets for racks and fenders, 8 or 9 speed gearing with a granny gear, three water bottle mounts, and cantilever brakes.  I found all this and more with my current bicycle.  I have upgraded the entire drivetrain to give me even lower gears.  I have a Race Face mountain bike bike crank which I find is much stiffer and transfers power better.  I use 44 tooth, 32 tooth and 22 tooth chainrings in front.  I also have a wide range 11-32 tooth cassette out back.  I have taped over my stickers to make the bike look cheap and deter theft while commuting around town.

If I had it to do all over again there are other bicycles I would consider but for simplicity and reliability the Randonee works for me.

Have you obtained any other gear or are you still trying to get a bearing on which things to acquire and which things you can do without?  You may want to take a look at the touring bicycle buyers guide that Adventure Cycling produces.  It has some good tips on things to consider before purchasing a touring specific bicycle.

Don't let the myriad of choices deter you from getting involved. I started off with an old Bianchi racing bike and have slowly learned what works and what doesnt by riding and asking others.

Talk to ya soon.

Julian

Keep pedaling

Julian H.
Keep pedaling

Julian H.

Offline ksbkrgrl

sequoia for loaded touring
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2004, 11:57:02 am »
Hi,  I am still in the dreaming and training stage.  I have a mountain bike and the sequoia.  I use the sequoia for events and the mountain bike for commuting to work.  My longest distance ride is 40 miles. I hope to do a metric century by the end of august and an 80 in October.  I some gear but mostly just the day to day riding stuff.  Shorts, hydration pack, kid trailer, jerserys, helmet, etc.  I don't have any touring specific stuff yet, ie tent, sleeping bag, etc.  Any suggestions on where to get the best stuff for a good price?  How did you figure out what the best gear was?  Thanks, Erin


Offline cidhandyman

sequoia for loaded touring
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2004, 12:20:15 pm »
Hi Erin,

You know I am in the stages of getting my stuff together also.  I have found that reading travelogues of other travelers, from novices to those who bicycle across the globe gives me a starting point.  I also read the online versions of many outdoor magazines.  Some examples are below:
www.backpacker.com
www.crazyguyonabike.com
www.outsideonline.com
www.gorp.com
www.kenkifer.com
www.bicycling.com
www.travel-library.com

On these sites you can find packing lists which include the basic items to take and in many cases personal recommendations from other more established bicycle tourers.  I take a summation of this info and print out what I need to study further.  This list is taken to the local REI or Galyans and also some thrift shops.  This way I can see it, try it on and figure out what sizes work best.  From here I usually find the gear is way too overpriced.  Here is a good tip.  I check resale shops for gear often.  To date I have found Pearl Izumi rain pants ($3.99), Pearl Izumi Zephyrr rain jacket ($3.99, Patagonia fleece top (4.99), mountain hardwear rain jacket (7.99) you get the idea.  You can save much money over new if your budget is tight.  I usually check the Goodwill and resale shops in wealthier neighborhoods for best results.  Many times items are donated once there are abrasions, or out of style. My mountain hardwear is purple but I saved over $200.00 on the purchase price.

As far as a tent and sleeping gear. I find many items on ebay.  If I come across an item from the websites listed above I research it online to see how favorably it was reviewed, the pros and cons, then I review what size or model fits my needs.  Then I decide what the max is that I will pay and bid for the item.  This way I bid once and not over and over.  If the final bid exceeds my max then I keep looking until I find the item for the price Im willing to pay.  My tent is an Eureka solo bivy.  It retailed for $89 new, I found mine on clearance at The Sports Authority for $15.  I am putting together a lightweight system of clothing and gear to reduce my on bike carry weight.  My gear will also double as backpacking gear and I want to keep my packweight as light as possible.  In this case I watch the weight of everything I purchase but I also seek out low prices.  This isnt the easiest thing to accomplish but it can work with patience and planning. As far as as a stove, I chose to go with an alcohol stove.  I wanted something that didnt rely on store bought fuel cannisters which are hard to find in some places.  Denatured alcohol can be found in most hardware stores very cheaply and fuels a homemade stove.  You can also buy these on ebay for about $5 to $15 for the stove, windscreen and fuel bottle.

The other thing you are doing which is highly important is continuing to train and dream of where you want to go.  You may not believe this but I have yet to go on an extended tour.  I am in the planning stages as well.  I commute by bicycle myself about 85 miles a week. I'm slowly adding mileage each week to build up my base miles.  My problem is I cant decide where to go. I want to go overseas at some point but I want to get some solid experience touring in the states first.  You may want to consider the supported tours with Adventure Cyclist Magazine.  They have a section on the website which details what they offer.  You can also acquire maps from them with info relevant to bicycle touring.

I ride portions of the Lewis and Clark trail on my training rides from St. Louis to Alton and over to St. Charles.  Local rides are best to practice using camping gear and get used to riding a loaded bicycle.

How is the  bicycle riding in Kansas?  In Missouri we have rolling hills to just about everywhere and the humidity in the summer can be sticky.  

Talk to ya later.

Julian



Keep pedaling

Julian H.
Keep pedaling

Julian H.

Offline cidhandyman

sequoia for loaded touring
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2004, 02:12:21 pm »
Erin, I will start leaving you website links to info which may help you and anyone else who views this thread.

http://www.jandd.com/Technotes/technotes_HowToPack_pan.asp

Keep pedaling

Julian H.
Keep pedaling

Julian H.

Offline kjim

sequoia for loaded touring
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2005, 02:13:12 pm »
  If you like the Sequoia and it is comfortable for long distances, you might consider getting a strong wheel with say mavic or rhino/sun rims and a cassette
geared low for touring say 12-34 oe the like. Put wide tires that are puncture resistant(kevlar or other similar fibers do this.) on the wheels. Then when you tour put the 2nd set of wheels on and hook up the trailer and go. YOu might want to consider a smaller inner chain ring for lower low gears. Especially if your comfortable switching the chain ring yourself.
Jim K


Offline ksbkrgrl

sequoia for loaded touring
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2005, 04:19:01 pm »
Thanks for the advice.  I put 35 mm tires on the bike.  I found a pair of carradice lippett panniers for the front.  I have used it for a loaded tour and credit card tour.  It is a good bike for all around riding.  Not great at any one thing but useful for most.  I also changed the front chainrings to be the same as the bruce gordon set up.  Erin