Author Topic: How To Uploading Photos To A Journal  (Read 3918 times)

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Offline james2u

How To Uploading Photos To A Journal
« on: December 27, 2004, 10:04:56 pm »
Hello, We are planning a Trans Am next summer and plan on doing a
online journal. Can anyone tell me how to upload photos while on the
road?
Thanks, James


Offline JayH

How To Uploading Photos To A Journal
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2004, 01:23:54 pm »
Well, first you'd have to find a place that will allow you to download your pictures to a local (temp) folder on a hard drive. Libraries, internet cafes, etc. Libraries though you may have a problem with downloading stuff since many of them will prohibit any data transfer between outside devices, be that USB connections, Floppies, CDs, etc. (virus and liability problems). Internet cafes might be more receptive cause they are a business that you'd pay for the time.   But given that you have access to a PC and an internet account/ISP, the idea would be to transfer the pictures to a hard drive and then upload it to your ISP via some kind of FTP program or through a server's HTTP protocol. (OFOTO, Grovestreet, Webshots will allow you to upload with an FTP client just by having the photos on a local hard drive and uploading it).  So basically, you need to sign up with a free photo hosting place such as ofoto or others, and then have some access to a local drive on a PC/Mac.   Or, if you're travelling with a notebook, you just need an internet connection.    Then there's wireless networks....

Jay


Offline rtwbikerider

How To Uploading Photos To A Journal
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2005, 03:43:04 pm »
   James, you should consider bringing a Pocket PC and mobile phone/56K modem combination along for the ride. My Pocket PC had an HTML Editor and FTP software installed so that I could maintain a website and occasionally upload new pages, photos, and other files for my family and friends to track my progress. My trip was mostly outside of the U.S., so I used a tri-band GSM mobile phone and had access to Earthlink's international phone numbers in the countries that I visited. If you're staying in the U.S. you probably won't go with GSM because of the limited coverage. When you're indoors, use the 56K modem for data transfers. I believe that the transfer rate between the infrared ports on my Pocket PC and mobile phone were around 10K. You can build a very nice website with the space provided by most ISP's. Usually you have 60 to 80 meg available if you use all of the family members' space on your account. Good luck, and have fun.