Author Topic: Highway Law  (Read 3231 times)

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Offline jammyc

Highway Law
« on: August 27, 2005, 09:50:46 am »
Yo,

I'm a Brit hoping to do the Southern Tier route in October - does anyone know where I can get the road laws for cycles for each of the states? I've tried searching on the net and I've had no joy so far.

Ta muchly (c:


Offline DaveB

Highway Law
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2005, 06:11:02 pm »
Each state has a "Department of Transportation" web site that should have a link to it's vehicle code and particularly its bicycle laws.  It may be laborious as you will probably have to go to each state's web site that you plan to travel through to see what its laws are.
 
BTW, each state has a tourism web site and many have a specific bicycle travel link.  Those are worth looking up too.  As you will discover, this is a BIG place. :)



Offline judyrans

Highway Law
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2005, 12:50:35 am »
The Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition has a web page listing sources of bike laws for the 50 states as well as territories:

http://www.massbike.org/bikelaw/statelaws.htm


Offline canalligators

Highway Law
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2005, 01:00:31 pm »
You'll probably find that the states differ only on minor details.  For example, all require front lights and rear reflector, except some require a tail light.  All will have statements to the effect that cyclists must ride as far to the right as "practicable" or "practical".  Some might also require single file when motor vehicles are passing.  All common sense stuff, and most are modelled after federal guidelines.

Bike laws are rarely enforced anyway.  And any rights you may be granted by the law have to be tempered by the fact that there's the occasional moron who thinks you have no right being there.  Probably not much different from your shire.


Offline ptaylor

Highway Law
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2005, 10:04:02 pm »
I will agree with canalligators. Laws are almost never enforced. They are an issue only when there is a crash and someone tries to prove you were breaking a law of some sort, thus reducing their liability. There are a couple that canalligators did not mention
.
1. All states prohibit vehicles with less that a 50 cc engine from most Expressways. These are clearly marked at the expressway entrance.

2.Some states and cities require cyclists to wear helmets...but this is something I hope you world do anyhow.

Paul

Offline jammyc

Highway Law
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2005, 07:34:27 am »
Score, thanks guys! Now the only thing I've got to do is learn to drive on the right side...;)


Offline DaveB

Highway Law
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2005, 07:53:46 pm »
All states prohibit vehicles with less that a 50 cc engine from most Expressways. These are clearly marked at the expressway entrance.

This operative word here is "most".  Some Western states allow bicycles and pedestrians to use the shoulders of "Expressways" (i.e. Interstate Highways) when there is no practical alternate road.  This will be on a case-by-case basis and you will have to find out where they are.  I expect each state's DOT will be able to tell you which Interstates are open to bikes and where.  

If the expressway entrance ramp has a "Motorized Vehicles Only" or similar sign, obviously that road, or that section of road is off-limits to bicycles.