Author Topic: POllUTING BICYCLES  (Read 5350 times)

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Offline jimbeard

POllUTING BICYCLES
« on: June 02, 2006, 10:51:04 pm »
 Does any else ever feel that because of supported touring ,driving to a  destination to ride a bike ECT. ECT .that the bicycle is actually using more fossil fuel than it saves therefore it is actually polluting our planet?
 

Jim

Offline Fred Hiltz

POllUTING BICYCLES
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2006, 07:41:34 am »
Right, and we should not ride the bike either. All that heavy breathing releases additional carbon dioxide. Killing yourself will not help, as your decomposing body emits methane, an even worse global warming gas.

I'll just drive over to watch the NASCAR race instead.

Fred


Offline DaveB

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« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2006, 12:22:47 pm »
Well, you are going to eventually release methane  anyway so, by eliminating your CO2 emissions between now and then, you can benefit the planet.


Offline jimbeard

POllUTING BICYCLES
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2006, 03:20:43 pm »
FRED I was just wondering how other people feel about this subject.
   It seems like we could use bicycles as transportation a lot more than we currently do.
If a motor home follows a bicycle across the country perhaps he is using more fossil fuel than a NASCAR race .
I am just asking if bicyclists are thinking about thease things . Did not mean to offend anyone .  
                 JIM

Jim

Offline DaveB

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« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2006, 06:17:23 pm »
Quote
It seems like we could use bicycles as transportation a lot more than we currently do.

Of course we could, that's self evident.  The problem is convincing people to want to.  

As an illustration, back in the early '80s during one of the past "gas crises", Yamaha commissions a study to see what part of the population would consider a motorcycle as at least a partial substitute for their car, citing vastly better fuel economy (60 mpg is easy for a moderate size motorcycle and much higher is available with small displacement bikes).  

The survey showed well over 80% of respondents wouldn't consider it no matter how expensive gas became.  And this survey was about motorcycles which require almost no physical effort and can keep up with auto traffic easily.  What do you think the results would be for a similar survey about bicycles?

Bicycle commuters and those who use them for shopping, errands, etc. fall into two categories; 1) a small number of dedicated riders or 2) those so far down on the financial food-chain that a bicycle is their only choice.  
 



cyclesafe

  • Guest
POllUTING BICYCLES
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2006, 11:32:54 am »
Another group is comprised of persons who live in extremely bicycle-friendly or extremely car-unfriendly places.  Perhaps a college campus would fit the former and a safe urban area like Tokyo would fit the latter.  I can imagine that many European cities fall into both categories.  Alas, not the US.


Offline alfonso

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« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2006, 04:00:17 am »
Jim raises a point we should consider: how much pollution do we generate in our eco-friendly pursuit?

The pollution (or resource depletion) isn't confined to riding. We use high-tech, sometimes rare,  materials in alloys; bicycle manufacture itself generates greenhouse and other pollution; and we depend on the auto industry (among others) for advances in technology.

That doesn't make us as culpable as car drivers (and as Jim says many of us arearecar drivers), but neither are we pure as snow. If we do drive autos in connection with biking activities, we should think hard about how to minimise it.


Offline RussellSeaton

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« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2006, 08:57:34 pm »
I've thought of it.  But that is about all I have done with the idea.  I drive to the ride start location 5 days a week.  Usually these are 3-6 miles away.  I don't think I have ever considered riding to the start location.  Even on the weekends when I could get up half hour early and ride there.  Too much hassle riding back through the city when the ride is over.

On Saturday I drove about 200 miles round trip to do a 250 mile ride.  If I had stayed home, I would not have driven 200 miles.  This coming weekend I will drive about 350 miles for a two day ride.  Without the ride I would likely not drive 350 miles this weekend.

In July I'm driving out to Colorado to do two days of riding.  1400 miles of driving for 250 miles of riding.

But I am planning on riding to and from the RAGBRAI start and end towns.  So there!

For me I probably burn more gas because I ride a bike.


Offline TheDaltonBoys

POllUTING BICYCLES
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2006, 01:05:53 pm »
Maybe it could be thought of in the same vein as "van-pooling/car-pooling" given there are multiple humans utilizing one vehicle as opposed to what we usually see on the highways and byways of this country....one person/one vehicle. I dare say that in the near future these types of excursion/support vehicles will be running on Bio fuels. Our cyclist mindset (Recreational cyclists, Transportation cyclists, uprights, recumbents, unicycles....all) is way ahead of the bulk of the country we're doing O.K. Next we'll see more and more Engineering designs that comprise equal parts of new highway/street construction for both vehicular AND cycling/pedestrian use. Car-less since 2000....Mark of the Dalton Boys


Offline DaveB

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« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2006, 12:35:08 pm »
Quote
I dare say that in the near future these types of excursion/support vehicles will be running on Bio fuels.

Two problems:

1. There isn't enough "biofuel" to come anywhere near filling our energy requirements.

2. Currently, ethanol, the most talked about biofuel, takes much more energy to produce than it provides.  Where do you thing THAT energy comes from?


Offline scott.laughlin

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« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2006, 08:53:30 pm »
The sun?


Offline mike_khad1

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« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2006, 12:01:04 am »
I live in a very bicycle-friendly city (Portland Oregon). In addition to being a very bicycle-friendly city, Portland also has an extensive mass transit system. I commute by bicycle just about every day. It is 13 mile each way and approximately 9 of those miles is on a dedicated multi-use bicycle path. I've encouraged 2 co-workers to try bicycle commuting by showing them where and how to rent bike lockers, where the showers are, route planning, etc. As expensive as gasoline is, I am amazed at how many cars I see with a single occupant.

Work to Eat
Eat to Live
Live to Bike
Bike to Work

Offline TheDaltonBoys

POllUTING BICYCLES
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2006, 10:19:14 am »
Apologies...the point is correct and the distribution of Bio-Fuels is nowhere near what is needed for todays requirments. My point however might be better illustrated by saying that the comparison is based on "todays" needs for fuel, and not the required reconfigured needs of the future. I believe that it will be a "step-down" process wherein what holds more people will be the true start of significant "oil-weaning" and ensuing alternative measures for both transportation and energy. Me....I'm doing what I can and up until almost seven years ago I merrily fired up my vehicle to go one quarter of a mile total for milk, or was it cigarettes. I didn't get "it" until I was 50 so my fellow bretheren from the 60's...you were right....I wasn't listening....I apologize. Now remember folks...when in doubt, ride your bike. With Kindest Regards...Mark of the Dalton Boys


Offline pmspirito

POllUTING BICYCLES
« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2006, 11:11:13 pm »
Now that Jim opened the door to this energy thing my gripe is the focus on recycling.  What a waste.  All those plastic bins and the special garbage trucks making a special trip around town to pick up a milk jug and a dozen soda cans at each house. Then they haul this stuff back to the special building built to sort the stuff and then haul the sorted stuff back to wherever it goes.  And how much energy does that all take. I say just pick up everything in one trip and haul it all to the dump.

best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito
best wishes from the back of the pack,  Peter & Judy Spirito

Offline DaveB

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« Reply #14 on: June 14, 2006, 10:15:20 pm »
Quote
The sun?

Ultimately, I suppose so but so did oil and coal. In the immediate term the energy to create biofuel comes from petroleum, natural gas and coal and the energy needed is more than the energy provided by biofuel.  

Realistically, the current biofuel fad is a windfall for the corn growing states and their Senators, not to the public.
 
You have to think a bit more globally to understand what is really going on.