Author Topic: going south  (Read 2620 times)

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Offline tailwind

going south
« on: September 28, 2006, 05:38:01 pm »
hello all
i am looking to ride south for the winter. i'll be leaving vancouver, canada at the begining of december. I have no planed route and i have never be south. My trip will last untill the money runs out, so i will be looking at gurrila camping with a few exceptions(avoiding major populations).if there are any suggestions on routes in U.S. Mexico or futher please tell me

thank you


Offline Badger

going south
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2006, 08:36:37 pm »
See if you can find a copy of the book BICYCLING THE PACIFIC COAST.  It has direction from Vancouver BC to the Mexican boarder, don't forget Adventure cycling maps they have direction for going North and South and are excellent.  At that time of year I bet I don't have to tell you to have some good rain gear.  Have the time of your life and be safe.


Offline tailwind

going south
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2006, 04:34:38 pm »
thanks for the suggestion, i was looking for a kinda pacific coast vs. great divide. i ve heard the coast to northern cali is good and i have heard nothing about the great divide. i guess i willjust check out that book

erik


Offline John Nettles

going south
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2006, 04:40:19 pm »
If you are saying you want to ride the Great Divide or any mountain passes for that matter in December, you had better have tremendous fortitude :).  Most non-major road passes could be closed due to snow then but depending on luck, route, etc. I guess it could be done but it would be something I would not enjoy.

If you are wanting to get south for the winter, I would suggest a bus as the extra food you will eat to stay warm will be less than the bus fare.  Additionally, you will have more time in a better climate.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn
Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!
John

Offline DaveB

going south
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2006, 11:50:40 pm »
One other item, get and bring a passport.  I'm not sure when the regulations take effect but sometime soon travelers between the US and Canada will be REQUIRED to show passports.  Also, I think Canadian citizens need a passport to enter Mexico.


Offline tailwind

going south
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2006, 03:54:38 pm »
thanks TJ, but i feel i would be missing alot if i took a bus. i have however moved my departure date up to the end of oct. giving me a window to try and catch the heat and sun. Ive heard that the coast to north cali is good, what about the south part of the divide, would it be worth a trip over to it??

i think passports are manditory for canadians entering the US, have been for a while, i think.


Offline John Nettles

going south
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2006, 05:02:10 pm »
I understand about the bus versus riding.  I just wouldn't want to freeze my ball bearings off riding in the snow when I could be in the sun :).

Regarding the passes along the continental divide, they could still be cold at night (in the mid 20s)but dry in mid-December (I estimated your ETA).  Daytime high average around 55-65 along the Mexico/AZ/NM border.  Obviously, the further north you go, the colder it gets.

I know there is a strong ex-pat population around Puerto Penasco just south of AZ along the Gulf of California.

Hope you enjoy your trip!

Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!

TulsaJohn
Happy trails and may the wind be at your back!
John

Offline valygrl

going south
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2006, 05:20:10 pm »
I think Pac Coast makes a whole lot more sense that time of year.

On bikeforums.com, someone recently posted a link for some mexico touring that sounded spectactular.  

You know the divide route is dirt, and high-altitude, right?

Check out the seasonal averages available on weather.com  -- here's an example for Pie Town, the a very far south US town on the divide route, note the average high is 44F and the average low 16F in December.  Brr.  

You'll probably be happy on the Pacific Coast route starting soon, although the first big storm of the season is rolling in tonight.  Be prepared for rain.  Often pacific storms bring south (head) winds, so be ready for that too.

If you are on an ultra budget, it might be even more important to be in friendly climates, as you won't have the hotel option as a bailout.

I'm doing a little bit of the coast at the end of Oct, (SF-Santa Barbara) so perhaps I'll see you out there.

have a great trip!  


Offline litespeed

going south
« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2006, 12:44:56 am »
In my loop around the country in 2004 I had fairly good weather from Florence OR to San Francisco in late September and early October but very rainy, stormy weather in late October from San Francisco to Guadalupe. I don't recommend bicycling the Pacific coast after the end of September. The wind was never a problem but the rain sure was. Another problem is pesky bums and winos in the parks and campgrounds in coastal southern California. Some of the state parks actually lock up the restrooms/showers to keep them out. They get worse the farther south you go. That's the reason I left the coast and cut inland at Guadalupe.
    If you decide to go south east of the Sierra Nevadas be ready for long stretches of nothing.