Author Topic: Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?  (Read 10350 times)

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Offline TCS

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2007, 01:27:07 pm »
Heinz Stucke left his home in Germany in 1962 on his three speed bicycle - and has been on the road continuously ever since!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_St%C3%BCcke

TCS

"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

Offline razor

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2007, 08:13:00 pm »
Okay , that's what I'm talking about . Now I imagine a ten speed bike would be an easier ride . The early Tour De Frances were ridden on single speed bicycles , so it can be done .
   On a different tack , high tech. stuff is not really necessary . While on the FANY tour across New York state 2 years ago I met a British couple who were close to finishing a world tour when they met up with us . Even though they could afford different equipment all their clothes were cotton or wool . They were carrying 150 lbs on each bike . My favorite part about their gear was they said that their tent was not water proof and leaked . The bikes weighted a ton , but they made it . So my 20 lb. cotton sleeping bag doesn't sound so bad .

Razor

This message was edited by razor on 3-14-07 @ 4:29 PM
Razor

Offline DaveB

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #17 on: March 14, 2007, 11:08:57 am »
......all their clothes were cotton or wool . They were carrying 150 lbs on each bike . My favorite part about their gear was they said that their tent was not water proof and leaked . The bikes weighted a ton , but they made it.

"Making it" and enjoying it are two entirely different things.  I assume you want to do more than just survive the experience.

No, you certainly don't need the most leading edge, most expensive equipment available but not using modern technology and materials is foolish when it's available at modest cost.      


Offline ptaylor

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #18 on: March 14, 2007, 04:17:30 pm »
Razor. I love your 3/8 reply. Great ride!

Paul
Paul

Offline ptaylor

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2007, 04:22:53 pm »
OK Sean. So are you suggesting to all on this forum that we take "Whatever was at hand, just grab it and go."?

Paul
Paul

Offline ptaylor

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2007, 04:30:17 pm »
John. Well done!
Gee if you could have thrown in airplane and cruz ship legs, you would have been 100% multimodal.

Paul
Paul

Offline razor

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #21 on: March 14, 2007, 08:28:09 pm »
  DaveB I happen to agree with you about using moderately priced up to date equipment . The point I am trying to make is even if you can't afford that much you can still go on a tour , it doesn't have to be a yuppie pass time .
  Personally when I pack for a tour I try to keep my  gear under 35 lbs. As for the Brit's world tour , they kept their mileage low and were having a great time , not just surviving it . If it had been that Bad a trip there would have been a divorce 5 or 6,000 miles earlier . I think the natural fabrics is a European thing and it worked for them .
  If you are a fairly experienced camper why not " grab it and go ".
   Smooth roads and clear minds ;

Razor
Razor

Offline razor

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2007, 07:00:31 pm »
  I would like to mention a few organized rides I have been on that are reasonably priced and a lot of fun . The great big FANY ride " five hundred miles across New York " a not for profit ride out of Saratoga Springs NY , run by Karen Empie . Bike Virginia run by Bike Walk Virginia . XOBA " Cross Ohio Bike Adventure " run by Columbus Outdoor Pursuits , they do some other great rides in Ohio also . These are all not for profit , week long tours that I have ridden on that were well organized and inexpensive . The people on the tours were nice and the people running the tours were great . They all have web sites .

Razor
Razor

Offline DaveB

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #23 on: March 25, 2007, 11:29:43 am »
Quote
The point I am trying to make is even if you can't afford that much you can still go on a tour , it doesn't have to be a yuppie pass time.


Actually long distance, time consuming bike touring isn't a "yuppie" pass time at all.  The yuppies I know of are too consumed with their careers, cars, houses, social life, etc. to take the time and put forth the effort.  They may have the money but not the interest. If they bike at all it's weekend fitness rides on the most expensive racing bike they could find.  

Tourists tend to be people of modest means who have jobs that allow long absences and families that are either cooperative or non-existant.    


Offline WesternFlyer

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2007, 02:17:50 am »
In 1963 we ate at an all you can eat buffet in Northern California for $0.75.  They lost money on two teenagers as we ate for one hour non-stop.  In Southern California we stopped at the first McDonald's on the trip (Thats right, back then their sign read "over a million served" not " billions and billions".  I got sick to my stomach from 10 $0.15 hamburgers.  Now I think one fast food burger would do me in.

From 16 to 60 the dietary quantity and quality requirements change quite a bit. No corn sweeteners, no trans-fats and overly refined carbohydrates.  I try to keep it natural, fresh and local.  If you slice your own bagel, cheese and tomato, and cut fresh fruit into big tub of plain yogurt and the like you can still eat well at a good price.

bon appetite,

Western FlyerText

Western Flyer
Western Flyer

We must ride light and swift.  It is a long road ahead.

King Theoden

Offline TCS

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #25 on: July 03, 2007, 02:16:33 pm »
So these guys:

http://www.georgemahood.com/lejog.htm

started in Land's End, England wearing nothing but boxer shorts and without a single penny, and finished in John O'Groats, Scotland pretty well equipped.

TCS

"My name is Pither.  I am at present on a cycling tour of the North Cornwall area taking in Bude and..."

Offline bogiesan

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #26 on: July 04, 2007, 12:35:04 am »
> Great topic. I'm heading out on my first tour this summer. ~4000
miles, ~62 days. I'll be completely self-supported, plan on stealth or
gypsy camping every night, and plan on eating as cheap as possible.
My hope is to spend about $15 day on food. Is this possible? (eating on
fifteen bucks a day, I mean) <

Dude, how did the trip go? How did your food budget hold out?

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline bogiesan

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #27 on: July 04, 2007, 12:52:56 am »
>I would like the stories to get out there so others know you don't
have to chose between paying the rent and going on a bike trip .<

You can spend several hours researching ultralight backpacking
techniques, equipment and food suggestions. Just google the terms
and start following links.

When I was backpacking, I went form a 45-50 pound pack (not
including water or food) to less that 20 pounds. I was warm, dry and
comfortable but ultralight gear requires some extra care. It is NOT
bombproof. Ultralight is not for everyone. I got most of my stuyff at
WalMart except the silicon-nylon tarp.

Two interesting sidelights of going light:
1. You don't have much stuff to lose so setting up and tearing down
camp takes only a few minutes
2. Because camp is so simple, going stealth is actually possible. The
biggest thing to hide is your bike.
http://www.ultralightbackpacker.com/
http://www.backpacking.net/
http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/
index.html
http://onestep4me.tripod.com/
http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/~e_lehman/Ultralight/index.html
http://www.backpacker.com/gear/ultralight/0,4066,,00.html
http://www.gossamergear.com/
http://www.golite.com/main/home.aspx
http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/
http://www.closertonature.com/outdoors/ultralight-backpacking.htm
http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/5-31-2005-70810.asp

david boise ID

go, ristretto, FCP/AE
"Read the manual."
I play go. I use Macintosh. Of course I ride a recumbent

Offline razor

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #28 on: July 04, 2007, 09:38:47 pm »
Nice to see people are getting some use from the discussion . Yes , you can get away with $ 15 a day on food ,but you will have to be careful with both making wise purchases for cheap and balanced food . At times you may spend less and others more , and it will balance out if you are preparing the food yourself . Eating in restaurants would be almost impossible .You can go many ways on buying equipment , buy cheap and plan on replacing it frequently or spend lots and figure on it lasting many trips . If you're on a budget spent as much as you reasonably can on a light weight tent to keep you and everything else dry .
    Thanks for the links I will check them out and I hope they help others . Good luck with your trip .

Razor
Razor

Offline scottperkinsusa

Cycling on the Cheap . How low can you go?
« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2007, 01:41:01 pm »
In this modern day of packaging and preservation,
food for less than 15 should be easy.  The big factor
is whether you pass grocery stores or not along the
way.  Think of the many canned foods and bagged items
that keep well.  If you dont have to carry it
( are assured of another grocery store in the next
5 or 6 hours )
you can buy items needing to be cooked and cook em
in the Grocery store.  Most of them these days
have microwaves in them in the deli somewhere.
Think of all the canned stews, chef boy-ar-dee raviolies and pastas, beanie weenies and especially the chicken and dumplings along with some bread and crackers etc and you will eat like kings.  Throw in the nuts and popups and canned meats as well as some frozen burritos that can be eaten on the road when thawed....
Of course never forget the best value of all time
being peanut-butter/jelly and a loaf of bread.
Ps. I've found a terrific cheese that travels well
in hi temps and that is the Cabbot brand Cheddar 75 percent reduced fat. great source of protein btw.